background preloader

Chemical & Engineering News: What's That Stuff?

Chemical & Engineering News: What's That Stuff?
You might ask yourself... What's That Stuff? Ever wondered about what's really in hair coloring, Silly Putty, Cheese Wiz, artificial snow, or self-tanners? C&EN presents a collection of articles that gives you a look at the chemistry behind a wide variety of everyday products. Sort: Alphabetically (Text Only) | Most Recent

http://pubs.acs.org/cen/whatstuff/stuff.html

Bear Sleeping Bag Cool bear shaped sleeping bag, designed by Eiko Ishizawa from Amsterdam, will keep you warm and scare your friends when you go camping. Please be warned that, according to the artist, it is not his responsibility if a wild bear attacks you, or some silly hunter hunts you down. For more designs, check out: Unique and Creative Sleeping Bags

How to Trick Your Brain for Happiness This month, we feature videos of a Greater Good presentation by Rick Hanson, the best-selling author and trailblazing psychologist. In this excerpt from his talk, Dr. Hanson explains how we can take advantage of the brain’s natural “plasticity”—it’s ability to change shape over time. gobyg December 15 - On This Day in Chemistry He discovered radioactivity from uranium (U) salts and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903 along with Pierre and Marie Curie. Related Resources NSTA Formative Science Probes Upload Our Class Homepage maxclassonline Bizarre sea slug is half plant, half animal It looks like any other sea slug, aside from its bright green hue. But the Elysia chlorotica is far from ordinary: it is both a plant and an animal, according to biologists who have been studying the species for two decades. Not only does E. chlorotica turn sunlight into energy — something only plants can do — it also appears to have swiped this ability from the algae it consumes. Native to the salt marshes of New England and Canada, these sea slugs use contraband chlorophyll-producing genes and cell parts called chloroplasts from algae to carry out photosynthesis, says Sidney Pierce, a biologist at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

GoFlow: a DIY tDCS brain-boosting kit Did you know that by attaching a 9-volt battery to your scalp — with the help of some electrodes and some wet sponges (or conducting gel) — you can more than double your brain’s learning rate and boost peak performance? It sounds crazy, but it has now been proven by multiple studies that transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) can significantly speed up your brain. In one case, the US Air Force used tDCS on trainee drone pilots to halve their learning time; likewise, DARPA has used tDCS to speed up the training of snipers. In another study, carried out by the University of New Mexico, test subjects learned how to play a video game twice as quickly while under tDCS, and played the game with heightened performance. Furthermore, tDCS has been shown to have therapeutic effects on people with neurological issues, such as Parkinson’s disease or post-stroke motor dysfunction. And best of all, it’s safe!

CEF (Chemical Educational Foundation): You Be The Chemist Welcome to You Be The Chemist! The Chemical Educational Foundation's You Be The Chemist® (YBTC) programs are designed to enhance K-8 science education by introducing the central role of chemistry in all the sciences and in our everyday lives. To accomplish its mission, CEF relies on the collaboration of industry, educators, and all members of a community to enhance science education among every generation, beginning with our youth. CEF's current YBTC programs include: YBTC Essential Elements YBTC Essential Elements is designed to assist K–8 educators—our “essential elements” in education—in teaching chemistry concepts through hands-on learning and connecting those concepts to students’ everyday lives.

index Loading [MathJax]/extensions/MathMenu.js July 10, 2012 July 17, 2012 July 24, 2012 July 31, 2012 August 7, 2012 5 of the Coolest Staircases Ever Anyone wanting or already in the process of redesigning their multi-level home should take a look at these cool staircases, which break away from the standard design and add some creative flair. Continue reading to see them all. [via Toxel] 1. Boost Your Brain’s Power With a 9-Volt Battery and Some Wet Sponges It seems, with the help of a 9-volt battery, wire, crocodile clips, and wet sponges, you can increase your brain’s performance and, more importantly, return your brain to its younger, more malleable and learning-receptive state. The technique, which is lumbered with the fantastic and slightly terrifying name of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), is similar to deep brain stimulation (DBS), but it doesn’t involve complex neurosurgery. TCDS runs a very small current — just 2 milliamps — into brain tissue just beneath your scalp; it’s non-invasive, and seemingly quite safe.

Chemistry For All The "Chemistry for All" resources are not aligned to our new Michigan Science Standards. They are archived here to support the building of aligned storylines with associated phenomenon. A sample chemistry course, aligned to the new standards, is currently being built. All the units and lesson plans will be house on Wayne RESA's Atlas Rubicon site.

Science Xplained Science Xplained is a collection of video podcasts that tell the stories of the science behind everyday topics. Dr. Ainissa G. Ramirez, self-proclaimed science evangelist and associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Yale University, is the dynamic host of the series. The Greatest List of The Coolest Ice Cubes around Some of my favorite things are so simple, like ice cube shapes for example. Here’s a list of some of my favorite Ice Cube Trays and related inventions, not including the previously featured Global Warming Ice Cubes! If you like stuff like this join us on facebook or follow us on twitter to find more cool things and automatically enter to win awesome stuff on One More Gadget. 1. The recipe for success: get happy and you will get ahead in life Happiness, rather than working hard, is the key to success, according to research published today. Cheerful people are more likely to try new things and challenge themselves, which reinforces positive emotion and leads to success in work, good relationships and strong health, say psychologists. The findings suggest that happiness is not a "feelgood" luxury, but is essential to people's wellbeing. What is more, happiness can also extend across an entire nation, with people in "happy" nations being more likely to have pro-democratic attitudes and a keenness to help others. The link between happiness and success was investigated by a team from the University of California Riverside, led by Professor Sonja Lyubomirsky. First, they analysed questionnaires that ask people about multiple aspects of their lives.

Related: