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Reading Rants

Reading Rants
April Publishingpalooza 2014 Holy moly, is there anything more difficult than waiting for a new book to come out?! I don’t think so. So for those of you who hate to wait as much as I do, (especially for THIS ONE TO THE RIGHT) here are some good sites for cyber-stalking your favorite up and coming titles. YALit: Young Adult Book Release Dates 2014 YA Fiction Preview from BookRiot

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Blog - Pat Mora Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz was a 17th century nun who devoted her life to writing and learning and words. Though she died in 1695, Sor Juana Inés is still considered one of the most brilliant writers in Mexico’s history: her poetry is recited by schoolchildren throughout Mexico and is studied at schools and universities around the world. Original cover Rainbow Project Book List About the Rainbow Project Book List The Rainbow Project Book List is list of recommended books dealing with gay, lesbian, bisexual, trangendered and questioning issues and situations for children up to age 18. Administered by: YALSA's Book Awards and Booklists *YALSA has launched the new Teen Book Finder Database, which is a one-stop shop for finding selected lists and award winners. Users can search this free resource by award, list name, year, author, genre and more, as well as print customizable lists. This new resource will replace the individual award and list web pages currently on YALSA’s site that are not searchable and that are organized only by year. Looking for great teen books? Look no further than YALSA's Book Awards and Selected Booklists. While these books have been selected for teens from 12 to 18 years of age, the award-winning titles and the titles on YALSA's selected lists span a broad range of reading and maturity levels.

What's Next® in a Book Series Database Our What's Next®: Books in Series database helps you search series fiction. A series is two or more books linked by character(s), settings, or other common traits. e.g. Sue Grafton's "A is for Alibi", "B is for..." etc. or the "Star Wars" series Search for a Book The What's Next®: Books in Series database was developed and is maintained by the Kent District Library. Best Young Adult Books For Grown-Ups In honor of National Support Teen Literature Day, we've collected the best books to pick up if you're in the mood for a little young adult lit. YA has only gotten more popular in the seven years since The Hunger Games came out in 2008. Blockbuster adaptations of stand-alone novels and series like The Fault in Our Stars, The Maze Runner, and Divergent have made YA familiar even to those who haven't picked up a book written for teens since they were a teen themselves. But just because the box office is dominated by dystopian landscapes and John Green doesn't mean that's all YA has to offer. Recent titles destined to become classics represent all sub-genres. There's everything from historical fiction to magical realism and literary fiction.

Book Reviews, Bestselling Books & Publishing Business News Parts of this site are only available to paying PW subscribers. Subscribers: to set up your digital access click here. To subscribe, click here. PW “All Access” site license members have access to PW’s subscriber-only website content. Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) YALSA’s Readers’ Choice list seeks to engage a wide audience of librarians, educators, teens and young adult literature enthusiasts in choosing the most popular teen titles in a given year, as organized by broad genres. The list will also provide librarians with a timely means of identifying popular teen titles on an ongoing basis. Nominations will be posted monthly, with a final vote taking place each November. Any individual, provided he/she is not the author or an employee of the publisher, or a current member of the Readers’ Choice List Committee may nominate a title via an online form, while only YALSA members are eligible to vote for the final ballot, which is sent in the November issue of YALSA E-News. Policies and Procedures

Dewey Decimal Classification System The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) system was conceived to accommodate the expansion and evolution of the body of human knowledge. That's why 23 unabridged print editions and 15 abridged editions over nearly 139 years, as well as multiple Web editions since 2000 have been published—to ensure that you have current tools to manage contemporary knowledge organization projects. The four-volume unabridged edition is published approximately every seven years, reflecting the time the Dewey editorial team needs to implement changes across the entire classification. The 23rd print edition, published in mid-2011, includes many new features that make the classification easier to use.

Read Brightly- Teen (Ages 13+) Search Popular Searches: Printables Audiobooks Graphic Novels Harry Potter Wonder Get book recommendations, tips & advice, and more tailored to your child's age. By submitting my email, I acknowledge that I have read and agree to Penguin Random House's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. Thank You! The perfect book picks are on their way.

Coming of Age Online: Social Media in YA Literature Teens today are coming of age in an environment saturated with social media, so it’s no surprise it’s featured prominently in the plots of many young adult novels. When I started noticing a trend of books that explore the impact that social media has on the lives of teens, I decided it would be interesting to compile a list showcasing the various ways that teens’ use of Facebook, Twitter, blogging, and other social media are depicted in young adult literature. Lauren Myracle’s Internet Girls series is inventive in structure and form, but the story of girls chatting online and communicating in a virtual space is also groundbreaking in the way it examines the social lives of teens.

The ALAN Review The ALAN Review (TAR) is a peer-reviewed (refereed) journal published by the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council of Teachers of English (ALAN). It is devoted solely to the field of literature for young adults. It is published three times per academic year (fall, winter, and summer) and is sent to all ALAN members, individual and institutional. Members of ALAN need not be members of NCTE. Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) Skip to main content Search form a Division of the American Library Association You are at: ALA.org » YALSA » Redirect to booklistsawards/booklistsbook » Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers Share this page: Project Gutenberg - free ebooks online download for iPad, Kindle, Nook, Android, iPhone, iPod Touch, Sony Reader On August 26 2020, the Project Gutenberg website underwent some major changes. These changes had been previewed since early 2020, and visitors to the old site were invited to try the new site, including giving input via a brief survey. The old site is no longer available. If you found yourself on this page unexpectedly, it is because an old page was redirected here. Please use the navigation menus at the top of the page to find what you were looking for. All of the functionality, and most of the content, from the old site is still here - but in a different location.

Read Brightly- Tween (Ages 9, 10, 11, 12) Search Popular Searches: Printables Audiobooks Graphic Novels Harry Potter Wonder Tween (Ages 9, 10, 11, 12) As kids grow older, they need books that resonate with their complex lives — as well as educate and entertain them. Explore the books and topics below to find age-appropriate selections guaranteed to keep your middle grade reader flipping pages. Photo credit: Hero Images / Getty Images

The Reading Rants displays its purpose as an “Out of the Ordinary Booklist.” The blog’s author is a middle school librarian in Manhattan, and she publishes several YA book reviews each month. Many of these reviews include links to more information about the book and/or author. It also includes an extensive list of recommendations organized by genre. • Students can email the blogger to request that she read and a review a book that have read. Then, compare her review to their own. • Students can get ideas for books to read according to their interests. • Students can comment on the bloggers reviews and interact with other blog readers. by cheryllr5 Oct 11

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