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David Birch: Identity without a name

David Birch: Identity without a name

Ring Could Log Users In to Houses, Phones and Website as Soon as Next Month The need for more passwords that our feeble human brains struggle to remember can make it feel like we work for the machines instead of the other way around. Wearable, and even embeddable, login storage has emerged has a possible solution. After Google researchers floated the idea of a USB stick or a ring that would generate login keys, it appeared the Web giant would lead the way. But a UK project recently closed a $380,000 Kickstarter campaign, promising delivery of 61,000 password-bearing rings in September. The company, NFC Ring, makes a simple silver ring with two near-field communication transmitters inside it, storing access information that can potentially be used to unlock phones, cars or houses or even to log in to websites. One transmitter faces out and stores information that the user may want to share, such as his or her contact information. Users won’t have to charge or update the rings because the transmitters are passive. Images courtesy NFC Ring

Facebook privacy and kids: Don’t post photos of your kids online Photo by Hemera/Thinkstock I vividly remember the Facebook post. It was my friend’s 5-year-old daughter “Kate,” (a pseudonym) standing outside of her house in a bright yellow bikini, the street address clearly visible behind her on the front door. A caption read “Leaving for our annual Labor Day weekend at the beach,” and beneath it were more than 50 likes and comments from friends—including many “friends” that Kate’s mom barely knew. The picture had been uploaded to a Facebook album, and there were 114 shots just of Kate: freshly cleaned and swaddled on the day of her birth … giving her Labradoodle a kiss … playing on a swing set. I completely understood her parents’ desire to capture Kate’s everyday moments, because early childhood is so ephemeral. Last week, Facebook updated its privacy policy again. Six thousand respondents to Slate’s survey show a clear trend. The problem is that Facebook is only one site. That poses some obvious challenges for Kate’s future self.

Google deliberately stole information but executives 'covered it up' for years Work of Street View cars to be examined over allegations Google used them to download personal detailsEmails, texts, photos and documents taken from wi-fi networks as cars photographed British roadsEngineer who designed software said a privacy lawyer should be consultedCalls for police and Information Commissioner to investigate new evidence By Jack Doyle and Daniel Bates Published: 11:50 GMT, 27 May 2012 | Updated: 11:06 GMT, 29 May 2012 Google, pictured street-mapping in Bristol, has always claimed that it didn't know its software would collect the private information Google is facing an inquiry into claims that it deliberately harvested information from millions of UK home computers. The Information Commissioner data protection watchdog is expected to examine the work of the internet giant’s Street View cars. They downloaded emails, text messages, photographs and documents from wi-fi networks as they photographed virtually every British road. MARCH 2009: Street View launches in the UK.

Breakthrough: The World’s First Carbon Nanotube Computer "'m just wondering that, with less and less electricity required to make these "switches" in a carbon-nanotube processor work, how vulnerable does it make them to being accidentally switched by the ambient, static electricity already in the atmosphere, like from thunderstorms or generated by household appliances, etc." That is one of the reasons why you when you open your computer, you ground yourself first before touching circuit boards. I assume these new circuits would be protected and shielded in the same manner as circuits made of silicon are now. And they'd be handled with the same precautions. The same goes for EMPs. The military has long worked on methods to shield silicon chips from EMP and resist and compensate for cosmic ray damage.

CA School District Announces It's Doing Round-The-Clock Monitoring Of Its 13,000 Students' Social Media Activities The Glendale School District in California is facing some backlash from the recent news that it has retained the services of Geo Listening to track its students' social media activity. The rationale behind the program is (of course) the students' safety. After collecting information from students' posts on social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter, Geo Listening will provide Glendale school officials with a daily report that categorizes posts by their frequency and how they relate to cyber-bullying, harm, hate, despair, substance abuse, vandalism and truancy.Glendale Unified, which piloted the service at Hoover, Glendale and Crescenta Valley high schools last year, will pay the company $40,500 to monitor posts made by about 13,000 middle school and high school students at eight Glendale schools. Glendale Unified Supt. Dick Sheehan said the service gives the district another opportunity to "go above and beyond" when dealing with students' safety."

» Judge Napolitano: First Patriot To Shoot Down A Government Spy Drone Will Be A Hero Alex Jones Blasts illegal use of “plastic drones” to spy on Americans in their backyards Steve Watson Infowars.com May 16, 2012 Judge Andrew Napolitano has warned Congress not to act “like potted plants” regarding the increased use of unmanned surveillance drones without warrants over US skies by military, government, and law enforcement agencies. Echoing the recent comments of his Fox News colleague Charles Krauthammer, Napolitano also said that “The first American patriot that shoots down one of these drones that comes too close to his children in his backyard will be an American hero.” The federal government is rolling out new rules on the use of the unmanned drones this week, with the Federal Aviation Administration announcing procedures will “streamline” the process through which government agencies, including local law enforcement, receive licenses to operate the aircraft. Steve Watson is the London based writer and editor for Alex Jones’ Infowars.net, and Prisonplanet.com. Print this page.

Accelerator on a chip: Technology could spawn new generations of smaller, less expensive devices for science, medicine In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice. The achievement was reported today in Nature by a team including scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University. "We still have a number of challenges before this technology becomes practical for real-world use, but eventually it would substantially reduce the size and cost of future high-energy particle colliders for exploring the world of fundamental particles and forces," said Joel England, the SLAC physicist who led the experiments. "It could also help enable compact accelerators and X-ray devices for security scanning, medical therapy and imaging, and research in biology and materials science." Today's accelerators use microwaves to boost the energy of electrons.

Facebook Now Knows What You're Buying at Drug Stores In an attempt to give advertisers more information about the effectiveness of ads, Facebook has partnered with Datalogix, a company that "can track whether people who see ads on the social networking site end up buying those products in stores," as The Financial Times's Emily Steel and April Dembosky explain. Advertisers have complained that Facebook doesn't give them any way to see if ads lead to buying. This new partnership is their response. The service will link up the 70 million households worth of purchasing information that Datalogix has with Facebook profiles so they can see if the ads you see changes the stuff you buy and tell advertisers whether their ads are working. Up until now, the social network has been limited to only tracking your Internet life (on and off Facebook.com) with its ubiquitous "like" buttons, but as promised, the future of Facebook is more focused on data, including tracking our offline habits. But finding the link on Facebook requires a lot of digging.

The New Pay Phone and What It Knows About You The term pay phone has a new meaning today. For consumers who wish to ditch their wallets, paying through a mobile phone can be awfully convenient. Those same consumers can also, often unwittingly, give up valuable information about themselves to merchants that want to sell them things. A new survey by law professors at the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that most Americans are uneasy with the idea that their phones could divulge behavioral and personal information, like phone numbers and in-store browsing habits. The survey was created by Chris Hoofnagle and Jennifer Urban, who study digital privacy issues, and financed by Nokia, which makes cellphones. It found that four out of five of those surveyed “objected to the transfer of their phone number to a store where they purchase goods,” while 15 percent said they would “probably allow” transmission of that information and only 3 percent said they would “definitely allow it.”

HP Memristors Will Reinvent Computer Memory 'by 2014' | Wired Enterprise By the end of 2012, HP may introduce a new breed of electrical building-block: the memristor. Image: Luke Kilpatrick/Flickr HP is two and half years away from offering hardware that stores data with memristors, a new breed of electrical building-block that could lead to servers and other devices that are far more efficient than today’s machines, according to report citing one of the technology’s inventors. As reported by The Register, at a recent conference in Oxnard, California, HP’s Stan Williams said that commercial memristor hardware will be available by the end of 2014 at the earliest. A company spokesman tells us that the company has not officially announced its plan for memristors. But Williams’ remarks indicate that the introduction of the technology has been pushed back. “It’s sad to say, but the science and technology are the easy part,” Williams said at the recent conference. Memristor via electron microscope. “[The memristor] holds its memory longer,” Williams said.

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