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Inquiry-Based Learning

Inquiry-Based Learning

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLQPXd8BiIA

Related:  Inquiry-Based LearningPBL / InquiryLEARNING STYLES (PBL-FLIPPED)Learning Strategies and Instructional ResourcesFuture Focussed learning

TWT: Inquiry-based Learning Strategy What is Inquiry-based learning? The old adage, “Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand” describes the core of inquiry-based learning. Inquiry is the process of seeking truth, information, or knowledge by questioning. Tech Tip: Use project-based learning to support student voice, engagement Student-centered classrooms foster engagement and authentic learning. These environments allow students to have voice in their learning, plus explore and create in ways that the traditional lecture-based classroom can't match. One project we did this year involved having the students identify a problem from their lives and come up with a way to solve it using technology. Two students noted that the current process for signing out of class to use the restroom was tedious, and thought that a simple scan out would be faster and less intrusive to the class. I thought it was an amazing idea and let them run with it. And they did.

PBL Resources Project-based learning (PBL) demands excellent assessment practices to ensure that all learners are supported in the learning process. With good assessment practices, PBL can create a culture of excellence for all students and ensure deeper learning for all. We’ve compiled some of the best resources from Edutopia and the web to support your use of assessment in PBL, including information about strategies, advice on how to address the demands of standardized tests, and summaries of the research.

Preparing a Classroom Culture for Deeper Learning After reading an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence, students form a circle to engage in conversation about liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The inquiry circle begins with two questions posed by the teacher: What is more important, liberty or the pursuit of happiness? SOLO Taxonomy click to view a bigger version As learning progresses it becomes more complex. SOLO, which stands for the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome, is a means of classifying learning outcomes in terms of their complexity, enabling us to assess students’ work in terms of its quality not of how many bits of this and of that they have got right. At first we pick up only one or few aspects of the task (unistructural), then several aspects but they are unrelated (multistructural), then we learn how to integrate them into a whole (relational), and finally, we are able to generalised that whole to as yet untaught applications (extended abstract). The diagram lists verbs typical of each such level. SOLO can be used not only in assessment, but in designing the curriculum in terms of the learning outcomes intended, which is helpful in implementing constructive alignment.

Learning Science Through Inquiry Frequently Asked Questions About Inquiry Workshop 1 | Workshop 2 | Workshop 3 | Workshop 4 | Workshop 5 Workshop 6 | Workshop 7 | Workshop 8 Why Do So Many Schools Want to Implement Project Based Learning, But So Few Actually Do? In a world where so much knowledge is a two-second search away, many schools are losing interest in models that promote static learning to know. They’re looking to embrace dynamic models that promote learning to do and learning to be. Project-Based Learning (PBL) allows learners to develop skills by solving meaningful, real-world challenges , i.e. organizing a 5k race to raise money for charity or writing and performing a play on the colonization of Mars. Recently,Finland redesigned its school system to make PBL a core part of national pedagogy. According toSRI International, students in PBL classrooms achieve higher test grades compared to their traditional counterparts. And in the US, schools that do PBL like theNew Tech Network orActon Academy are rapidly expanding.

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