background preloader

The Essence of Connected Learning

The Essence of Connected Learning

http://vimeo.com/37639766

Related:  Connectedconectes learning

Connected Learning Visually Explained for Teachers We have been talking a lot about the connected educator in the previous posts because we are in a month that is officially labelled the Connected Educator month, however, today we will have a cursory look into another closely related topic: connected learning. Connected learning is a learning theory that is a set of conceptions and ideas about the nature of learning. This theory, as is indicated in the graphic below, works towards making learning a collaborative task built through the participation of different parts.

15 Internet Trends That Are Changing How We Connect 15 Internet Trends That Are Changing How We Connect by Tom Vander Ark first appeared on gettingsmart.com Mary Meeker from leading venture capital investors Kleiner Perkins presented on internet trends at Stanford last week. It’s worth reviewing. The money quote: “The magnitude of upcoming change will be stunning—we are still in spring training.” Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Connected Learning Explained Are we really taking advantage of this digital information age to enhance the quality of today's education? Are we keeping pace with the fast-changing learning styles of our students? Do we know when, how, and what technology to use in our classrooms ?

Learning 2.0 is Dumb: Use ‘Connected Learning’ Instead Going forward, and as best I can, I’ll use the term ‘Connected Learning’ to describe a knowledge ecosystem made up of formal, informal and social learning behaviours and modalities. It’s about time I (and perhaps you as well) retire the term Learning 2.0. There are a few reasons for this: Therefore, I present to you ‘Connected Learning’ … at least from a modality perspective:

Critical Review of Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age In his 2005 article Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age, Siemens outlined a new way of thinking about learning based on the recent advances in information technology. He argues that this new theory, connectivism, supersedes previous learning theories, including behaviourism, cognitivism, and contructivism. In this post, I am seeking to further my understanding of this new theory, examine its limitations, and consider its relevance to both classroom teaching as well as knowledge management practices within organizations. Defining Connectivism In the article, Siemens outlines the fundamental principles of connectivism: From E-Learning to We-Learning The corporate training industry is undergoing some major changes. Over last few months we have been involved in many discussions with organizations about the tremendous needs to build, manage, and formalize their social and collaborative learning programs. This is being driven by many factors: the slowing economy, the "always-connected" nature of the workforce, and the explosion of social software tools and platforms now available.

Connected Learning Principles We are living in a historical moment of transformation and realignment in the creation and sharing of knowledge, in social, political and economic life, and in global connectedness. There is wide agreement that we need new models of education suited to this historic moment, and not simply new models of schooling, but entirely new visions of learning better suited to the increasing complexity, connectivity, and velocity of our new knowledge society. Fortunately, we are also able to harness the same technologies and social processes that have powered these transformations in order to provide the next generation with learning experiences that open doors to academic achievement, economic opportunity, and civic engagement. What would it mean to think of education as a responsibility of a distributed network of people and institutions, including schools, libraries, museums and online communities?

Graduate Program in Training and Development @ Roosevelt University Connectivism: A new learning theory? Guest Blogger: Barry I came across the term Connectivism coined by George Siemens while doing research for TRDV 499 Master paper. The concept is interesting, giving thought to the digital era and how we learn. Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models DML (a “Digital Media and Learning” project), believes in the “the power of participation.” And they’ve created a learning model overview to prove it. We recently published our Inside-Out Learning model, an attempt to return the learning to the families, organizations, and communities authentic to the learner. DML’s model is similar in philosophy, underscoring the role of interdependence. Called Connected Learning, the model is a response to changing face of culture as it relates to social and digital media.

A Day in the Life of a Connected Educator – Using social media in 21st century classrooms One of our main goals at Powerful Learning Practice is to turn educators into 21st Century educators. That is, teach them how to use social media and other powerful Web 2.0 tools to transform their classrooms into learning environments that are ready for today’s iGeneration students. One of the most common questions we get is, “But where do we find the time to use all this new technology?” To answer that question, we developed this infographic – A Day in the Life of a Connected Educator to show that using social media in your classroom and in your life can be integrated, easy, and fun. Scroll down and take a look or click for a larger version. Get connected

Educators: Embrace Social Media What is up with teacher development and the fear of social media? So many educators are soaring into the next advent of learning, while others continue to lecture and talk at the kids, avoiding the digital tools that are so readily available. Yesterday, in a passing conversation discussing sharing of great resources, I asked a colleague if they knew what a PLN is? ”Huh?” she said. “A P L what?”

Related: