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Grades 7-12 Instructors and Students

Grades 7-12 Instructors and Students

Novels to Know: Middle School Edition As part of our preparation for Common Core standards our district asked the librarians to put together a list of noteworthy novels that would help meet the higher standards for text complexity and reading level. My two middle grade partners, Monique German and Kristen Hearne, and I will be putting together the list for our level. Priority number one for me was to become as much of an expert on Common Core as I can so I have been spending time learning the details of our new standards. If you haven't read the details on how texts are evaluated I highly suggest reading Appendix A of the standards document. There are three considerations when evaluating text: quantitative, qualitative, reader and task. Quantitative can be measured with Lexile or a similar tool. To look at a diagram comparing current Lexile bands by grade and the "stretch" bands for Common Core visit the Lexile site. This list does not impress me. I have been deliberately choosing books lately with this in mind.

UDL Editions by CAST Romeo and Juliet No Fear Shakespeare puts Shakespeare's language side-by-side with a facing-page translation into modern English—the kind of English people actually speak today. Table of Contents Characters Prologue Prologue Act 1 Act 1, Scene 1 Act 1, Scene 2 Act 1, Scene 3 Act 1, Scene 4 Act 1, Scene 5 Act 2 Act 2, Prologue Act 2, Scene 1 Act 2, Scene 2 Act 2, Scene 3 Act 2, Scene 4 Act 2, Scene 5 Act 2, Scene 6 Act 3 Act 3, Scene 1 Act 3, Scene 2 Act 3, Scene 3 Act 3, Scene 4 Act 3, Scene 5 Act 4 Act 4, Scene 1 Act 4, Scene 2 Act 4, Scene 3 Act 4, Scene 4 Act 4, Scene 5 Act 5 Act 5, Scene 1 Act 5, Scene 2 Act 5, Scene 3 How to Cite No Fear Romeo and Juliet Experimental Game Turns Players into Poets and Writers What do British Romantic Era poets and video games have in common? The answer is Elegy for a Dead World, an unlikely game that leaves the players with “no game to play,” but to explore three long-dead civilizations, observe, and make notes... or stories — or poems — or songs. The three lost worlds feature beautiful scenery, moving music, and are inspired by Percy Shelley's Ozymandias, Lord Byron's Darkness, and John Keats' When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be. They create a strong, moody atmosphere that becomes the breeding ground for feelings and ideas. The game began in 2013 as a collaboration between Dejobaan Games and Popcannibal. “The most important thing for us is that someone sits down and has a positive experience, doing something creative.” The game eases you into the writing process with challenges, prompts, and fill-in-the-blank sentences. “The most important thing for us is that someone sits down and has a positive experience, doing something creative. Photos: Elegy

Fallacies What this handout is about This handout discusses common logical fallacies that you may encounter in your own writing or the writing of others. The handout provides definitions, examples, and tips on avoiding these fallacies. Arguments Most academic writing tasks require you to make an argument—that is, to present reasons for a particular claim or interpretation you are putting forward. You may have been told that you need to make your arguments more logical or stronger. Each argument you make is composed of premises (this is a term for statements that express your reasons or evidence) that are arranged in the right way to support your conclusion (the main claim or interpretation you are offering). You also need to be sure that you present all of your ideas in an orderly fashion that readers can follow. This handout describes some ways in which arguments often fail to do the things listed above; these failings are called fallacies. What are fallacies? So what do fallacies look like?

Fountas & Pinnell The Common Core Standards for Language and Literacy and The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades PreK–8: A Guide to Teaching There is a strong relationship between the new Common Core Standards for Language and Literacy and Fountas and Pinnell’s The Continuum of Literacy Learning. The goal of both documents is to ensure that all students are college-/and career-ready literate no later than the end of high school. Click on the links below to review: © Copyright 2010. The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Fountas & Pinnell LLI System Test Preparation The Common Core State Standards align with Test Preparation items in the Fountas & Pinnell LLI Intermediate Systems. State Specific Resources Prekindergarten State Specific Standards for Language and Literacy and The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades PreK-8: A Guide to Teaching The Continuum of Literacy Learning, PreK can also be found in Literacy Beginnings: A Prekindergarten Handbook

Common-Core Writers Craft Curriculum Criteria Published Online: July 22, 2011 New guidelines on crafting curriculum materials for the common standards in English/language arts are reigniting debate about how to ensure a marketplace of good instructional materials for the new standards without crossing the line into telling teachers how to teach. The focal point of the conversations is a set of “publishers’ criteria” issued recently by the two lead writers of the English/language arts section of the common standards, which have been adopted by all but five states. Working under a contract with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, an avid backer of the standards, David Coleman and Susan Pimentel wrote a pair of documents highlighting the key ideas of the standards and describing the qualities of instructional materials they consider a faithful reflection of them. The criteria center on aspects of the standards that represent a significant shift. . The impetus behind the criteria, Ms. Validating Materials Teacher Training Linda P. Mr. Mr.

Common Core Video Series Education Commissioner John King, David Coleman and Kate Gerson explain every key aspect of Common Core standards in depth. By viewing this 15-part series, New York educators and administrators will learn step-by-step how to implement the Common Core for ELA/Literacy and Math in their schools and classrooms. You’ll also gain a deeper understanding of the rationale behind the Common Core and what it will mean for students across our state. Produced in partnership with NYS PBS stations WCNY/Syracuse and WNET/New York City, the series illuminates the Common Core through conversations between Commissioner King, a former high school social studies teacher and middle school principal; Coleman, a contributing author of the Common Core State Standards; and Gerson, a Senior Fellow with the USNY Regents Research Fund and a former high school English teacher and principal. Viewing the Videos The Common Core videos can be viewed online or downloaded from the links below for offline viewing.

Are We Really Still Assigning Book Reports? 20 Ways to Encourage Students to Interact with Texts Traditional book reports should be a thing of the past. I mean, do you really want to read 30-125 recaps of the same book? (YAWN!) Well, guess what, your students don't want to write them either. They are boring and tedious. And most importantly, they really don't measure the comprehension of a text or confirm that they have even read the text assigned. Don't just have your students report on what they are reading. Technology-Enhanced Book Interactions With all the free technology available today, why not give students some interesting choices to use in their textual interpretation? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Creative and Critical Thinking Book Interactions (No Tech Necessary) What if your students just don't have enough access to technology to make assignments like these feasible? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. So, there you have it.

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