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Happy Planet Index

Happy Planet Index
The new HPI results show the extent to which 151 countries across the globe produce long, happy and sustainable lives for the people that live in them. The overall index scores rank countries based on their efficiency, how many long and happy lives each produces per unit of environmental output. Each of the three component measures – life expectancy, experienced well-being and Ecological Footprint – is given a traffic-light score based on thresholds for good (green), middling (amber) and bad (red) performance. These scores are combined to an expanded six-colour traffic light for the overall HPI score, where, to achieve bright green – the best of the six colours, a country would have to perform well on all three individual components. The scores for the HPI and the component measures can be viewed in map or table-form. By clicking on any individual country in the map or table you can explore its results in more detail.

http://www.happyplanetindex.org/data/

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Aurora Australis Viewing Locations ( southern hemisphere ) ABOUTA collated map of aurora australis viewing locations in Australia & New Zealand.The map was established and is overseen by the admins of Facebook group Aurora Australis Tasmania.FYI: In the southern hemisphere we face South to view aurora australis ........( in the northern hemisphere you face North to view aurora borealis ) ==================== DATA LICENSING ====================Please do not collect / disseminate our map location information Please ask for permission if you wish to re-use our informationAs per respective entities======================================================= DISCLAIMER & SAFETY NOTICE:> Care taken but no responsibility is given for the accuracy of the map - locations have been supplied by members of Aurora Australis Tasmania &/or Aurora Australis (New Zealand) facebook groups, who are contributing the location to be suitable for viewing an aurora australis from. !!

Club of Rome′s new book reads like an eco manifesto The Club of Rome's new report includes some drastic claims. The think tank's mission is to reinvent prosperity through managing economic growth, reducing unemployment and inequality, and addressing climate change. Its new hardcover "One percent growth is enough" was officially launched in Berlin on Tuesday (13.09.2016). The calls for action do come from experts - the organization has more than four decades of experience. Origin of crops by Colin K. Khoury, Harold A. Achicanoy, Carlos Navarro-Racines, Steven Sotelo, and Andy Jarvis at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT). Version 1.0 (May 2016). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). This work is associated with the publication:

This Is Your Brain on Nature When you head out to the desert, David Strayer is the kind of man you want behind the wheel. He never texts or talks on the phone while driving. He doesn’t even approve of eating in the car. A cognitive psychologist at the University of Utah who specializes in attention, Strayer knows our brains are prone to mistakes, especially when we’re multitasking and dodging distractions. Map Explorer Explore maps of future climate as simulated by individual climate models. IMPORTANT: When viewing and using results from individual climate models, it is imperative that you also take account of the range in the climate projections. If you have not already done so, we encourage you to use the Climate Futures approach to identify two or three models that capture the range of results relevant to your application. More information can be found in the Climate Campus here . Initially, the map shows just the four NRM Super-Clusters . Users who wish to see maps of multi-model results should refer to the Technical Report and Cluster Reports .

Global Health 101, Second Edition Welcome to the accompanying Website for Global Health 101, Second Edition. We are pleased to provide these online resources to support classroom education. Formerly titled Essentials of Global Health, Global Health 101 Second Edition is a clear, concise, and user-friendly introduction to the most critical issues in global health. It illustrates key themes with an extensive set of case studies, examples, and the latest evidence. While the book offers a global perspective, particular attention is given to the health-development link, to developing countries, and to the health needs of poor and disadvantaged people. Global Health 101 builds on the success of an introductory global health course taught by the author at the George Washington School of Public Health and Health Services and is ideally suited for the Association of American Colleges and Universities recommended course by the same name.

Population growth & regional internal migration in your area 2013-2014 Melbourne is expected to overtake Sydney as Australia’s largest city by 2056, as parts of Australia face higher growth rates than others. The average population growth rate across Australia is 1.6 per cent, data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows. However, the populations of some districts are shrinking while others have growth rates more than 10 per cent. The suburb of Truganina, part of Greater Melbourne, saw a 16.8 per cent population growth in 2013-14. The district of Anglesea, 90km away, saw its population decline 3.3 per cent. Future - Have you ever felt ‘solastalgia’? Every few months, Oxford Dictionaries makes global headlines when it adds new words to its online vocabulary – the most recent updates include ‘hangry’ (anger resulting from hunger) and ‘manspreading’ (sitting with legs wide apart). At the same time, researchers are coining new words that never quite make it into the popular lexicon – but perhaps they should. While you won’t find it in the Oxford English Dictionary, philosopher Glenn Albrecht once coined one such word while working at the University of Newcastle in Australia. 'Solastalgia’ – a portmanteau of the words ‘solace’ and ‘nostalgia’ – is used not just in academia but more widely, in clinical psychology and health policy in Australia, as well as by US researchers looking into the effects of wildfires in California. It describes the feeling of distress associated with environmental change close to your home, explains Albrecht. Solastalgia is when your endemic sense of place is being violated – Glenn Albrecht, philosopher

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