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Bonnie Bassler on how bacteria "talk"

Bonnie Bassler on how bacteria "talk"

http://www.ted.com/talks/bonnie_bassler_on_how_bacteria_communicate.html

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The Experiment Is on Us: Science of Animal Testing Thrown Into Doubt (Photo: ressaure)New scientific research has cast grave doubt on the safety testing of hundreds of thousands of consumer products, food additives and industrial chemicals. Everyday products, from soft drinks and baby foods, to paints, gardening products, cosmetics and shampoos, contain numerous synthetic chemicals as preservatives, dyes, active ingredients, or as contaminants. Official assurances of the safety of these chemicals are based largely on animal experiments that use rabbits, mice, rats and dogs. But new results from a consortium of researchers and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggest such assurances may be worthless (Seok et al. 2013). The results of these experiments challenge the longstanding scientific presumption holding that animal experiments are of direct relevance to humans. For that reason they potentially invalidate the entire body of safety information that has been built up to distinguish safe chemicals from unsafe ones.

How Science Turned a Struggling Pro Skier Into an Olympic Medal Contender - Wired Science Saslong.org/R.Perathoner Steven Nyman is poised at the starting gate, alert, coiled, ready. A signal sounds: three even tones followed by a single, more urgent pitch, sending Nyman kicking onto the Val Gardena downhill ski course. He pushes five times with his poles, accelerating as quickly as possible, stabbing the snow frantically. He skates forward with abbreviated strokes, neon green boots moving up and down, his focus on building as much momentum as possible. Nyman is feeling good.

Reprogrammed bacterium speaks new language of life - life - 17 October 2013 Read full article Continue reading page |1|2 Read more: To read a fuller version of this story, click here A bacterium has had its genome recoded so that the standard language of life no longer applies. Instead, one of its words has been freed up to impart a different meaning, allowing the addition of genetic elements that don't exist in nature. The work has been described as the first step towards a new biology because the techniques used should open the door to reinventing the meaning of several genetic words simultaneously, potentially creating new types of biomaterials and drugs.

The bacteria that turns water into ice Meet Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium that causes disease in plants and helps make snow machines work. It all has to do with ice nucleation — the process that forms ice crystals in the atmosphere and, thus, snow. You probably know that raindrops and snowflakes form around something. There's always a central nucleus that serves as the backbone of the water molecule structure. Usually, when people talk about this process, they use soot or some other kind of particulate matter as the example of what a nucleus can be. But bacteria can also become the nucleus of a snowflake.

A bees-eye view: How insects see flowers very differently to us By MICHAEL HANLON Last updated at 08:52 08 August 2007 To the human eye, a garden in bloom is a riot of colour. Is the Universe a Simulation? Photo Gray Matter By EDWARD FRENKEL IN Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel “The Master and Margarita,” the protagonist, a writer, burns a manuscript in a moment of despair, only to find out later from the Devil that “manuscripts don’t burn.” While you might appreciate this romantic sentiment, there is of course no reason to think that it is true. Nikolai Gogol apparently burned the second volume of “Dead Souls,” and it has been lost forever. BBC Nature - Dinosaur gases 'warmed the Earth' 7 May 2012Last updated at 10:43 By Ella Davies Reporter, BBC Nature Apatosaurus, formerly known as Brontosaurus, produced a lot of wind Giant dinosaurs could have warmed the planet with their flatulence, say researchers. British scientists have calculated the methane output of sauropods, including the species known as Brontosaurus.

College - Experience it Firsthand In September 2013, Berry’s original bald eagle couple was once again seen on the Berry College campus in the vicinity of the nest in a tall pine tree situated between the main entrance and the parking lot of the Steven J. Cage Athletic and Recreation Center. The couple spent several months repairing and adding to the nest and catching fish and coots in the nearby Berry quarry, Oostanaula River and Garden Lakes in Rome. An egg was produced on January 14, 2014, followed by a second egg on January 17.

Ancient antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in isolated cave - Technology & Science The samples were collected from a part of Lechuguilla Cave in Carlsbad Cavern National Park in New Mexico that has been cut off from any input from the surface for four million to seven million years. (Max Wisshak/speleo-foto.de/McMaster University) Bacteria that have never before come in contact with humans, their diseases or their antibiotics, but are nevertheless resistant to a variety of antibiotics, have been discovered in a U.S. cave. "This supports a growing understanding that antibiotic resistance is natural, ancient," and an integral part of the genetic heritage of microbes, suggest researchers from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. and the University of Akron in Akron, Ohio, in a new study published this week in the journal PLoS ONE. Scientists have long debated the relative roles of humans and nature in the evolution and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can pose a serious problem in the treatment of diseases.

The smartphone app that could rescue the world's plankton Phytoplankton are the microscopic plant-like cells that float in the sea’s sunlit surface. They underpin the marine food chain and controversy over their stocks means it’s necessary to better understand their existence across the globe. To combat the lack of data on phytoplankton levels, colleagues at Plymouth University and I initiated a project to map them in oceans across the world. Lacking the manpower to do this on our own, we are enlisting seafarers across the globe to get involved in the project. Phytoplankton are the ocean’s main producers – their abundance determines the productivity at every step of the marine food chain above them. This means they determine the numbers of fish in the sea, crabs on the seashore, seabirds in the sky and polar bears on the ice.

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years : Krulwich Wonders... No, this isn't a make-believe place. It's real. They call it "Ball's Pyramid." Did Life On Earth As We Know It Come From ‘Geological Life’? Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter Hydrothermal vents. Bacteria Make Drug-Like Molecules in Humans Bacteria Make Drug-Like Molecules in Humans Janelle Weaver, PhD Small molecules that are produced by bacteria in the human body may represent a promising starting point for studying microbe-host interactions, and potentially a rich source of therapeutics. Read more...

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