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Developing a growth mindset in the classroom There’s a free info graphic version of this article. To download it, click here. As a kid I wanted to become a cliché when I grew up so I bought a guitar and grew my hair. I successfully learnt all the chords but struggled to combine them in a meaningful way (perhaps I should’ve joined an experimental jazz band instead of churning out 1980s power ballads).

12 Useful Math Hacks That They Didn’t Teach You In School 6. How To Figure Out What Day Of The Week Falls On What Date… You might be confused looking at the picture below, but the math is actually quite simple (albeit a bit elaborate). You’ll need the codes HERE, which will help you master this.

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives “If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library) — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives. One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality.

Self-Assessment Questions for a Growth Mindset We recently came across this infographic by Jackie Gerstein, Ed.D. that beautifully sums up the process of self-assessment and the 21st Century Fluencies. In a word, it’s all about evaluation. It couples so well with great formative self-assessment tools that we wanted to highlight it here and expand a little on each point. As we consider each question, obviously the best answer is “Yes.” But if it’s “No,” we want to understand why. Using Genial.ly to Create Visual Activities for the Classroom Here I am again. Trying another tool. To be honest, the tool was suggested to me by one of the teachers (Marga Valdés) attending a talk I gave last year. It was a talk about creating activities for the classroom using free online tools, and when I finished the presentation, this teacher came up to me and said she was surprised I hadn’t mentioned Genial.ly. I confessed to her I didn’t know the tool and promised I would give it a go. It was almost the end of the course and although I gave it a quick try, my mind was in holiday mode, and I didn’t put my heart into it.

Top Ten Tips for developing a Growth Mindset in your Classroom Be Critical. Students should expect and welcome criticism. They must also be given the opportunity to act on any criticism or critique. This will allow students to realise that through improving their work and responding to feedback, they can be better than they were. For this to happen, the culture of improvement needs to feel completely normal. As teachers, we also need to think about how and when we give feedback. YouTube Create beautiful movies on the go Capture the momentStitch together an unlimited number of clips as you build your story. Start recording in a snap Record as many clips as you’d like Edit on the goEasily trim and rearrange clips right from your phone, and add a soundtrack from your music collection or Capture’s audio library. Edit your video on the go Enhance your video by adding a soundtrack Share your movieQuickly upload your video to YouTube and in one step, simultaneously post to all of your social networks.

What Believing in the Possibilities Can Do For Learning and Teaching By Thom Markham In medicine, the placebo effect is well known, but still mysterious. Through some unknown connection between mind and body, placebos produce changes in brain states, immune systems, blood pressure and hormone levels. Although most of us think of a placebo as a sugar pill, in fact it’s any intervention in which beliefs produce measurable changes in physiology, and thus performance. Here’s a typical example: When adults enter a flight simulator and take on the role of Air Force pilots flying a plane, their eyesight improves 40 percent more than adults who just “pretend” to fly a plane in a broken simulator.

Beyond Working Hard: What Growth Mindset Teaches Us About Our Brains Growth mindset has become a pervasive theme in education discussions in part because of convincing research by Stanford professor Carol Dweck and others that relatively low-impact interventions on how a student thinks about himself as a learner can have big impacts on learning. The growth mindset research is part of a growing understanding and acknowledgement that many non-cognitive factors are important to academic learning. While it’s a positive sign that educators see value in the growth mindset research and believe they can implement it in their classrooms, the deceptively simple idea has led to some confusion and misperceptions about what a growth mindset really is and how teachers can support it in the classroom. It’s easy to lump growth mindset in with other education catchphrases, like “resiliency” or “having high expectations,” but growth mindset actually has a much more concrete definition. Approaching the world with a growth mindset can be very liberating.

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