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Developing digital literacies

Overview Many learners enter further and higher education lacking the skills needed to apply digital technologies to education. As 90% of new jobs will require excellent digital skills, improving digital literacy is an essential component of developing employable graduates. Courses that embed core digital skills, as well as subject specific use of technology, enable students to gain the skills and confidence they need to use digital technology not only to support their learning but also in the workplace. We’re working with colleges and universities to embed core digital skills into the curriculum. By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society: for example, the skills to use digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; as part of personal development planning; and as a way of showcasing achievements. Developing Digital Literacies programme

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning/developingdigitalliteracies.aspx

Study of how UK FE and HE institutions are supporting effective learners in a digital age (SLiDA) Download the final report1 The final report has recommendations for further and higher education on how to develop effective institution-wide strategies and practices which better support effective learners in a digital age. Download the case studies2 See a report of the methodology3 used to create the case studies and the appendices4 Overview This project has been examining how UK further and higher education institutions are supporting learners for a digital age.

Transliteracy Research Group At 3Ts 2013: Transliteracy from Cradle to Career in Saratoga Springs this week I learned some new things about transliteracy. 1. In What I Want, When I Want to Watch It: Brief Thoughts on Television Literacy in the Streaming World with Hollie Miller & Michele Forte, Hollie aka @theotherinside showed us a feature on Hulu Plus which allows you to choose between adverts. JISC Digital Literacies programme: A history of Digital Literacy in UK & EU #JISCDigLit — Digital Fingerprint Sarah Payton & Tabetha Newman The EU describes it as digital competency. Lots of debate about what it is, but if we’re talking policy at institutions, it’s important to know what you are seeking to implement. Recommended books: Great (simple) definition of digital literacies: Arguments against “digital natives”:

www.nesta.org.uk/library/documents/DecodingLearningReport_v12.pdf Our Decoding Learning report looks at the impact of digital technology in the classroom. Key findings Schools spent £487 million on ICT equipment and services in 2009-2010. But this investment has not yet resulted in radical improvements to learning experiences or attainment.No technology has an impact on learning on its own right; impact depends on how it is used. Rather than categorising innovations by the type of technology used (eg, do games help learning?), it’s more useful to think about the types of learning activities we know to be effective, such as practising key skills, and exploring how tech can support these activities.We identify eight learning themes that show significant promise of impact when combined with digital technology.

Grant 4/11 - Call for projects in developing digital literacies JISC invites institutions to submit funding proposals for projects to support the development and implementation of institutional approaches to digital literacies across the entire workforce and including students. Total funding of up to £1,000,000 is available for 10 to 12 two year projects funded at up to £100,000 each. The deadline for proposals is 12 noon UK time on Wednesday, 8 June 2011. Developing digital literacy in higher education: live chat The popularity of the Guardian's digital literacy campaign shows not only how much interest there is in this topic but also how much misunderstanding there is about what digital literacy is, or what purpose it serves. So what is digital literacy? In a blog for the us, JISC InfoNet researcher Doug Belshaw, describes the digitally literate as knowing how the web works, understanding how ideas spread through networks and able to use digital tools to work purposefully towards a pre-specified goal.

Connectivism and the modern learner Recently, I read a blog article about connectivism by Debora Gallo. Soon after, I attended a presentation about m-learning by Jan Herrington, in which she too mentioned connectivism. This got me thinking… I don’t know anything about connectivism! So after several hours of unenlightened googling, I decided to bite the bullet, go back to first principles and read George Siemens’ seminal paper, Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. Theoretical foundations Cambridge University Library Emma Coonan and Jane Secker Information literacy is widely recognised as a key part of lifelong independent learning. It has been defined as "... knowing when and why you need information, where to find it, and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner." (CILIP, 2004) Meanwhile UNESCO take a broader view that goes beyond learning, stating that: Information literacy empowers people in all walks of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupational and educational goals. It is a basic human right in a digital world and promotes social inclusion in all nations.

20 ways of thinking about digital literacy in higher education Josie Fraser, social and educational technologist, Leicester City Council First define what you mean by digital literacy: The definition I most frequently use is this one: digital literacy = digital tool knowledge + critical thinking + social engagement. Then it's worth knowing its main characteristics:

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