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Best and Worst Learning Strategies: Why Highlighting is a Waste of Time

Best and Worst Learning Strategies: Why Highlighting is a Waste of Time
In a world as fast-changing and full of information as our own, every one of us — from schoolchildren to college students to working adults — needs to know how to learn well. Yet evidence suggests that most of us don’t use the learning techniques that science has proved most effective. Worse, research finds that learning strategies we do commonly employ, like rereading and highlighting, are among the least effective. (MORE: How to Use Technology to Make You Smarter) The scientific literature evaluating these techniques stretches back decades and across thousands of articles. It’s far too extensive and complex for the average parent, teacher or employer to sift through. The WorstHighlighting and underlining led the authors’ list of ineffective learning strategies. The BestIn contrast to familiar practices like highlighting and rereading, the learning strategies with the most evidence to support them aren’t well known outside the psych lab.

http://ideas.time.com/2013/01/09/highlighting-is-a-waste-of-time-the-best-and-worst-learning-techniques/

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30 Surprising (And Controversial) Ways Students Learn Have you checked your assumptions about student learning at the door? People in general, hold onto beliefs that are shaped by early experiences, the media, and faulty influences. The following list is a compilation of research that may surprise you. ‘I would love to teach but…’ (Clarification: An earlier version of this post noted that the teacher who wrote the e-mail I published used “a sample” from Kris Nielson but it did not give further explanation. This version explains that the sample comes from a 2012 post that was a resignation letter from teacher Kris L. Nielsen of Monroe, N.C. and sent to Union County Public Schools, and this version makes clearer what came directly from Nielsen.) I recently published a post with various answers to the question: How hard is teaching? Here is one response I received by e-mail from a veteran seventh-grade language arts teacher in Frederick, Maryland, who asked not to be identified because she fears retaliation at her school.

The Role of Metacognition in Second Language Teaching and Learning Resources Online Resources: Digests April 2002 EDO-FL-01-10 The Role of Metacognition in Second Language Teaching and Learning Neil J. Anderson, Brigham Young University 2 Important Strategies for Effective Studying Every college student and high school student believes he or she has honed a set of highly effective, useful study skills. I used re-reading, lots of summarizing, note-taking (and outlining), and taking the little tests you would often find at the end of a chapter to help me remember the material I just read. Nobody taught me how to study this way. It was just something I did through trial and error in trying and discarding multiple techniques.

Peering Into Learning The aim of the Peeragogy Handbook is to establish effective peer-learning techniques that you can implement “on the ground.” We suggest that you look through the Handbook, try a few of these suggestions, and see how they work for you. Then we invite you share your experiences, ask for feedback, and work with us to improve the Handbook and the field we affectionately call “Peeragogy.”In this part of the Peeragogy Handbook, we “peeragogues” have summarised the most important and applicable research and insights from two years of inquiry and discussion. Although there’s been no shortage of experimentation and formal research into collaborative, connective, and shared learning systems in the past, there is a new rumbling among education thinkers that suggests that when combined with new platforms and technologies, peer-learning strategies as described here could have a huge impact on the way educational institutions evolve in the future.

13 Ways to Learn in 2013 Sharebar In The eLearning Coach New Year’s tradition, I’m presenting another list of compelling ways to learn online this year. Opportunities for learning seem limitless, applications get smarter and the content gets richer. I just hope we don’t all evolve into robot heads at some point. Downside of Grit April 6, 2014 The Downside of "Grit" What Really Happens When Kids Are Pushed to Be More Persistent?

What happens in the brain when you learn a language? Learning a foreign language can increase the size of your brain. This is what Swedish scientists discovered when they used brain scans to monitor what happens when someone learns a second language. The study is part of a growing body of research using brain imaging technologies to better understand the cognitive benefits of language learning. Tools like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electrophysiology, among others, can now tell us not only whether we need knee surgery or have irregularities with our heartbeat, but reveal what is happening in our brains when we hear, understand and produce second languages. The Swedish MRI study showed that learning a foreign language has a visible effect on the brain. Young adult military recruits with a flair for languages learned Arabic, Russian or Dari intensively, while a control group of medical and cognitive science students also studied hard, but not at languages.

Neuroplasticity and Exercise Will Keep Your Brain Young and Spry Our poor brains. From 25-years-old on, it's just one long downward spiral toward Age Related Cognitive Decline (ARCD). As Dr.

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