background preloader

School Libraries and Makerspaces: Can They Coexist?

School Libraries and Makerspaces: Can They Coexist?
More and more schools are coming to value maker education and exploring ways to create makerspaces in their schools. Many schools are discussing how they might utilize their library to facilitate this. As my school has increased our commitment to constructionist learning and maker education over the last few years, we have done so in close collaboration with our school library. In exploring the relationship between the school library and school makerspace, it's not difficult to see why conversations about the growth of makerspaces are often tied to the conversation about the future of libraries. Both makerspaces and libraries are constructivist learning spaces that share a number of common goals, while approaching them in different ways and through very different material resources. Similar Yet Distinct Makerspaces and libraries are sites of informal learning. Libraries and makerspaces are inherently interdisciplinary spaces. Makerspaces and libraries are more than just resource closets.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/school-libraries-makerspaces-coexist-josh-weisgrau

Related:  Future of librariesMakerspace informationSchool Libraries make a differenceMakerspacesArticles on Makerspaces

We Need Libraries As Much As Maker Spaces – John Spencer A few weeks ago, I was at a conference when a conversation broke out about rethinking spaces in school. “What if we transformed libraries into maker spaces?” a teacher asked. “Exactly. A Thematic Approach to Planning Your Maker Space When schools talk about the Maker Movement and creating maker spaces, they often focus their initial thinking on purchasing the tools and materials. This resource-driven approach can create a buzz in your school for some time; however, that excitement will inevitably fade. While resources are an important part of any maker space, taking a thematic planning approach is much more effective.

Online referencing generator Access to information has never been easier for students as traditional print resources are supplemented with information from a plethora of World Wide Web sources. However, the ease of information access has developed a 'cut-and-paste' mentality to research, resulting in a rise in plagiarism among the student population. In order to minimise this problem, students need to be aware of the importance of acknowledging sources and, in particular, the conventions of referencing.

A Librarian's Guide to Makerspaces: 16 Resources Makerspaces, sometimes also referred to as hackerspaces, hackspaces, and fablabs are creative, DIY spaces where people can gather to create, invent, and learn. In libraries they often have 3D printers, software, electronics, craft and hardware supplies and tools, and more. Here are some excellent resources for anyone thinking about setting up a makerspace in their organization. Articles & Blog Posts Libraries, Hackspaces and E-waste: how libraries can be the hub of a young maker revolution “…there’s another gang of information-literate people out there, a gang who are a natural ally of libraries and librarians: the maker movement.

How to Turn Your School Into a Maker Haven One of the best ways for frustrated parents, students and teachers to convince school leaders that it’s time for a reboot is with amazing student work. An unconventional learning community of “makers” — people who like to figure out and fix problems with their hands — stands ready to demonstrate a hands-on learning style in which students engage problems that matter to them, taking agency and displaying creativity along the way. The Maker Movement is slowly infiltrating schools across the country with the help of dedicated educators and inspirational students proving with their creations that they can do incredible things when given a chance. “People are seeing through the eyes and the hands and the screens of children what’s possible, and it’s re-energizing progressive views of education,” said Gary Stager, co-author with Sylvia Libow Martinez of “Invent to Learn,” a book about the Maker Movement. “School is a big system,” Martinez said. “When you push it one way, it pushes back.”

School Libraries of the Future: 5 Trends to Watch By Pat Hadler School libraries were once somber places where books were warehoused and librarians kept things in order – and quiet. With the digital revolution ongoing, school libraries are transforming into very different places. Often they are noisy, with classes of children searching for new books for sustained silent reading or collecting information for book reports and projects. A Librarian’s Guide to OER in the Maker Space Dynamic, living, breathing, current, personalized, adaptive, engaging, creative, cutting-edge, and current are just some of the words that have been used to describe the open educational resources (OER) movement. The U.S. Department of Education recently expanded its efforts to increase schools’ access to high-quality, openly licensed learning resources, giving educators more access to technology to personalize learning for their students. What are OER? OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits sharing, accessing, repurposing—including for commercial purposes—and collaborating with others. They include educational materials, such as lesson plans, games, textbooks, tests, audio, and video.

Thing 31: Evidence Based Practice – Getting Started If school librarians can’t prove they make a difference, they may cease to exist.(Ross Todd – The Evidence-Based Manifesto for School Librarians SLJ, 2008) This first lesson in our latest Cool Tools track was inspired by conversations that started at a recent workshop by Jennifer LaGarde on annual reports and collecting data. And by the work of Ross Todd, Lyn Hay and Joyce Valenza (among many others!) on Evidence Based Practice. Some of you asked us to put together lessons that would give you time and resources to think about using Evidence Based Practice (EBP) to help improve your library’s program and help you show how you and your library’s services help students succeed.

School Librarians Push for More 'Maker Spaces' Published Online: May 12, 2015 Published in Print: May 13, 2015, as School Librarians Push To Create 'Maker Spaces' Sarah Cramer, a librarian in training, consults with Jay Wambere, a 5th grade student, about his LittleBits electronic music composition at Mitchell Elementary School in Ann Arbor, Mich. The schools i participating in the Michigan Makers program, a University of Michigan initiative that supports the use of maker spaces in schools. —Daryl Marshke/University of Michigan School of Information Movement fuels project-based learning

Maker's Imagination The Beauty of Homemade Fun By Kristina Holzweiss, School Library Journal Librarian of the Year, 2015 In my next life I will come back as an archaeologist, a female Indiana Jones on the quest for the lost relic of an ancient civilization. For now, I am on the hunt for recyclable materials that my students can transform into works of art and engineering in our library makerspace. My own three young children (Tyler, 7; Riley, 5; and Lexy, 3) always know to ask Mommy before they toss anything into the trash. Soda cans, water bottles, cardboard, and packing materials are all resources that have the potential to become jewelry, flowers, cars, and forts. Some see trash, but I see treasure!

How Libraries Fit in the Future of Learning Back when I was in school, libraries were all about books — books, books and more books. During my frequent visits to the library, I would pore through encyclopedias and fill out countless checkout cards before heading home with a backpack full of reading material. Of course, teachers also scheduled regular media time so students could use the library’s computer pod, but technology wasn’t nearly as integral to the library experience as it is today. The advent of the digital age had a profound impact on school libraries.

Starting a School Makerspace from Scratch With the National Week of Making behind us, you might be ready to start a makerspace in your school -- but not know where to start. Will purchasing a costly 3D printer and the latest robotics kit ensure learning and maker success? What are some steps to starting a successful makerspace from scratch? Step 1: Immerse Yourself in Maker Education Before you can build your own community of makers, you need to join one! Immerse yourself in makerspaces by joining a summer maker camp like Exploratorium's Tinkering Fundamentals or the virtual Camp Google for cheap and easy STEM ideas, but most importantly: make stuff!

ACRL Report Shows Compelling Evidence of Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success A new report issued by ACRL, “Documented Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success: Building Evidence with Team-Based Assessment in Action Campus Projects,” shows compelling evidence for library contributions to student learning and success. The report focuses on dozens of projects conducted as part of the program Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success (AiA) by teams that participated in the second year of the program, from April 2014 to June 2015. Synthesizing more than 60 individual project reports (fully searchable online) and using past findings from projects completed during the first year of the AiA program as context, the report identifies strong evidence of the positive contributions of academic libraries to student learning and success in four key areas: Students benefit from library instruction in their initial coursework.

Showing my students how to add comments by margieteacheslibstudies Oct 21

Related: