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World Inequality Database on Education

World Inequality Database on Education
The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) highlights the powerful influence of circumstances, such as wealth, gender, ethnicity and location, over which people have little control but which play an important role in shaping their opportunities for education and life. It draws attention to unacceptable levels of education inequality across countries and between groups within countries, with the aim of helping to inform policy design and public debate.

http://www.education-inequalities.org/

Related:  Global Inequality

The World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE) – a new visualization tool to measure marginalization To coincide with the launch of the UN Secretary-General’s Education First initiative, the Education for All Global Monitoring Report Team will launch a new interactive website tomorrow – the World Inequality Database on Education (WIDE). In an exclusive preview for this blog, the Report’s director Pauline Rose explains what WIDE shows and why it is important. I am delighted that the UN Secretary-General is putting Education First by launching his new initiative for education. Three years before the Education for All deadline, it is a much needed push to get more children into school and ensure they learn – especially for the poor and marginalized. In order to design policies to reach the marginalized, it is vital to know who they are and where they live.

Les Misérables Co-occurrence Source: The Stanford GraphBase. A network can be represented by an adjacency matrix, where each cell ij represents an edge from vertex i to vertex j. Here, vertices represent characters in a book, while edges represent co-occurrence in a chapter. Given this two-dimensional representation of a graph, a natural visualization is to show the matrix! However, the effectiveness of a matrix diagram is heavily dependent on the order of rows and columns: if related nodes are placed closed to each other, it is easier to identify clusters and bridges. This example lets you try different orderings via the drop-down menu.

Bloom's interactive taxonomy Last week I had a wonderful opportunity to attend a Master Teachers Course organized in Prague by Intel Teacher Engage and led by the one and only Ollie Bray. Ollie had 18 of us from Eastern Europe + Spain glued to every word he said and made us do all the activities eagerly and enthusiastically for almost ten hours every day. He's an exceptional presenter, a skilful teacher trainer and a great person. Everything was meticulously organized by the wonderful Ruth Merrett from Intel who made it all run smoothly and who took care of all of us with a smile on her face.

Poverty Facts and Stats This figure is based on purchasing power parity (PPP), which basically suggests that prices of goods in countries tend to equate under floating exchange rates and therefore people would be able to purchase the same quantity of goods in any country for a given sum of money. That is, the notion that a dollar should buy the same amount in all countries. Hence if a poor person in a poor country living on a dollar a day moved to the U.S. with no changes to their income, they would still be living on a dollar a day. The new poverty line of $1.25 a day was recently announced by the World Bank (in 2008). For many years before that it had been $1 a day. Graphing Every* Idea In History « Griff's Graphs Update: Graph has now been made interactive. I was originally put onto network visualisation by Simon Raper by his fantastic post graphing the history of philosophy. I’ve learned a lot in the last week and decided to be ambitious. I wanted to see what the entire network would look like – with everyone on Wikipedia.

NSDL.org - National Science Digital Library NSDL provides access to high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Enter one or more keywords in the text box above. To refine your search further, select critieria for educational level, resource type, or subject. When you are finished, click on the Search button. Note that as you select criteria, the selections you made are displayed beneath the search box to the right of 'Your selections.' Click the 'Remove Selections' link to remove your criteria so you can start a new search. 10 facts on health inequities and their causes October 2011 Zoltan Balogh There is ample evidence that social factors, including education, employment status, income level, gender and ethnicity have a marked influence on how healthy a person is.

Citeology - Projects Update: We have submitted a Citeology paper to alt.CHI which you can download here. Citeology looks at the relationship between research publications through their use of citations. The names of each of the 3,502 papers published at the CHI and UIST Human Computer Interaction (HCI) conferences between 1982 and 2010 are listed by year and sorted with the most cited papers in the middle. In total, 11,699 citations were made from one article to another within this collection. SAP - integrate Twitter in PPT Contents If you don’t find what you’re looking for, please add a comment below! PowerPoint Twitter Feedback Slide Instructions titled Poverty Eradication Poverty entails more than the lack of income and productive resources to ensure sustainable livelihoods. Its manifestations include hunger and malnutrition, limited access to education and other basic services, social discrimination and exclusion as well as the lack of participation in decision-making. Various social groups bear disproportionate burden of poverty. The World Social Summit identified poverty eradication as an ethical, social, political and economic imperative of mankind and called on governments to address the root causes of poverty, provide for basic needs for all and ensure that the poor have access to productive resources, including credit, education and training.

The Best Sites That Show Statistics By Reducing The World & The U.S. To 100 People Reducing statistics to “if _________ were 100 people, then __________” can make them very accessible, engaging, and thought-provoking. For example, there’s the well-known “If Twitter Was 100 People” infographic. There are also several sites that use “gimmick” to illustrate much more important data about the world around us. I thought they might make a useful “The Best…” list for English Language Learners and others.

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