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Inclusion of Children with Disabilities Outside the Classroom

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All Children should have the opportunity to feel included no matter their ethnicity, their gender, their beliefs, and their ability. Many people believe that including children with disabilities in a general education classroom is enough for these children to feel included.

However, inclusion does not end within the classroom it goes beyond the classroom experience; into extracurricular activities, clubs, and the community. Allowing children with disabilities to participate in extracurricular activities has many benefits for the children. Through the participation of extracurricular activities children begin to develop talents and social/emotional skills.

When children begin to develop these things they begin to build their self-esteem and independence. The two most obvious benefits of inclusion in extracurricular activities are the promotion of a healthy life style and the opportunity to create new friendships. Just like their non-disabled peers they want to fit in with the rest of us. These children just want to have the opportunity to feel accepted and to be a part of the group. If people take away the opportunity to participate in clubs and activities in the community because the child/children have a disability ; they are limiting the ability for these children to learn new skills, realize their strengths and weaknesses, and, more importantly, learn to create friendships that could have been non-existent. When looking through the pictures I wanted my viewers to see the message I was trying to convey through the images. The images show the affects that inclusion had on children and allows people to get a glimpse of what really is inclusion. For example, in the image titled Pin by TES Special Ed on Special Ed/Disability Infographics and Visua… it lists the exact meaning of what inclusion really is. Many people only have an idea of what inclusion is, however, inclusion is much more than just putting a child with a disability into a general classroom. The second image, “It’s Rude to Exclude”, is a short and catch phrase that has a lot of meaning. When viewers see this image I want them to think of all the times that they have ever felt excluded and how painful it had felt for them. I want the viewer to realize that this pain happens to children with disabilities on a daily basis. Through the third image titled Cutout-People.jpg (JPEG Image, 1020 × 471 pixels) it is an example of children of different abilities coming together and creating a friendship that may last a life time; a message of what inclusion can do. This brings me to the videos that I had chosen. Through the videos that I chose it shows the actions of the type of inclusion that many people do not see on a daily basis. For example, the videos New Inclusive Playground Opens For Kids of All Abilities and Special needs students enjoy Camp Inclusion show the positive affect that extracurricular activities brought to the lives of the children that had the chance to take part in these activities. The first three articles in my curation, Obama Orders Schools to Give Disabled Kids Sports Access, Students with Disabilities and Extracurricular Activities | Law Office of Matthew Stoloff, and Boosting Inclusion for Students with Disabilities, talk about the laws that support inclusion of non-school related activities. These articles help the viewer understand the politics behind this very important topic. The other three articles available, The Importance of Inclusion and Community for Children With Special Needs - Early Intervention Support, Boosting Inclusion in After School Activities with AT and Supplemental Services, and Including Students With Moderate and Severe Disabilities in Extracurricular and Community Recreation Activities: Steps to Success, explain to the viewer’s why inclusion in these types of activities are important for those with special needs and have suggestions that may help parents and educator encourage their students to participate in these non-school related activities.

Finally, the last two artifacts in my curation, the websites, and these websites are about two types of organizations that helped to bring out inclusion in non-school settings to children with disabilities. I want to send out the message through this websites that there are so many ways for people to come together and help those who have disabilities feel included. The first website is Special Olympics Southern California. When viewers look through this website they may find that this organization promotes healthy living and the chances for those with special needs to get involved in their community through sports. The second website is about, the organization, Unlimited Play. The mission of this organization is to promote play by bring accessible playgrounds to all children and families. All these artifacts promote the acceptances of people with disabilities outside a classroom setting.

Pin by TES Special Ed on Special Ed/Disability Infographics and Visua… Pin by TES Special Ed on Special Ed/Disability Infographics and Visua… Cutout-People.jpg (JPEG Image, 1020 × 471 pixels) New Inclusive Playground Opens For Kids of All Abilities. Special Olympics Southern California Video. Social Inclusion and the ADA - Extended. Special needs students enjoy Camp Inclusion. Winter Storm Warning issued November 25 at 2:55PM EST expiring November 27 at 12:00AM EST in effect for: Adams, Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Mifflin, Perry, Schuylkill, Somerset, York Winter Weather Advisory issued November 25 at 7:05PM EST expiring November 26 at 6:00PM EST in effect for: Baltimore, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Baltimore City Winter Storm Warning issued November 25 at 11:01AM EST expiring November 26 at 6:00PM EST in effect for: Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick.

Special needs students enjoy Camp Inclusion

Obama Orders Schools to Give Disabled Kids Sports Access. Children with disabilities must have “equal access” to school athletics, U.S.

Obama Orders Schools to Give Disabled Kids Sports Access

President Barack Obama’s administration said today. Schools are required to make “reasonable modifications” to let disabled children take part in sports, the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights said in a letter to districts. For example, a track team must give a visual cue alongside a starter pistol, so a deaf student could race. The agency told school districts that such accommodations have long been required for extracurricular activities -- as they are for academics -- under a 1973 civil-rights law, section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

“Sports can provide invaluable lessons in discipline, selflessness, passion and courage, and this guidance will help schools ensure that students with disabilities have an equal opportunity to benefit from the life lessons they can learn on the playing field or on the court,” Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a statement. ‘A Landmark’ Separate Programs. Students with Disabilities and Extracurricular Activities. One of the most important aspects of school is non-academic extracurricular activities.

Students with Disabilities and Extracurricular Activities

Boosting Inclusion for Students with Disabilities. Administrators in public schools are undoubtedly familiar with their duties under federal law to serve students with disabilities in the educational program.

Boosting Inclusion for Students with Disabilities

Far fewer, however, are aware of their legal obligations to these same students in after-school athletics and extracurricular activities. The Importance of Inclusion and Community for Children With Special Needs - Early Intervention Support. Boosting Inclusion in After School Activities with AT and Supplemental Services.

By: National Center for Technology Innovation and Center for Implementing Technology in Education (CITEd) The Individuals with Disabilities Improvement Act (IDEA 2004) mandates that supplemental services and assistive technology be provided when necessary to students who receive special education services.

Boosting Inclusion in After School Activities with AT and Supplemental Services

While the benefits of such supports can be used to meet the academic needs of students with disabilities, supplemental services can also contribute to the social needs of students in activities outside the regular school day. NCTI has suggestions for how assistive and accessible technologies and other supplemental services can help make activities more inclusive for students with special needs. It is critical that education professionals keep pace with students' desire to be involved with extracurricular activities by making certain that they have access to the necessary assistive and adaptive technology and other supplemental services.

Theater Music Book clubs Academic games Endnotes. Sign In - myCI - CSU Channel Islands. Home Page - Special Olympics Southern California. Fully Accessible Playgrounds.