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Developing digital literacies

Developing digital literacies
'By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society. For example, the use of digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; digital professionalism; the use of specialist digital tools and data sets; communicating ideas effectively in a range of media; producing, sharing and critically evaluating information; collaborating in virtual networks; using digital technologies to support reflection and PDP; managing digital reputation and showcasing achievements.' Developing Digital Literacies was a two-year Jisc-funded programme (2011-2013) to promote the development of coherent, inclusive approaches to digital capability across institutions of further and higher education. This 'home' page provides access to the activities and outcomes of the programme. Themes - key themes which emerged from the programme Resources - resources from the programme grouped by type and purpose/user group

http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com/w/page/46421608/Developing%20digital%20literacies

Related:  digital skillsConnected Learning & Digital LiteraciesDigital literacy & inclusion

Jisc digital capability codesign challenge blog It’s been a hectic, interesting and sometimes information-overloaded couple of months on the Digital Capabilities frameworks project. Lou McGill and I have reviewed over 60 existing frameworks for describing the digital capabilities of staff, from professional frameworks which might only touch on digital practice, to frameworks from the IT industry, digital media, and business innovation. We’ve looked at a host of publications and web sites. And I’ve carried out interviews with dozens of people who are doing work in this area, whether they are based in professional bodies or in universities and colleges, or in industry and the professions outside of education. One of the surprising things to emerge from this process, as Sarah Davies has outlined, is the affection people feel for some of the work Jisc has already done in this area.

MOOCs take their place in the corporate learning world According a report released by Technavio, the corporate e-learning market in the USA is predicted to reach a value of nearly $31 billion by 2020. Much of this can be attributed to the rapid advancement of technology, like mobile devices and cloud-based learning systems. Now, corporate learning is expanding to include free and low-cost learning opportunities to help bring more information into the workplace. H of Lords report on digital skills Recommendations The report, entitled "Make or Break: The UK's Digital Future", urges the incoming Government to seize the opportunity to secure the UK’s place as a global digital leader by, among other things: making digital literacy a core subject at school, alongside English and Maths; viewing the internet as important as a utility, accessible to all; andputting a single ‘Digital Agenda’ at the heart of Government. The report also noted that there are certain sectors of society, and UK regions, falling behind at great cost to the economy; and that industry has a vital role to play in developing the right skills in the workplace, in further and higher education, and in schools. The report also found that there is a distinct lack of Government coordination on digital initiatives – the current digital 'activity' within Government includes four Government Ministers, a Taskforce, a Committee, and a Unit.

DCMS Digital Inclusion Outcomes Framework The Digital Inclusion Outcomes Framework is a single, flexible template for benchmarking and tracking digital inclusion in the UK, and evaluating digital inclusion activities locally. It aims to evidence the wider economic, health and social benefits of digital inclusion. It was developed by the Government Digital Service (GDS) Digital Inclusion Research Working Group, which brings together representatives from academia, government, private sector organisations and charities.

UNESCO Global MIL Assessment Framework UNESCO Global MIL Assessment Framework The UNESCO Global Media and Information Literacy (MIL) Assessment Framework provides a conceptual and theoretical framework for MIL, and introduces the rationale and methodology for conducting an assessment of country readiness and existing competencies on MIL at the national level. It also includes practical steps for adaptation of its recommendations at national level. An increasing flow of information and media content created and shared using new information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the growing role of media and information providers in society offer new possibilities for social, economic and political development. In order to take an advantage of these developments and tackle the resulting challenges, there is a need for a new approach to literacy that is more situational, pluralistic and dynamic, drawing attention to information, communication, media, technological and digital aspects.

Author discusses new book, 'The Uberfication of the University' How much do Uber, Airbnb and other elements of the "sharing economy" explain the state of higher education? Quite a lot, according to Gary Hall, professor of media and performing arts at Coventry University, in Britain. He outlines his views in The Uberfication of the University, a short book (55 pages) published as part of the University of Minnesota Press Forerunners series on new ideas. Hall responded via email to questions about his book. Basic Digital Skills Definition In the UK, 1 in 5 adults lack the following Basic Digital Skills. Want to know why? Take a look at what the common barriers to digital exclusion are. The Basic Digital Skills definition has been adopted to focus partner support and celebrate success. We have consulted widely with a range of stakeholders including academics at the London School of Economics (LSE), our Go ON UK board partners, Citizens Online, the London Business School and Tinder Foundation in the development of the Basic Digital Skills definition.

UK Govt's Digital Inclusion Strategy Last December, we published action 15 of the Government Digital Strategy to show the government’s commitment to digital inclusion. Today, as the Director responsible for this area of work, I wanted to mark the launch of the Digital Inclusion Strategy as part of that commitment to reduce the number of people and organisations offline. We’ve also brought together 40 organisations from public, private and voluntary sectors to sign up to a new UK Digital Inclusion Charter. Partners like AgeUK, Asda, EE and the Society of Chief Librarians will work together in new ways to tackle digital exclusion by creating actions that can be scaled up nationally. This is a really exciting time for us because it’s the first time the government will be bringing together such a wide number of partners to tackle digital exclusion. We want to scale up good ideas, stop duplication and make it easier for people to work together.

Reimagining learning for a post-digital world (part 1) – Solutions not problems Over the last few years I have made the case for a substantive and meaningful debate about redefining pedagogy and reimagining teaching and learning firstly for a digital age and more recently for what many are calling the post-digital world. The logical impossibility of Status Quo: Six disconnects that demand a digital pedagogy (or at least a good debate about it) ‘I am going to blow the whole thing to kingdom come’: In praise of discontinuity within a digital pedagogy Shit or get off the pot: Why are we still talking about the seismic impacts technology will have on higher education? But why do we need to debate or design a new pedagogical approach for our modern institutions? There are now more university students and graduates than ever before.

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