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Learning 2.0 is Dumb: Use ‘Connected Learning’ Instead

Learning 2.0 is Dumb: Use ‘Connected Learning’ Instead
Going forward, and as best I can, I’ll use the term ‘Connected Learning’ to describe a knowledge ecosystem made up of formal, informal and social learning behaviours and modalities. It’s about time I (and perhaps you as well) retire the term Learning 2.0. There are a few reasons for this: Therefore, I present to you ‘Connected Learning’ … at least from a modality perspective: If ‘Connected Learning’ is part formal, part informal and part social, there will always be the act of ‘connecting’ one’s self to people, content, systems, networks, etc. during the learning process itself … and it may occur through several mediums. Formal: a self-contained & scheduled learning event, typically but not always tracked, providing a comprehensive and at times logical or sequential approach to a topic. Informal: an opportunity without conventionalism, atypical to formal learning, providing guidance, expertise or acumen on the go. ‘Connected Learning’ leans heavily on Socratic Learning as well: Related:  Connectedconectes learning

Educational Video: The Top Cultural & Educational Video Sites Looking for great cultural and educational video? Then you’ve come to the right place. Below, we have compiled a list of 46 sites that feature intelligent videos. This list was produced with the help of our faithful readers, and it will grow over time. ABC Documentaries: This site pulls together some of the best documentaries aired on ABC television in Australia. Academic Earth: Some call this “the Hulu for education.” Arkive.org: The site gathers together “the very best films and photographs of the world’s species into one centralised digital library, to create a unique audio-visual record of life on Earth.” Australian Screen Archive: The Australian National Film and Sound Archive provides free and worldwide access to over 1,000 film and television titles – a treasury of down-under video 100 years in the making. BigIdeas: This show, which comes out of Canada, “offers a variety of thought-provoking topics which range across politics, culture, economics, art history, science…. Pop!

What is Connected Learning Ninth-grader Charles Raben has seen first-hand that by connecting the many spheres of his life -- peers, interests and academic pursuits -- new learning experiences can and will present themselves in both organized and unstructured ways. In the summer of 2012, Charles utilized his photography skills and the petition website Change.org to capture and share the story of Jerry Delakas, a longtime local newsstand operator who was in danger of losing his New York City license over a technicality. "I wanted to have that experience of creating change myself." The petition-making process proved to be a life-changing learning experience for the teen. Charles has become even more engaged in school, and all of his academic work is improving as a result of all of these activities because he has an identity now. A single sentence on his photography blog eloquently bares this newfound identity: "Each face tells a story and I try to capture just that."

From E-Learning to We-Learning The corporate training industry is undergoing some major changes. Over last few months we have been involved in many discussions with organizations about the tremendous needs to build, manage, and formalize their social and collaborative learning programs. This is being driven by many factors: the slowing economy, the "always-connected" nature of the workforce, and the explosion of social software tools and platforms now available. In many ways, this transition is very similar to the last "big thing" to hit corporate training - the "e-learning" era. The word "e-learning" started in 1998 and we went through a radical change in thinking about training over the next 10 years. I think today's transformation is very similar and we have much we can learn from that history. The History of E-Learning and What We Learned E-learning radically changed the training industry. Today of course as e-learning has matured, there are many forms of online training and education. Enter "We-Learning" 1. 2. 3.

Connected Learning Principles We are living in a historical moment of transformation and realignment in the creation and sharing of knowledge, in social, political and economic life, and in global connectedness. There is wide agreement that we need new models of education suited to this historic moment, and not simply new models of schooling, but entirely new visions of learning better suited to the increasing complexity, connectivity, and velocity of our new knowledge society. Fortunately, we are also able to harness the same technologies and social processes that have powered these transformations in order to provide the next generation with learning experiences that open doors to academic achievement, economic opportunity, and civic engagement. What would it mean to think of education as a responsibility of a distributed network of people and institutions, including schools, libraries, museums and online communities? At the core of connected learning are three values:

Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age December 12, 2004 George Siemens Update (April 5, 2005): I've added a website to explore this concept at www.connectivism.ca Introduction Behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism are the three broad learning theories most often utilized in the creation of instructional environments. Learners as little as forty years ago would complete the required schooling and enter a career that would often last a lifetime. “One of the most persuasive factors is the shrinking half-life of knowledge. Some significant trends in learning: Many learners will move into a variety of different, possibly unrelated fields over the course of their lifetime. Background Driscoll (2000) defines learning as “a persisting change in human performance or performance potential…[which] must come about as a result of the learner’s experience and interaction with the world” (p.11). Driscoll (2000, p14-17) explores some of the complexities of defining learning. Conclusion:

5 Powerful Common Core Tools For The Connected Educator With forty-five states plus Washington DC and four territories adopting the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), I’m a little surprised educators are still questioning the benefits of becoming a connected educator. I’ve enjoyed the privilege of serving as the Elementary School Principal in Boyne City, Michigan for 13 years. I became a principal because I believe in the power of visionary leadership. I love what happens when you get a group of individuals behind an idea and working towards a common set of goals. I’ve enjoyed a relatively seamless transition to the CCSS thanks to a hard-working and dedicated teaching staff. Some of the tools we’ve found to be most effective for fostering these connections include the use of Twitter , Edmodo , iTunes U , YouTube , and Google Hangouts . Twitter Twitter is the engine that drives many individual’s PLN. Edmodo Often referred to as the Facebook of education, Edmodo is a social learning platform designed for teachers, students and parents. YouTube

Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models DML (a “Digital Media and Learning” project), believes in the “the power of participation.” And they’ve created a learning model overview to prove it. We recently published our Inside-Out Learning model, an attempt to return the learning to the families, organizations, and communities authentic to the learner. DML’s model is similar in philosophy, underscoring the role of interdependence. Connected Learning “is an answer to three key shifts as society evolves from the industrial age of the 20th century and its one-size-fits-all factory approach to educating youth to a 21st century networked society.” 1) A shift from education to learning. 2) A shift from consumption of information to participatory learning. 3) A shift from institutions to networks.

Connected Learning Visually Explained for Teachers We have been talking a lot about the connected educator in the previous posts because we are in a month that is officially labelled the Connected Educator month, however, today we will have a cursory look into another closely related topic: connected learning. Connected learning is a learning theory that is a set of conceptions and ideas about the nature of learning. This theory, as is indicated in the graphic below, works towards making learning a collaborative task built through the participation of different parts. Connected learning also draws on the diversity of experiences, interests, and contexts in which learners participate.According to this theory, this diversity of the learners experiences increases the learning potential. At the centre of any connected learning are three values : The graphic below features all of these ideas.

9 of the coolest educational videos from TED-Ed By Lauren Granger on 30 April, 2012 398 Share When TED launched its educational website for younger students last week, I think teachers everywhere realised they had to up their game. The 3-10 minute videos are designed to encourage curiosity and show how the world works using compelling animation and the audible explanations of a gifted teacher. Even if you’re not in high school, the videos are sometimes fascinating, sometimes kinda strange, but generally very cool. How Simple Ideas Lead to Scientific Discoveries How can you not wish that Mythbusters’ Adam Savage was your science teacher? Just How Small is an Atom? Ok, so this one is kind of brain-warping. The Cockroach Beatbox If you can get past the part where neuroscientist Greg Gage dismembers a cockroach, you will never forget how electrical energy moves your limbs ever again. How Folding Paper Can Get You to the Moon How Many Universes are There? The Real Origin of the Franchise Ah, good question. 398

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