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Developing digital literacies

Overview Many learners enter further and higher education lacking the skills needed to apply digital technologies to education. As 90% of new jobs will require excellent digital skills, improving digital literacy is an essential component of developing employable graduates. Courses that embed core digital skills, as well as subject specific use of technology, enable students to gain the skills and confidence they need to use digital technology not only to support their learning but also in the workplace. We’re working with colleges and universities to embed core digital skills into the curriculum. By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society: for example, the skills to use digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; as part of personal development planning; and as a way of showcasing achievements. Developing Digital Literacies programme

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/elearning/developingdigitalliteracies.aspx

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21st Century Citizenship A Vision for 21st Century Citizenship The ways in which Americans, as citizens, engage in their communities, their country and the world are changing and expanding. The challenges of being a responsible, effective citizen are more diverse, nuanced and complex than in the past. Sustaining our democracy, strengthening economic competitiveness and meeting local, state, national and global challenges demands a broader vision of citizenship for the 21st century. MOOCs take their place in the corporate learning world According a report released by Technavio, the corporate e-learning market in the USA is predicted to reach a value of nearly $31 billion by 2020. Much of this can be attributed to the rapid advancement of technology, like mobile devices and cloud-based learning systems. Now, corporate learning is expanding to include free and low-cost learning opportunities to help bring more information into the workplace. A background on MOOCs

Developing digital literacies 'By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society. For example, the use of digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; digital professionalism; the use of specialist digital tools and data sets; communicating ideas effectively in a range of media; producing, sharing and critically evaluating information; collaborating in virtual networks; using digital technologies to support reflection and PDP; managing digital reputation and showcasing achievements.' Developing Digital Literacies was a two-year Jisc-funded programme (2011-2013) to promote the development of coherent, inclusive approaches to digital capability across institutions of further and higher education. This 'home' page provides access to the activities and outcomes of the programme.

DIGITAL LITERACY As described in the last several postings, the challenge with the creation of a standards-based curriculum for Digital Literacy education is not too few standards to work from but too many. In the US alone, nearly all fifty states have created standards for K-12 technology education. And while they may all share high-level correlation with ISTE NETS (the closest things we have to a national standard), when you get into the details these state-level standards differ considerably. Once you add higher education standards, international standards and standards created by researchers (not to mention the research-based pedagogies created by book and courseware publishers), suddenly the three-part Digital Literacy model , which may represent a consensus in the abstract, becomes far more diverse in the particular.

Social Bookmarking with students: Quality not quantity! Knowing how to organise, filter, research, evaluate and bookmark resources online is a valuable skill for students to gain. However, we can’t assume giving students access to a social bookmark tool means they’ll know what’s expected or will gain the necessary skills. This guest post by Donal O’ Mahony shares his experience and advice using social bookmarking with students. Image by The iconoclastic yet iconic ionic icon licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0

The Future of Higher Education? Ask the Magic-8 Ball! Want to know the future of higher education in this age of disruption? Forget all those committees, commissions, and "futurists." Just ask the Magic-8 Ball! Is competency-based education the real disruption we have all been waiting for? Will MOOCs undermine traditional undergraduate enrollments? Author discusses new book, 'The Uberfication of the University' How much do Uber, Airbnb and other elements of the "sharing economy" explain the state of higher education? Quite a lot, according to Gary Hall, professor of media and performing arts at Coventry University, in Britain. He outlines his views in The Uberfication of the University, a short book (55 pages) published as part of the University of Minnesota Press Forerunners series on new ideas. Hall responded via email to questions about his book. Q: Many of the trends you reference (reliance on adjuncts who lack job security, state disinvestment in higher education) predate Uber and the sharing economy.

Digital Literacy – delivering the agenda within colleges and universities at JISC On Air Episode 6: Delivering Digital Literacy- delivering the agenda within colleges and universities (Duration: 21:34) Listen now Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunes Download MP3 Read the show transcript Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action The Knight Commission recognized that people need tools, skills and understanding to use information effectively, and that successful participation in the digital age entails two kinds of skills sets: digital literacy and media literacy. Digital literacy means learning how to work the information and communication technologies in a networked environment, as well as understanding the social, cultural and ethical issues that go along with the use of these technologies. Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, create, reflect upon, and act with the information products that media disseminate.

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