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How Companies Learn Your Secrets

How Companies Learn Your Secrets

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/19/magazine/shopping-habits.html?pagewanted=all

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How Big Data Gets Real The business of Big Data, which involves collecting large amounts of data and then searching it for patterns and new revelations, is the result of cheap storage, abundant sensors and new software. It has become a multibillion-dollar industry in less than a decade. Growing at speed like that, it is easy to miss how much remains to do before the industry has proven standards. Until then, lots of customers are probably wasting much of their money.

5 Shocking Ways The World Is About To Change First off, fuck the apocalypse and everybody who predicts it. There's always an apocalypse somewhere, and our pop culture's obsession with an America ruined by war/disease/starvation basically boils down to, "Can you imagine if the shit that's constantly happening in the Third World happened to us?" There's somebody out there living the social breakdown of The Walking Dead right now. Only instead of zombies, it's some warlord's death squads, and a crossbow won't do shit. No, this article is about the future, but isn't about the apocalypse or a dystopia -- this isn't about killer robots (which we already have!) or a looming American police state.

New police radars can 'see' inside homes Radar devices allowing officers to detect movement through walls have been secretly used by at least 50 U.S. law enforcement agencies over the last two years. VPC WASHINGTON — At least 50 U.S. law enforcement agencies have secretly equipped their officers with radar devices that allow them to effectively peer through the walls of houses to see whether anyone is inside, a practice raising new concerns about the extent of government surveillance. Those agencies, including the FBI and the U.S. Marshals Service, began deploying the radar systems more than two years ago with little notice to the courts and no public disclosure of when or how they would be used.

Understanding Privacy Online: Development of a Social Contract Approach to Privacy Acquisti, A., & Grossklags, J. (2005). Privacy and rationality in decision making. IEEE Security and Privacy,3(1), 26–33.CrossRefAlbergotti, R. (2014b, July 2). Launching Blackboard Collaborate Start Session Optionally, you can pre-configure your computer and test your audio using one of our Configuration Rooms prior to your session. Please visit our "First time Users" section in the Support Portal to view configuration rooms for Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing.

Factual’s Gil Elbaz Wants to Gather the Data Universe FACTUAL sells data to corporations and independent software developers on a sliding scale, based on how much the information is used. Small data feeds for things like prototypes are free; contracts with its biggest customers run into the millions. Sometimes, Factual trades data with other companies, building its resources. Supreme Court: DNA swab after arrest is legitimate search The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court sit for their official photograph on October 8, 2010, at the Supreme Court. Front row, from left: Clarence Thomas, Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Anthony M. Kennedy and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Kyllo v. United States Kyllo v. United States, 533 U.S. 27 (2001), held that the use of a thermal imaging, or FLIR, device from a public vantage point to monitor the radiation of heat from a person's home was a "search" within the meaning of the Fourth Amendment, and thus required a warrant. Facts[edit] Department of the Interior used a thermal imaging device outside of Danny Lee Kyllo's home in Florence, Oregon. According to the District Court that presided over Kyllo's evidentiary hearing, the device could not "penetrate walls or windows to reveal conversations or human activities.

Cyber-Security: Protecting your data - NZ Law Society “Information is everything,” Bill Clinton said in the 90s. “We live in a data economy,” acting Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) director Una Jagose said last month. You’ve probably heard something similar before, and for no profession is it likely more true than for law. Law is about information.

About Target, statistics, and pregnancy by steventang Feb 20

.... One study from Duke University estimated that habits, rather than conscious decision-making, shape 45 percent of the choices we make every day, and recent discoveries have begun to change everything from the way we think about dieting to how doctors conceive treatments for anxiety, depression and addictions." by pattychanman Feb 17

"The reason Target can snoop on our shopping habits is that, over the past two decades, the science of habit formation has become a major field of research in neurology and psychology departments at hundreds of major medical centers and universities, as well as inside extremely well financed corporate labs. “It’s like an arms race to hire statisticians nowadays,” said Andreas Weigend, the former chief scientist at Amazon.com. “Mathematicians are suddenly sexy.” As the ability to analyze data has grown more and more fine-grained, the push to understand how daily habits influence our decisions has become one of the most exciting topics in clinical research, even though most of us are hardly aware those patterns exist... by pattychanman Feb 17

Also linked to your Guest ID is demographic information like your age, whether you are married and have kids, which part of town you live in, how long it takes you to drive to the store, your estimated salary, whether you’ve moved recently, what credit cards you carry in your wallet and what Web sites you visit. Target can buy data about your ethnicity, job history, the magazines you read, if you’ve ever declared bankruptcy or got divorced, the year you bought (or lost) your house, where you went to college, what kinds of topics you talk about online, whether you prefer certain brands of coffee, paper towels, cereal or applesauce, your political leanings, reading habits, charitable giving and the number of cars you own. (In a statement, Target declined to identify what demographic information it collects or purchases.) All that information is meaningless, however, without someone to analyze and make sense of it. That’s where the members of Guest Marketing Analytics department come in." by pattychanman Feb 17

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