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3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student

3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student
Thinking in the 21st century is just different. That doesn’t mean we’re all suddenly omnipotent cyborgs, nor does it mean we’ve all become mindless social media addicts that spend our cognitive might tapping, swiping, and drooling on our smartphone and tablet screens. But just as the 19th century presented unique challenges to information processing than the 18th or 20th, the 21st century is different than the one before, or that the one that will come after. punyamishra.com recently released the following graphic that I thought was interesting, mainly in that it identified knowledge types for modern learning, settling on Foundational, Humanistic, and Meta Knowledge. 3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student 1. Digital/ICT Literacy, Core Content Knowledge, Cross-disciplinary Knowledge 2. Life/Job Skills, Ethical/Emotional Awareness, Cultural Competence 3. Creativity and Innovation, Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking, Communication and Collaboration Using This Model In Your Classroom

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/3-knowledge-domains-for-the-21st-century-student/

Related:  21st Century Learners21st Century Learning- New literaciesDigital Literacy

Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence Big Ideas In “Thirteen Ways of Looking At A Blackbird,” poet Wallace Stevens takes something familiar—an ordinary black bird—and by looking at it from many different perspectives, makes us think about it in new ways. With apologies to Stevens, we’re going to take the same premise, but change the subject by considering eight ways of looking at intelligence—eight perspectives provided by the science of learning. A few words about that term: The science of learning is a relatively new discipline born of an agglomeration of fields: cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience. Its project is to apply the methods of science to human endeavors—teaching and learning—that have for centuries been mostly treated as an art. As with anything to do with our idiosyncratic and unpredictable species, there is still a lot of art involved in teaching and learning.

4 Essential Rules Of 21st Century Learning 4 Essential Rules Of 21st Century Learning by Jennifer Rita Nichols The term “21st century” has become an integral part of educational thinking and planning for the future. Educators and administrators are actively searching for ways to prepare students for the future, and the educational system has been evolving faster than ever before. Various studies have shown us that rote memorization is not an effective learning strategy, and that teacher-centered classrooms may not be the most efficiently structured ones for student engagement. However, despite learning about the skills that students will need to develop to become successful in the 21st century, as well as what beliefs about education may be worth hanging onto or throwing away, schools and teachers are left trying to figure out what their role needs to be in the education of their 21st century students.

educatorstechnology: The 7 Important Literacies of The 21st Century Education I have been studying literacy for more than a year in my Literacy Education MAEd program and have also written a 12 pages research paper on it but each time I sit down to write about it I discover a lot of new insights. Literacy is a deceptively broad topic that can be approached from various lenses. Schoolars from Plato to James Paul Gee have extensively written on the topic, each arguing for the validity of the theoretical lens through which they see it. Going through these theories I find myself inclining more to the progressivist camp or the " New Literacies" camp.

63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World 63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World by Terry Heick It could be argued—and probably argued well—that what a student fundamentally needs to know today isn’t much different than what Tom Sawyer or Joan of Arc or Alexander the Great needed to know. Communication. The Basics of Self-Directed Learning for Teachers What is self-directed learning all about ? There are a variety of definitions as to what SDL is all about and going through all of them I found that Knowles has been very articulate in the way he defined SDL. “In its broadest meaning, ’self-directed learning’ describes a process by which individuals take the initiative, with our without the assistance of others, in diagnosing their learning needs, formulating learning goals, identify human and material resources for learning, choosing and implement appropriate learning strategies, and evaluating learning outcomes.”

25 Critical Thinking Strategies For The Modern Learner Critical thinking is the engine of learning. Within this complex process or so many other relevant themes that contribute to learning: creativity, analysis, evaluation, innovation, application, and scores of other verbs from various learning taxonomies. So the following infographic from Mentoring Minds is immediately relevant to all educators, and students as well. It’s a bit of a mash of Habits of Mind, various 21st century learning frameworks, and the aforementioned learning taxonomies, promoting collaboration, problem-solving, and real-world connections (standard “critical thinking fare” with Habits of Mind-sounding phrases such as “Open-Mindedness”). At the bottom, it pushes a bit further, however, offering 25 critical thinking strategies to help support progressive learning. While a few are a bit vague (#12 says to “Think critically daily,” and #17 is simply “Well-informed”), overall the graphic does pool together several important themes into a single image.

The Best Research Demonstrating That Lectures Are Not The Best Instructional Strategy There has been a fair amount of recent research documenting the ineffectiveness of lectures as an instructional strategy. I thought I’d bring articles about the research together in one place. You might also be interested in The Best Posts Questioning If Direct Instruction Is “Clearly Superior.” Let me know what I’m missing here: A study was just announced a couple of years ago claiming — surprise, surprise — that integrating pair work and small groups in teaching is more effective than straight lectures.

educatorstechnology: Digital Literacy Simply Explained Common Craft has recently rolled out a new video in which leefever explained what digital literacy is all about. I love Leefevr video explanations and I think students will find them much easier to follow and comprehend. Literacy is the first human invention that has transformed the human life forever. It is thanks to literacy that human thinking developed to include more abstract and syllogistic concepts which constituted the foundational pillars of science. 4 Principals Of Digital Literacy Literacy Literacy is the ability to make sense of something, often generalized as the ability to read and write. In many ways, reading is reading, media is media, but in the same way a play places unique comprehension demands on a reader compared to a poem or a letter, so do digital media compared to classic media forms. In the 21st century, new literacies are emerging and digital media forms allow communication to be more nuanced than ever before. Digital Literacy Digital Literacy is about being able to make sense of digital media.

27 Tips For Becoming A Digital Teacher The term ’21st century teacher’ has been met with a bit of backlash over the past year or so. I’ve seen it pop up all over the place (including Edudemic of course) as a term to describe a ‘modern’ or ‘connected’ or ‘digital’ teacher. Basically, we all seem to trying to find the best term for a teacher who uses technology to enhance learning. Since that is quickly becoming the vast majority of teachers in many countries, there almost seems to be no reason to have a different name for something like this. So I’ll just stick with ‘digital teacher’ and move on.

Survey: Learning '21st-Century Skills' Linked to Work Success - Teaching Now A study released today by the polling firm Gallup Inc. finds that students' exposure to so-called 21st-century skills in school correlates positively with "perceived quality of work" later in life . For the study, which was commissioned by Microsoft Partners in Learning and the Pearson Foundation, Gallup asked 1,014 individuals aged 18 to 35 how much experience they had with certain advanced learning skills during their last year of school, including college or graduate school, if applicable. (Cognitive testing conducted by Gallup prior to the survey determined that individuals at the upper end of the age range would have comparable recall of their last school year.) The skills in question—often dubbed 21st-century skills because of their reputed connection to present-day workplace demands—included collaboration, knowledge construction, global awareness, use of technology for learning, real-world problem solving, and skilled communication.

Ten Reasons People Resist Change - Rosabeth Moss Kanter by Rosabeth Moss Kanter | 12:00 PM September 25, 2012 Leadership is about change, but what is a leader to do when faced with ubiquitous resistance? Resistance to change manifests itself in many ways, from foot-dragging and inertia to petty sabotage to outright rebellions. educatorstechnology: Two Awesome Presentations on Digital Literacy for Teachers Literacy is a concept that is really hard to define or contain within a single semiotic field. There are also divisive views over the meaning of literacy. The traditional camp views it as the basic ability to read and write; encoding and decoding meaning from chunks of text or verbal output. On the other hand, the progressivists look at it from a different angle. For them, literacy is not divorced from the social context in which it is conceived of. Therefore, to talk about a single literacy is analogous to saying there is only one group of people populating this planet.

How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum So how are we doing on the push to teach “digital literacy” across the K12 school spectrum? From my perspective as a school-based technology coach and history teacher, I’d say not as well as we might wish – in part because our traditional approach to curriculum and instruction wants to sort everything into its place. Digital literacy is defined as “the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate, and create information using a range of digital technologies.”

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