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El castillo de Drácula

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The Lost Drawings Of An Artist Who Spent His Life In A Lunatic Asylum James Edward Deeds Jr. was destined to be a completely unknown artist. Declared insane in 1936 at the age of 28, Deeds spent his life in a Missouri mental hospital known as State Lunatic Asylum No. 3, where he drew prolifically. When he died, his art ended up in a family member’s attic, forgotten. Eventually, movers threw it out with the garbage in the 1970s. Simple yet genius idea to turn plastic bottles into strong plastic wire Russian Youtuber, Адвокат Егоров, has demonstrated a simple yet genius idea of turning plastic bottles into a strong usable wire in such a simple way. Almost in the same action as a cheese grater, the blade cuts the bottle at one edge and then it is turned until you are left with a long spool of plastic rope. Адвокат Егоров/Youtube Unfortunately, if you don’t understand Russian you won’t have much of an idea of what he is saying, but the process is simple enough to understand from watching and it is somewhat satisfying to watch. You see him pulling the rope the length of his garden until the bottle is finished.

Music and comics clash together on DANTE’s new single: ‘Sleipnir’ 03 Mar 2016 DANTE is releasing their single ‘Sleipnir’ via their social media, last in the saga of their second album Gunblade Blues I, with a comicbook available for free reading via their official website. The song ‘Sleipnir’ was born out of interest of mixing the western influences of the band – Ennio Morriconne for instance- and their taste for songs of an epic nature, which created the perfect mood and length to put together the overall themes that the album speaks of within the lyrics of a great song that compiles, and in a way binds the album together in a single entity. The band didn’t want to repeat the same formula with a high quality video and from there, the idea of transforming it to comic book form was born. This combination allowed a passion for music and this type of story telling to come together and by doing so, also made way to releasing the piece through an exploration of different media outlets.

Tiny sea snail 'swims like a bee' A tiny species of sea snail "flies" underwater using movements just like winged insects, according to a study. US scientists observed the so-called sea butterfly - actually an aquatic snail - using high-speed video and flow-tracking systems. The 3mm critter flaps its wing structures, which grow where a snail's foot would normally be, in a characteristic figure-of-eight pattern. It also uses some of the vortex-making tricks that keep insects in the air. Reverse Engineering Mysterious 500-Million-Year-Old Fossils That Confound Our Tree of Life The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation, an online publication covering the latest research. Paleontologists like us are used to working with fossils that would seem bizarre to many biologists accustomed to living creatures. And as we go farther back in Earth’s history, the fossils start to look even weirder. They lack tails, legs, skeletons, eyes…any characteristics that would help us understand where these organisms fit in the tree of life.

THE TEMPLE OCULUS ANUBIS KEEPS OREGON MYTH-MAKERS REELING — ESOTERICANA Many commenters on past articles relating to the location often reassure readers that this is a legitimate company, run by the youngest son of the Neal Family, an optometrist (hence the word "OCULUS"). But what most commenters don't seem to account for is that the company's website on the business' general info is listed as heavensgate.com . Why the connection? Perhaps some local kids thought to crank up the urban legends with this addition to their information? Please comment if you can shed light on this disturbing facet.

This man built a floating solar-powered fortress made out of 150,000 recycled water bottles Off the cost of Isla Mujeres Bay in Cancun, Mexico, environmentalist and architect Richart Sowa lives comfortably on his island made of over 150,000 recycled water bottles. Sowa first built his floating abode in 2005, but harsh weather destroyed the island. On his third attempt of rebuilding his home— this time in calm waters—he succeeded in developing a sturdy home. He has been living almost completely self-sustainably on his private island since 2008. “Living on my own floating island has been my dream for over two-decades,” said Sowa in Daily Mail, unfazed by his previous attempts. ‘Cocaine In My Brain’: The greatest cocaine anthem of the ‘70s is NOT by Eric Clapton ‘Cocaine In My Brain’: The greatest cocaine anthem of the ‘70s is NOT by Eric Clapton There exists a rich musical history of recorded songs about cocaine use dating at least as far back as Victoria Spivey and Lonnie Johnson’s 1927 “Dopehead Blues,” or Dick Justice’s 1928 “Cocaine.” On one end of the spectrum are commendably classic tunes about nose-candy such as Johnny Cash’s “Cocaine Blues,” J.J.

Australia: Tasmanian tiger 'sighting' proves it is not extinct A Tasmanian tiger hunter has said he believes the carnivorous marsupial isn't extinct after all - it's actually roaming across mainland Australia. World-renowned thylacine hunter Michael Moss has spent 20 years searching for the elusive wildcat across the country, and says dashboard cameras are the key to proving his theory. "There has already been a claimed sighting of one in Fisheries Rd, Devon Meadows, a few years ago," Moss told the Cranbourne Leader. "And I've got footage of what I believe is one crossing a paddock in the Strezlecki Ranges, near Wilsons Promontory. "Most reports to date have been of animals near or crossing roads ... with the advent of dashboard cameras in cars, I think we will see some concrete evidence before much longer." The dog-like animal has officially been extinct since 1986, though footage Moss captured of a similar creature 15 years ago reignited debate.

Exploring the Mysterious Life of One of Earth's First Giant Organisms Paleontologists unearthed a strange sight in Newfoundland in the early 2000s: an ancient fossil bed of frond-shaped organisms, some 571 million years old and up to two meters long. Researchers had discovered these mysterious extinct creatures—called rangeomorphs—before, but they still do not know exactly what they are. “For 50 years the rangeomorphs have continued to confuse scientists as we try to understand how they lived and where they might have fitted in the ‘tree of life,’” explains Jack Matthews, a geology research fellow at Memorial University of Newfoundland and the University of Oxford. Some believe they may be primitive animals, but there is no consensus. Nevertheless, scientists believe these bizarre-looking beings could help answer key questions about life on Earth, because they are “the oldest evidence we have for large, architecturally complex, multicellular life,” Matthews wrote in an e-mail to Scientific American.

Japan's epic samurai dramas are in a tight spot Japanese can roughly be split into two camps: those equipped with an encyclopedic knowledge of history and those who have only a vague idea of who the samurai were or that a Shogun once lived in what is now the Imperial Palace. The history geeks on one side and those who couldn’t care less on the other. Back in the 20th century, Japanese jidaigeki (samurai period dramas) targeted the former, particularly those middle-aged and older individuals still steeped in the traditions and values of a bygone and terribly insular era.

Maasai women lead a solar revolution Not long ago, dusk was a time of unease for the people of Magadi, a village in Kenya’s Kajiado County. As the sun set, farmers began worrying about their cattle, easy prey for hyenas and leopards. Children lit fires to finish their schoolwork, filling homes with smoke. Now as darkness falls, lights flick on across this sleepy hamlet, thanks to the efforts of more than 200 Maasai women at the frontline of a solar power revolution.

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