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The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con

The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con
In 2012, I attended the ISTE conference in San Diego, CA. While I was only there for about 36 hours, it was easy for me to pick up on one of the hottest topics for the three-day event. The "flipped classroom" was being discussed in social lounges, in conference sessions, on the exhibit floor, on the hashtag and even at dinner. People wanted to know what it was, what it wasn't, how it's done and why it works. Others wanted to sing its praises and often included a vignette about how it works in their classroom and how it transformed learning for their students. Still others railed that the model is nothing transformative at all and that it still emphasizes sage-on-the-stage direct instruction rather than student-centered learning. What It Is The authors go on to explain that the model is a mixture of direct instruction and constructivism, that it makes it easier for students who may have missed class to keep up because they can watch the videos at any time. What It Isn't Why It Works

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipped-classroom-pro-and-con-mary-beth-hertz

Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos Last week, I read an interesting blog post by Shelley Blake-Plock titled “The Problem with TED ed.” It got me thinking about the flipped classroom model and how it is being defined. As a blended learning enthusiast, I have played with the flipped classroom model, seen presentations by inspiring educators who flip their classrooms, and even have a chapter dedicated to this topic in my book. However, I am disheartened to hear so many people describe the flipped classroom as a model where teachers must record videos or podcasts for students to view at home. There are many teachers who do not want to record videos either because they don’t have the necessary skills or equipment, their classes don’t include a lot of lecture that can be captured in recordings, or they are camera shy. Too often the conversation surrounding the flipped classroom focuses on the videos- creating them, hosting them, and assessing student understanding of the content via simple questions or summary assignments.

Social Media For Administrators (Blog Posts) cc licensed ( BY NC ) flickr photo shared by Ken Whytock I recently decided to compile some of the blog posts that I have written regarding social media and administrators on my own blog site. I have created a “page” for these articles that I will continue to update as I write posts that may be helpful, but I just wanted to share this as a blog post to those people who may subscribe to this through an RSS feed or email subscription. There are so many good articles out there but I wanted to compile the ones I have written to help to continuously develop my own portfolio of work.

Resetting Education: YouTube and the Flipped classroom My social circle is populated with math-phobes, because I’m something of a math-phobe. It takes a lot of confidence and conviction to stand up and say definitively, “I have the answer! And lo, gaze upon it.” So I understand when friends of mine post a question from their sixth-grader’s math homework on Facebook in an attempt to crowdsource the answer so they can help their kid. That’s one of the advantages to flipped classrooms—classes that switch up the traditional structure of lecture and homework so that students watch the lectures at home on their computers, and then engage with the material in the classroom. Not only can students follow lessons at their own pace at home, but parents can also follow along as a refresher so they can be better study-buddies for their kids.

7 Essential Tools for a Flipped Classroom - Getting Smart by Guest Author - classrooms, EdTech, flipped classroom By: Erin Palmer The flipped classroom uses technology to allow students more time to apply knowledge and teachers more time for hands-on education. It’s a continually changing strategy that evolves with technology. Innovative educators are usually on the lookout for the latest technology breakthroughs that will help them better organize and conduct flipped classrooms. Why I Gave Up Flipped Instruction A little over a year ago I wrote a post about the flipped classroom, why I loved it, and how I used it. I have to admit, the flip wasn’t the same economic and political entity then that it is now. And in some ways, I think that matters. Here’s the thing.

Promise of the ‘flipped classroom’ eludes poorer school districts By Sarah Butrymowicz Jasmine Redeaux (left) and Nakesha Wilkerson team up to finish a worksheet in a "flipped" chemistry class at their Macon, Ga., high school, while other classmates work on a lab. (Photo by Sarah Butrymowicz) When Portland, Ore., elementary school teacher Sacha Luria decided last fall to try out a new education strategy called “flipping the classroom,” she faced a big obstacle.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Flipped Classrooms I really enjoyed Mary Beth Hertz's excellent blog published earlier this week, "The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con" -- one of the most concise and balanced views I've read on the buzz-wordy concept of flipping the classroom. Advocates say that "flipped classrooms" help overburdened teachers differentiate their instruction to reach more learners, provide an avenue into more hands-on and student-driven learning during classtime, and shift the teacher's role from "sage on the stage" to learning coach and facilitator. Critics say it's just a fad, relies too heavily on rote instruction, and doesn't go far enough in making the needed changes for teaching and learning reform. I've rounded up this list of videos so you can learn more about the challenges and benefits of flipped classrooms. Video Playlist: Flipping the Classroom

Assessment tools for a flipped or blended class « Education, Technology & Business I am designing a class that I am going to teach next year. It is going to have elements of being flipped or simply blended. In any case, I am looking into different ways in which I can assess student learning that goes on during semester, whether in the classroom or out. Several tools are available that provide assessment for different types of situations: TED Ed is appropriate for assessing a student’s comprehension of a specific video that the student has watched outside of class. 16 Flipped Classrooms In Action Right Now Flipped classrooms require educators to reconstruct traditional classrooms by sending lectures home and providing more face-to-face time at school, but elementary- through university-level instructors are finding good reasons to try them out. Frequently traced back to Colorado teachers Aaron Sams and JonathanBergmann, who were quick to experiment with posting videos online in 2008, the flipped classroom concept is small, simple and has shown positive results. The general idea is that students work at their own pace, receiving lectures at home via online video or podcasts and then devoting class time to more in-depth discussion and traditional “homework.”

Flipping the Classroom: A revolutionary approach to learning presents some pros and cons Illustration by Brian Stauffer Back in 2007, two high school science teachers in Woodland Park, CO, decided to try a “crazy idea.” “We said, ‘What if we stopped lecturing and committed all our lectures to videos?’” says Jon Bergmann, now the lead technology facilitator at the Joseph Sears School in Kenilworth, IL.

Flipped Learning Founders Set the Record Straight The Flipped Classroom | Q&A Flipped Learning Founders Set the Record Straight Flipped learning's slogan, much like the concept itself, is simple enough: Turning learning on its head. While it may be a ways away from universally achieving that goal, it has certainly succeeded in turning more than a few educators' heads. The modern movement, with its emphasis on streaming video lectures in place of traditional homework, got its start five years ago at a small Colorado high school where science teachers Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams began collaborating on ways to use technology to improve their face-to-face time with students.

Transliteracy- QR Codes and Art  Transliteracy is defined on Wikipedia as The ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks. The modern meaning of the term combines literacy with the prefix trans-, which means “across; through”, so a transliterate person is one who is literate across multiple media. Ryan Nadel, in an interview on Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning, defines transliteracy even further: “The most fundamental notion of transliteracy is the ability to adapt. The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture “Publications” I have been writing about and presenting on Flipped Classroom Model: The Full Picture for about a year now. The model that I propose is one where video lectures and tutorials fall within a larger framework of learning activities. I am titling it the Flipped Classroom Model to get folks’ attention given the Flipped Classroom popularity right now. It really is a experiential cycle of learning, where the video lectures support not drive the learning process. A major roadblock or barrier to implementing the flipped classroom is that many educators do not know what to do in the classroom with the time once spent doing lectures. For educators, who are used to and use the didactic model, a framework is needed to assist them with the implementation of the Flipped Classroom.

Hertz, Mary Beth. "The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con." Edutopia. July 10, 2012. Accessed July 10, 2015. by am11445 Jul 10

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