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Social Media in Education: Resource Roundup

Social Media in Education: Resource Roundup
Creating Social Media Guidelines A Guidebook for Social Media in the Classroom, by Vicki Davis (2014) Davis, in the first half of a pro-and-con discussion about social media in the classroom, positions it as a vital life skill and provides 12 positive examples of classroom use. For the second half of the discussion, read this post by Ben Johnson: "Too Much Technology and Not Enough Learning?" The Digital Lives of Teens: What Time Is It? Now! by Matt Levinson (2013) In this first installment of his Digital Lives of Teens series, Levinson considers the problem of translating the teenage urgency of 'always on' into the mindfulness of 'being present.' Back to Top Student Engagement With Social Media Tweeting the Read-Aloud: Engaging and Motivating Readers, by Monica Burns (2014) Engage young readers by showing them the value of composing and sending tweets to authors whose books they've enjoyed during a read-aloud. Selecting Social-Media Tools Home, School, and Community Connections Related:  digitalDigital Literacy

How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum So how are we doing on the push to teach “digital literacy” across the K12 school spectrum? From my perspective as a school-based technology coach and history teacher, I’d say not as well as we might wish – in part because our traditional approach to curriculum and instruction wants to sort everything into its place. Digital literacy is defined as “the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate, and create information using a range of digital technologies.” This is often because most institutions already have rigorous, established curricula with little wiggle room – and this is especially true in schools subject to state and federal testing. Evaluating online content is a research skill Administrators often tell me they cannot meet new digital literacy requirements because they cannot add a “digital literacy” course or requirement. For example, when my students do research in US History, they are not only allowed but encouraged to use online content.

Nets Standards Education technology standards to transform learning and teaching The time for major change in education is now. In a world where rapid advances in technology have a profound impact on the ways we work, communicate and live, education has struggled to keep pace. The ISTE Standards work together to support educators, students and leaders with clear guidelines for the skills and knowledge necessary to move away from the factory model. These are not the typical boxes educators need to check. They provide a framework for rethinking education, adapting to a constantly changing technological landscape and preparing students to enter an increasingly global economy. Empowering connected learners in a connected world As educators, we are preparing students for a future that we cannot yet imagine. Want to know more? How can the ISTE Standards be used? Visit permissions and licensing.

Digital Literacy 'Digital literacy is a complex and contested term. It is often understood as the ability to participate in a range of critical and creative practices that involve understanding, sharing and creating meaning with different kinds of technology and media ...' This made me realise that I needed to change my thinking - and the website page! In their computing guide, CAS make it clear that there are three aspects to the new computing curriculum: computer science, information technology and digital literacy. '[All pupils] are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.'

Classroom Management and the Flipped Class Editor's Note:This post was co-authored by Aaron Sams, CEO of Sams Learning Designs, LLC and founding member of the Flipped Learning Network. Let's face it. We teachers spend far too much time and energy trying to keep students quiet so that they can listen to us. We have taken countless courses and workshops on classroom management in our careers, and it seems that the underpinning goal of classroom management is for teachers to keep kids quiet so that they can learn. Is there a better way to think about classroom management? What if the goal of class was for the students to actively engage in the content and participate in tangible ways in the learning process? Noise Is Good As we pioneered the flipped class, we got away from the front of the room and got a whole different perspective on what classroom management could look like. As we did this, the dynamics of the classroom dramatically changed. But, as with any change, we found some new challenges. 4 New Management Issues

Digital Nativism Prensky's Digital Nativism With an insulting tone worthy of the original American nativists who hated immigrants (especially Catholic ones), Marc Prensky speaks of pre-iPod humans (digital immigrants) contemptuously. (Prensky's work) In a rather shallow piece lacking in evidence or data, Prensky offers the terms "digital natives" and "digital immigrants" to set up a generational divide. His proposition is simple-minded. He paints digital experience as wonderful and old ways as worthless. Prensky's Brave New World of Video Game Learning It is amusing to note Prensky's unbridled enthusiasm for learning via video games. Prensky Ignores Serious Studies of the Young and Important Data Quick to stereotype generations, Prensky lumps all young ones together as digital natives even though reports like "Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8–18 Year-0lds" issued by the Kaiser Family Foundation paint a far more complex portrait and base their comments on data gathered through surveys. Fix schools by:

A Universal Framework For Modern Literacy Pedagogy A Universal Framework For Modern Literacy Pedagogy by Terry Heick Why do we need a framework? Literacy instruction has done a relatively poor job of keeping up with the urgent pace of change in the ways people read and write. What’s the big idea? Media evolves. Quick Background The forms most commonly used to communicate (texts, emails, music, articles, video, and film) have increased the quantity of communication. This may be creating a delineation between the “old” (e.g., a novel or poem or essay) and the “new” (e.g., an interactive graphic novel or tweet or video stream). A Definition for Modern Literacy: The ability to both create and extract communication through prevailing local media forms A Definition for Modern Literacy Pedagogy: Helping students create and extract communication through prevailing local media forms Media (plural form of medium): The forms we use as a culture to communicate ideas What about the simple…complex part? What are modalities? A play? A poem? A video game?

Neteducatio Kft. tanároknak. Pedagógus továbbképzés távoktatásban. Digital Literacy & Citizenship Classroom Curriculum NEW! Learn the fundamentals of digital citizenship through choose-your-own-adventure interactive experiences DIGITAL COMPASS - Where are you headed? The only educational game that gives kids the freedom to explore how decisions made in their digital lives can impact their relationships and future. Bring a blended-learning approach to teaching digital citizenship DIGITAL BYTES teaches teens digital citizenship through student-directed, media-rich activities that tackle real-world dilemmas. Teens learn from peers' experiences then create collaborative projects that voice their ideas for making smart choices online. Measure Student Learning with Interactive Assessments We offer THREE WAYS to assess student learning about digital literacy and citizenship. Decorate with Digital Citizenship Classroom Posters Download our colorful POSTERS to remind your students about digital citizenship and device care and maintenance.

Cyberbullying Toolkit An Anti-Cyberbullying Toolkit for Educators This free toolkit has the resources schools need to take an effective stand against cyberbullying. Rely on it to start your year off right. Each occurrence of cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school's culture and community. So how should you handle it? What are the right things to do and say? Even with the best, most proactive intentions to reduce the risks associated with cyberbullying, there will always be times where something does occur. Download our Cyberbullying Response Flowchart.Better understand how your school can activate student compassion to help stop cyberbullying with No Bully.Make sure your students have access to help when they need it the most with the Crisis Text Line Flyers. In partnership with No Bully We have highlighted our cyberbullying lessons for each grade level, along with giving you everything you need to teach engaging lessons for your classroom around this topic. Grades K-5 Lessons

Digital Literacy: Unlocking Technology's Potential | edu@scholastic With 1:1 technology initiatives and BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) programs increasingly being implemented in schools across the globe, the need for digital literacy education has become more important than ever. Although technology enables students to access more information in much less time, it does not always foster learning. Teaching digital literacy helps to manage all of the benefits of technology while helping students understand how to safely weed through the vast amounts of information online. Technology in the classroom has the following advantages: Allows students to manipulate information and media to construct their own meaningsEnables students to share their ideas quickly and easilyEngages students of all cognitive levels and abilitiesPrepares students to be college and career ready These benefits, among others, are why technology has become a major part of the global curriculum. Educators need to embrace the creative and collaborative aspects of digital literacy.

Virtuális egyetem - Papp-Danka Adrienn: A digitális állampolgárság kompetencia alapú modellje The 8 Steps of A Great Digital Storytelling Process March , 2014 Integrating digital storytelling requires more than just knowledge of the web tools to use for creating and sharing digital stories, the process if much more important. Helping kids and students learn through the use of digital storytelling entails the implementation of a well-paced plan that clearly outlines both the objectives and expectations behind this integration. Samantha Morra (Google certified teacher) has this wonderful visual on the process of digital storytelling. This process comprises 8 steps : Come with an ideaResearch/explore and learnWrite/ScriptStoryboard/PlanGather/create images, gather/create audio, gather create video.Put it all togetherShareFeedback and reflect If you are looking for some web tools for teaching digital storytelling, I would recommend this page.

Another great source of references by dkherning Jan 20

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