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Learning 2.0 is Dumb: Use ‘Connected Learning’ Instead

Learning 2.0 is Dumb: Use ‘Connected Learning’ Instead
Going forward, and as best I can, I’ll use the term ‘Connected Learning’ to describe a knowledge ecosystem made up of formal, informal and social learning behaviours and modalities. It’s about time I (and perhaps you as well) retire the term Learning 2.0. There are a few reasons for this: Therefore, I present to you ‘Connected Learning’ … at least from a modality perspective: If ‘Connected Learning’ is part formal, part informal and part social, there will always be the act of ‘connecting’ one’s self to people, content, systems, networks, etc. during the learning process itself … and it may occur through several mediums. Formal: a self-contained & scheduled learning event, typically but not always tracked, providing a comprehensive and at times logical or sequential approach to a topic. Informal: an opportunity without conventionalism, atypical to formal learning, providing guidance, expertise or acumen on the go. ‘Connected Learning’ leans heavily on Socratic Learning as well: Related:  Connectedconectes learning

From E-Learning to We-Learning The corporate training industry is undergoing some major changes. Over last few months we have been involved in many discussions with organizations about the tremendous needs to build, manage, and formalize their social and collaborative learning programs. This is being driven by many factors: the slowing economy, the "always-connected" nature of the workforce, and the explosion of social software tools and platforms now available. In many ways, this transition is very similar to the last "big thing" to hit corporate training - the "e-learning" era. The word "e-learning" started in 1998 and we went through a radical change in thinking about training over the next 10 years. I think today's transformation is very similar and we have much we can learn from that history. The History of E-Learning and What We Learned E-learning radically changed the training industry. Today of course as e-learning has matured, there are many forms of online training and education. Enter "We-Learning" 1. 2. 3.

Connected Learning Principles We are living in a historical moment of transformation and realignment in the creation and sharing of knowledge, in social, political and economic life, and in global connectedness. There is wide agreement that we need new models of education suited to this historic moment, and not simply new models of schooling, but entirely new visions of learning better suited to the increasing complexity, connectivity, and velocity of our new knowledge society. Fortunately, we are also able to harness the same technologies and social processes that have powered these transformations in order to provide the next generation with learning experiences that open doors to academic achievement, economic opportunity, and civic engagement. What would it mean to think of education as a responsibility of a distributed network of people and institutions, including schools, libraries, museums and online communities? At the core of connected learning are three values:

Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models DML (a “Digital Media and Learning” project), believes in the “the power of participation.” And they’ve created a learning model overview to prove it. We recently published our Inside-Out Learning model, an attempt to return the learning to the families, organizations, and communities authentic to the learner. DML’s model is similar in philosophy, underscoring the role of interdependence. Connected Learning “is an answer to three key shifts as society evolves from the industrial age of the 20th century and its one-size-fits-all factory approach to educating youth to a 21st century networked society.” 1) A shift from education to learning. 2) A shift from consumption of information to participatory learning. 3) A shift from institutions to networks.

Connected Learning Visually Explained for Teachers We have been talking a lot about the connected educator in the previous posts because we are in a month that is officially labelled the Connected Educator month, however, today we will have a cursory look into another closely related topic: connected learning. Connected learning is a learning theory that is a set of conceptions and ideas about the nature of learning. This theory, as is indicated in the graphic below, works towards making learning a collaborative task built through the participation of different parts. Connected learning also draws on the diversity of experiences, interests, and contexts in which learners participate.According to this theory, this diversity of the learners experiences increases the learning potential. At the centre of any connected learning are three values : The graphic below features all of these ideas.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Connected Learning Explained Are we really taking advantage of this digital information age to enhance the quality of today's education? Are we keeping pace with the fast-changing learning styles of our students? Do we know when, how, and what technology to use in our classrooms ? Do schools and curricula facilitate the integration of such technology ? These and many other similar questions are in the core of the present debate about the kind of education students need to success in a digitally focused world. We are preparing students for jobs that do not exist yet but unfortunately some of us are still using old fashioned techniques. Connected Learning: 'ESSENCE' from DML Research Hub on Vimeo.

A Day in the Life of a Connected Educator – Using social media in 21st century classrooms One of our main goals at Powerful Learning Practice is to turn educators into 21st Century educators. That is, teach them how to use social media and other powerful Web 2.0 tools to transform their classrooms into learning environments that are ready for today’s iGeneration students. One of the most common questions we get is, “But where do we find the time to use all this new technology?” To answer that question, we developed this infographic – A Day in the Life of a Connected Educator to show that using social media in your classroom and in your life can be integrated, easy, and fun. Scroll down and take a look or click for a larger version. Get connected Would you like to become a connected educator? Explore more about the life of a Connected Educator and 21st Century teacher & learner in The Connected Educator: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age by Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach and Lani Ritter Hall. Tweet all about it What does a typical day in a 21st century classroom look like?

Educators: Embrace Social Media What is up with teacher development and the fear of social media? So many educators are soaring into the next advent of learning, while others continue to lecture and talk at the kids, avoiding the digital tools that are so readily available. Yesterday, in a passing conversation discussing sharing of great resources, I asked a colleague if they knew what a PLN is? ”Huh?” she said. My world has become immersed in Twitter; I find it to be one of the single most important tools in my own daily professional development. I’d like to mention some of my educationally revered friends and give them a little plug since they have helped me grow. Now, don’t get me wrong… my friends on Twitter are more like colleagues. 25 Ways To Get The Most Out Of Twitter by Jeff Dunn (just posted yesterday so we must have had some mental telepathy going on.) the founder of Edudemic, states that, Twitter may very well be the single most important tool for teachers right now. Here’s what I think:

The Case for Connected Learning A lot of my classmates don t get the importance of working with each other. You know, you spend all that time in high school where you re told to write an essay and you don t get much back besides a graded essay. s it. But early on in college I had this professor who didn t just put a grade on my paper. d say, This is great but have you thought about this? Suddenly I saw that getting feedback, not just from one person but a lot of other people, would be extremely helpful. I was nervous about taking an online class, because I understand how important interaction and group work is, but if anything this online course has had more opportunities for participation than any other class I ve taken. I get a little frustrated when I post and all I get for comments is three classmates telling me Oh, that s so great! I want to have a discussion, and that s not a discussion. But there are so many other people in this open forum commenting on my posts too. s not like just having one teacher, it m doing. I think I . It

¿Por qué es tan importante la #colaboración? ¿Qué es y cómo funciona? Allá por 2008 escribíamos en ergonomic sobre una charla que Andrew Keen daba en el Oxford Internet Institute. En esos días, Keen ironizaba lo que entonces llamaba: “… las tres “C” que promueve el evangelio de Silicon Valley: colaboración, comunidad y conversación…”. Desde entonces hasta ahora muchos bits han pasado bajo nuestros teclados. Sin embargo, aunque mucho ha ocurrido entre el ’08 y ’13 aún queda bastante por explorar y precisar en cuanto a qué entendemos por colaboración, comunidad y conversación. En conversación con un alumni de Outliers School surgió la idea de pensar en un simple pero inclusivo diagrama cartesiano que interrelacionara las dimensiones de aprendizaje individual, colectivo, formal e informal. Un claro ejemplo de su importancia se observa en la prueba escolar parametrizada de la OCDE (conocida como PISA) que a partir del 2015 comenzará a evaluar: “Collaborative problem solving (computer based)“. 1. 2. 3. 4. [Referencias abajo] * W. ****Himanen, P. (2010).

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