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How to Think Like a Computer Scientist — How to Think like a Computer Scientist: Interactive Edition

How to Think Like a Computer Scientist — How to Think like a Computer Scientist: Interactive Edition
This interactive book is a product of the Runestone Interactive Project at Luther College, led by Brad Miller and David Ranum. There have been many contributors to the project. Our thanks especially to the following: This book is based on the Original work by: Jeffrey Elkner, Allen B. The Runestone Interactive tools are open source and we encourage you to contact us, or grab a copy from GitHub if you would like to use them to write your own resources.

Installation and quick start — nose 1.3.0 documentation nose extends unittest to make testing easier. On most UNIX-like systems, you’ll probably need to run these commands as root or using sudo. Install nose using setuptools/distribute: Or pip: Or, if you don’t have setuptools/distribute installed, use the download link at right to download the source package, and install it in the normal fashion: Ungzip and untar the source package, cd to the new directory, and: However, please note that without setuptools/distribute installed, you will not be able to use third-party nose plugins. This will install the nose libraries, as well as the nosetests script, which you can use to automatically discover and run tests. Now you can run tests for your project: cd path/to/project nosetests You should see output something like this: .................................. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Ran 34 tests in 1.440s OK Indicating that nose found and ran your tests. For help with nosetests’ many command-line options, try:

Welcome to Python.org free python books s Python Class - Educational Materials Welcome to Google's Python Class -- this is a free class for people with a little bit of programming experience who want to learn Python. The class includes written materials, lecture videos, and lots of code exercises to practice Python coding. These materials are used within Google to introduce Python to people who have just a little programming experience. The first exercises work on basic Python concepts like strings and lists, building up to the later exercises which are full programs dealing with text files, processes, and http connections. To get started, the Python sections are linked at the left -- Python Set Up to get Python installed on your machine, Python Introduction for an introduction to the language, and then Python Strings starts the coding material, leading to the first exercise. This material was created by Nick Parlante working in the engEDU group at Google. Tip: Check out the Python Google Code University Forum to ask and answer questions.

Alsacréations : Actualités et tutoriels HTML, HTML5, CSS, CSS3, standards du web Python Extension Packages for Windows - Christoph Gohlke by Christoph Gohlke, Laboratory for Fluorescence Dynamics, University of California, Irvine. This page provides 32- and 64-bit Windows binaries of many scientific open-source extension packages for the official CPython distribution of the Python programming language. The files are unofficial (meaning: informal, unrecognized, personal, unsupported, no warranty, no liability, provided "as is") and made available for testing and evaluation purposes. If downloads fail reload this page, enable JavaScript, disable download managers, disable proxies, clear cache, and use Firefox. Most binaries are built from source code found on PyPI or in the projects public revision control systems. Refer to the documentation of the individual packages for license restrictions and dependencies. Use pip version 8 or newer to install the downloaded .whl files. Install numpy+mkl before other packages that depend on it. The files are provided "as is" without warranty or support of any kind. Build Environment

Radix sort In computer science, radix sort is a non-comparative integer sorting algorithm that sorts data with integer keys by grouping keys by the individual digits which share the same significant position and value. A positional notation is required, but because integers can represent strings of characters (e.g., names or dates) and specially formatted floating point numbers, radix sort is not limited to integers. Radix sort dates back as far as 1887 to the work of Herman Hollerith on tabulating machines.[1] Most digital computers internally represent all of their data as electronic representations of binary numbers, so processing the digits of integer representations by groups of binary digit representations is most convenient. Two classifications of radix sorts are least significant digit (LSD) radix sorts and most significant digit (MSD) radix sorts. LSD radix sorts process the integer representations starting from the least digit and move towards the most significant digit. Efficiency[edit]

Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner, 3rd Edition: Michael Dawson: 9781435455009: Amazon.com: Books Learn Python - Free Interactive Python Tutorial Developer Network

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