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Marc Prensky

Marc Prensky
“Inspiring” … “Thought Provoking” … “Buzz-Creating” Visionary, yet Practical Perspectiveson Education for Today and Tomorrow from Marc Prensky: Education Keynote Speaker + Author Interview with Marc: Marc’s Most Recent Thinking (2014) (click image) An internationally acclaimed speaker, author, and innovator in the field of education, Marc Prensky offers deep experience and insight into updating our education for today’s world, and into using technology in powerful ways to educate today’s youth.

http://marcprensky.com/

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CITE Journal Article Volume 1, Issue 1 ISSN 1528-5804 Print Version Commentaries Submit A Commentary Carroll, T. G. (2000). If we didn't have the schools we have today, would we create the schools we have today? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education [Online serial], 1 (1). Self- and Peer-Assessment Advantages of self and peer assessment[edit] Logistics[edit] Employing self or peer assessment allows teachers to manage their time more effectively while having students grade each other’s papers results in a more efficient classroom setting.[3] Saves teachers' time[edit] Student grade assignments can save teacher’s time[4] because an entire classroom can be graded together in the time that it would take a teacher to grade one paper. Moreover, rather than having a teacher rush through each paper, students are able to take their time to correct them.

Where is M13? - Home Where is M13? — A Three Dimensional Galactic Atlas! We all have our favorite deep sky objects that we've looked at hundreds and hundreds of times. We know where to find them in the night sky, but most of us have little idea where they lie in the three-dimensional space around our Galaxy. Isn't that just a bit strange? Where is M13?

www.powtoon.com/dashboard/ Enter your email address below, and we'll send you an email allowing you to reset it. Forgot your password? We have sent you an email. If you do not receive it within a few minutes, please try again or contact us at support@powtoon.com. The Ultimate Guide To Using iPads In The Classroom How Students Benefit From Using Social Media 14.60K Views 0 Likes A lot of criticism has been leveled at social media and the effect it has on the way students process and retain information, as well as how distracting it can be. However, social media offers plenty of opportunities for learning and interactivity, and if you take a moment to think about it, it's not too hard to see how students benefit from using social media. 100 Web 2.0 Tools Every Teacher Should Know About

Gifted education Gifted education (also known as Gifted and Talented Education (GATE), Talented and Gifted (TAG), or G/T) is a broad term for special practices, procedures, and theories used in the education of children who have been identified as gifted or talented. There is no standard global definition of what a gifted student is. In 2011, the National Association for Gifted Children published a position paper that defined what a gifted student is. The term "gifted," in that position paper, describes individuals who demonstrate outstanding aptitude or competence in one or more domains. Electromagnetic Spectrum - Introduction The electromagnetic (EM) spectrum is the range of all types of EM radiation. Radiation is energy that travels and spreads out as it goes – the visible light that comes from a lamp in your house and the radio waves that come from a radio station are two types of electromagnetic radiation. The other types of EM radiation that make up the electromagnetic spectrum are microwaves, infrared light, ultraviolet light, X-rays and gamma-rays. You know more about the electromagnetic spectrum than you may think. The image below shows where you might encounter each portion of the EM spectrum in your day-to-day life.

111 EdTech Resources You May Have Missed–Treasure Chest July 3, 2011 It has been a HUGE week in EdTech this week with ISTE 2011, Google+, Microsoft 365 and the rumor of Facebook’s big announcement next week (can someone say videochat). I’m writing this introduction before I start wading through everything I’ve collected this past week. Not everything I think is important when I collect it makes it into the final list. However, even before I start the list, something tells me that this may be my biggest Treasure Chest ever. So, welcome to this week’s edition of Treasure Chest—111 (Yes-111!!!) EdTech Resources You May Have Missed.

Special Education Special education programs in the United States were made mandatory in 1975 when the United States Congress passed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EHA) in response to discriminatory treatment by public educational agencies against students with disabilities. The EHA was later modified to strengthen protections to people with disabilities and renamed the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The federal laws require states to provide special education consistent with federal standards as a condition of receiving federal funds. IDEA entitles every student to a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE). Implementation through cooperative federalism[edit]

The Votes Are In: Edutopia’s Tech Integration Lesson Contest WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation Facebook Edutopia on Facebook Twitter Edutopia on Twitter Differentiated instruction Differentiated instruction and assessment (also known as differentiated learning or, in education, simply, differentiation) is a framework or philosophy for effective teaching that involves providing different students with different avenues to learning (often in the same classroom) in terms of: acquiring content; processing, constructing, or making sense of ideas; and developing teaching materials and assessment measures so that all students within a classroom can learn effectively, regardless of differences in ability.[1] Students vary in culture, socioeconomic status, language, gender, motivation, ability/disability, personal interests and more, and teachers need to be aware of these varieties as they are planning their curriculum. Brain-Based Learning[edit] Differentiation finds its roots and is supported in the literature and research about the brain. As Wolfe (2001) argues, information is acquired through the five senses: sight, smell, taste, touch and sound. Pre-assessment[edit]

Beyond Working Hard: What Growth Mindset Teaches Us About Our Brains Growth mindset has become a pervasive theme in education discussions in part because of convincing research by Stanford professor Carol Dweck and others that relatively low-impact interventions on how a student thinks about himself as a learner can have big impacts on learning. The growth mindset research is part of a growing understanding and acknowledgement that many non-cognitive factors are important to academic learning. While it’s a positive sign that educators see value in the growth mindset research and believe they can implement it in their classrooms, the deceptively simple idea has led to some confusion and misperceptions about what a growth mindset really is and how teachers can support it in the classroom. It’s easy to lump growth mindset in with other education catchphrases, like “resiliency” or “having high expectations,” but growth mindset actually has a much more concrete definition. Approaching the world with a growth mindset can be very liberating. Katrina Schwartz

Helicopter Parent A helicopter parent (also called a cosseting parent or simply a cosseter) is a parent who pays extremely close attention to a child's or children's experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions. Helicopter parents are so named because, like helicopters, they hover overhead. Origins[edit] The term "helicopter parents" is a pejorative expression for parents that has been widely used in the media. The metaphor appeared as early as 1969 in the bestselling book Between Parent & Teenager by Dr. Haim Ginott, which mentions a teen who complains: "Mother hovers over me like a helicopter

PowerPoint Jeopardy Templates Downloads, Educational PowerPoint Information Why should I use PowerPoint in my Classroom Today's students need a diversity of experiences in the classroom. PowerPoint activities used in moderation can help provide that diversity. When teachers first started using PowerPoint in the classroom, some of them went overboard and used PowerPoint as part of every lecture or every activity on a daily basis. Using classroom PowerPoints in this way can lead to student boredom. Teachers need to look at PowerPoint as more than digital "lecture notes" and instead look at new ways they can use this classroom technology to enhance student learning.

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