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Dictionary of English slang and colloquialisms of the UK

Dictionary of English slang and colloquialisms of the UK

http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/index.htm

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Susie Dent's Modern Tribes: Brits have perfected a secret version of the English language to use with their co-workers — Quartz British English has many distinctive hallmarks: a plethora of “u”s borrowed from old French, a use of “s”s where “z”s are used in American English (realise, instead of realize), colo(u)rful idioms, and a rich history of slang. For lexicographer, writer, and broadcaster Susie Dent, British English is also “littered with tribal footprints,” as she explains her new book, Dent’s Modern Tribes: The Secret Languages of Britain. In the book, Dent gathered and chronicled the unique words and phrases used among specific professions and interest groups in the UK, terms she acquired through hundreds of interviews and, in her words, “eavesdropping.” “Every sport, every profession, every group united by a single passion draws on a lexicon that is uniquely theirs, and theirs for a reason,” she writes.

The Lucifer Effect by Philip Zimbardo he Lucifer Effect raises a fundamental question about the nature of human nature: How is it possible for ordinary, average, even good people to become perpetrators of evil? In trying to understand unusual, or aberrant behavior, we often err in focusing exclusively on the inner determinants of genes, personality, and character, as we also tend to ignore what may be the critical catalyst for behavior change in the external Situation or in the System that creates and maintains such situations. I challenge readers to reflect on how well they really know themselves, and how much confidence they have in what they would or would not ever do when put into new behavioral settings.

Find language courses, learn English online,learn Spanish, Frenc Do you have a question about the correct usage of the semi-colon or how to place relative adverbs in a sentence? If so, you've come to the right place! The edufind.com English grammar guide is a complete reference on the rules of English usage. Every grammatical rule is explained in clear, simple language with several examples and, when necessary, counter-examples. The grammatical rules covered by this guide are categorized by part of speech. You will find the categories listed below. english idioms Use the navigation above to browse our A-Z of English idioms … If you have a question about idioms, ask us about it in our Idioms Discussion Forum. If you know of an idiom that you would like to be listed here, please use our online form to suggest an idiom. Below are listed the latest 30 entries that have been added to our database of English idioms & idiomatic expressions. Subscribe to our idioms feed to keep up-to-date: Members Get More - Sign up for free and gain access to many more English idioms and slang expressions.

Slang: the changing face of cool Slang has always fascinated me. My father, who grew up in the council estates of Slough during the second world war, knew slang words for most situations, good and bad, which I would hear regularly around the house as a child. Somewhere in my early 20s, I stumbled across a cheap secondhand reprint of a book by an 18th-century Londoner named Francis Grose, which recorded the everyday speech of the people he encountered in the low drinking dens, bagnios and rookeries around Covent Garden and St Giles. First published in 1785, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue remains for me the single most important slang collection of them all. Having spent the past four years writing a history of English slang, it gradually became clear to me that the digital age is altering slang: both the way it evolves and is spread, and attitudes towards it. Of course, slang has always had its detractors.

AP Poetry Terms AP English Poetry Terms (Presented by Dennis Carroll of High Point University at AP Workshop) Listed and defined below are literary terms that you will need to know in order to discuss and write about works of poetry. You are already familiar with many of these. Misused Words and Phrases This site talks about common problems with word usage in English. Most of the material comes from Merriam-Webster Online. I've mentioned any differences between U.S. alliteration dictionary This Vocabulary of Alliteration is a new aid in writing poems and songs, and in the study of phonetic or phonemic syllable divisions. Alliteration is one of several aural devices in literature making use of the repetition of single sounds or groups of sounds. It is quite often believed to be nothing else than the repetition of word-initial sounds, especially consonants. For such rough and ready alliteration a special dictionary would hardly be needed. However, if alliteration is, in a more sophisticated and traditional fashion, interpreted as the repetition of speech sounds at the beginning of syllables, and of stressed syllables only, then word-initial consonance or assonance need not be alliteration and vice versa. (So that rough does not alliterate with a word like reward but with, for instance, ignoramus.)

English grammar references and English level tests Do you have a question about the correct usage of the semi-colon or how to place relative adverbs in a sentence? If so, you've come to the right place! The edufind.com English grammar guide is a complete reference on the rules of English usage. Every grammatical rule is explained in clear, simple language with several examples and, when necessary, counter-examples. The grammatical rules covered by this guide are categorized by part of speech. You will find the categories listed below. A call to arms: let's get rid of all the jargon! In this high-tech, gee-whiz world, more and more people seem to speak in jargon or, as I like to call it, gibberish. Whether it’s exclusive terms understandable by only a certain few, buzz-words intended to impress in meetings, or euphemisms to make something seem better than it is, the use of jargon really does little more than confuse the listener. Jargon tends to go through three stages: Jargon starts out as a simple technical sublanguage: users devise abbreviations and acronyms that help speed up processes.

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