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CARTO magazine

CARTO magazine

http://www.carto-presse.com/

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la Terre à plat <br /><table class="warning" summary=""><tr><td><h2 class="warning">JavaScript Is Not Available</h2><table summary=""><tr><td><img src="../../StockImg/warning36.png" alt=""></td><td>&nbsp;</td><td><em>Since JavaScript is disabled or not supported in your browser, some or all maps in this page will not be displayed.</em></td></tr></table></td></tr></table><br /> Cubic Globes Although mapping into the regular hexahedron (an ordinary cube) is prone to pronounced distortion, the nonsensical notion of "Earth-in-a-box" has long fascinated me. Once I plotted and folded such a map by hand alone, using an arbitrary compound of cylindrical and Collignon-like projections.

HARVARD Collection Digital Maps The Harvard Map Collection is one of the oldest and largest collections of cartographic materials in the United States with over 500,000 items. Resources range from 16th century globes to modern maps and geographic information systems (GIS) layers. A selection of our materials has been digitally imaged and is offered both as true picture images and georeferenced copies. This Virtual Collection includes those maps and atlases that are available through the Harvard Image Delivery Service. Those maps that have been georeferenced are available through the Harvard Geospatial Library. Therefore, many of the maps listed will have two records, one for the image that is true to the original and the other a georeferenced image.

40 more maps that explain the world Maps seemed to be everywhere in 2013, a trend I like to think we encouraged along with August's 40 maps that explain the world. Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. You might consider this, then, a collection of maps meant to inspire your inner map nerd. I've searched far and wide for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not, with a careful eye for sourcing and detail. I've included a link for more information on just about every one. Enjoy.

40 maps that explain the world Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable. A majority are original to this blog, with others from a variety of sources. GISS: G.Projector — Global Map Projector G.Projector transforms an equirectangular map image into any of over 125 global and regional map projections. Longitude-latitude gridlines and continental outlines may be drawn on the map, and the resulting image may be saved to disk in GIF, JPEG, PDF, PNG, PS or TIFF form. G.Projector is a cross-platform application that runs on Macintosh, Windows, Linux and other desktop computers.

Wind Map An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future. This map shows you the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US. The wind map is a personal art project, not associated with any company. We've done our best to make this as accurate as possible, but can't make any guarantees about the correctness of the data or our software. Please do not use the map or its data to fly a plane, sail a boat, or fight wildfires :-) If the map is missing or seems slow, we recommend the latest Chrome browser.

The National Map The National Map is now offering a collection of small-scale datasets that can be downloaded for free. Although the 1997-2014 Edition of the National Atlas of the United States was retired in September 2014, The National Map recognizes the importance of continuing to make a collection of the small-scale datasets, originally developed for the National Atlas, available to users. Small-scale maps have an advantage over large-scale maps when there is a need to show a large area in a single view. This makes small-scale maps an ideal solution for scientists, decision-makers, and planners needing to provide a geographical context for the research projects.

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean William Parker spent the majority of his pirating days attacking Spanish treasure fleets and ports throughout modern Central America. Parker was a privateer, with the backing of England, who sailed with Francis Drake before getting his own ship. After nearly a decade in the Caribbean, Parker eventually returned home to England after 1601. François l'Olonnais was a French pirate that preyed on the Spanish treasure fleets between 1660 and 1668. Our Aging World: Wave Goodbye To The Population Pyramid — Longevity Reporter Why does this matter? The US alone already has 40 million people over 60 - more than the entire population of California. These numbers are straining resources worldwide and will affect nearly every aspect of society.

OpenStreetMap Where am I? Welcome to OpenStreetMap! OpenStreetMap is a map of the world, created by people like you and free to use under an open license. Hosting is supported by the UCL VR Centre, Bytemark Hosting and Imperial College London, and other partners. Learn More Start Mapping <div id="noscript"><p>You are either using a browser that does not support JavaScript, or you have disabled JavaScript.

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