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New Literacies

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Curation as Digital Literacy Practice. I have been writing my PhD so haven’t updated this blog for a while.

Curation as Digital Literacy Practice

Thesis writing is taking up a lot of my mental space as I get the ideas, storyline and contentions to ‘coalesce’ and cohere in a manner suitable for such a piece of work. I’ve been mulling over a series of ideas in my analysis of digital literacies, and one of them is the concept and practice of ‘curation’ as a digital literacy, and what the implications are for curation practices to be better understood, theorised, and subsequently harnessed for educational purposes. My PhD thesis (Bhatt, forthcoming) is not fully completed yet, but some ideas are worth throwing out to collide with others as part of what I believe is a public conversation (#impact #engagement). [Aside: see this brief lecture by Steven Johnson on the ‘collision’ of ideas and the sharing of half-baked hunches] Back to the topic: Source: Students’ previous, even non-academic, work gets linked to assignments where relevant.

References: Bhatt, I. Tufte, E. Poster and evidence sheet.pdf. Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information. An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information.

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information

This includes the ability to read and evaluate its level of accuracy, reliability and bias. When we recently assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, the results definitely got our attention. Unfortunately, over 70 percent of their responses suggested that: Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility.

They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective. Other studies highlight similar shortcomings of high school and college students in these areas. So, what can you do to more explicitly teach adolescents how to evaluate the quality of online information? 1. First, talk with students about the multiple dimensions of critical evaluation. After defining and discussing the dimensions, encourage students to compare and contrast these terms (see Figure 1). Figure 1. Infographic. As we venture into the 21st century, we as a society, are faced with more innovation and challenge than ever before.

Infographic

We now live in an interconnected world, where the Internet and global communications are simultaneously uniting and isolating us as a society. How do we raise critical thinkers to best face the challenges that face our modern society? What changes in education methods should be implemented to create a better learning environment for these budding minds? Check out this great infographic by Mentoring Minds to find out! Click here to download an 11X17 version of the "Developing 21st-Century Critical Thinkers" infographic. Embed This Image On Your Site (copy code below): <div style="clear:both" _mce_style="clear: both;"><a href=" _mce_href=" align="center" src=" _mce_src=" title="Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers" width="900" height="5077" border="0" /></a></div><br/><br/><div>Courtesy of: <a href=" _mce_href=" Minds</a></div>

Digital Literacy

Do Your Students Know How To Search? The Connected Student Series: There is a new digital divide on the horizon.

Do Your Students Know How To Search?

It is not based around who has devices and who does not, but instead the new digital divide will be based around students who know how to effectively find and curate information and those who do not. Helene Blowers has come up with seven ideas about the new digital divide – four of them, the ones I felt related to searching, are listed below.

The New Digital Divide: In an age of information abundance learning to effectively search is one of the most important skills most teachers are NOT teaching. Teachers – especially in the elementary grades -need to develop a shared vocabulary around the skill of searching. Here are some of the searching skills and vocabulary we should be teaching students : Quotation Marks: Students should always use quotes to search for an exact word or set of words. Example: “The Great Chicago Fire” Dashes (or minus sign): Example: Great Chicago Fire -soccer.