background preloader

Civil Rights for Kids: African-American Civil Rights Movement

Civil Rights for Kids: African-American Civil Rights Movement
History >> Civil Rights for Kids March on Washington Aug 28, 1963from the United States Information Agency The African-American Civil Rights Movement was an ongoing fight for racial equality that took place for over 100 years after the Civil War. Leaders such as Martin Luther King, Jr., Booker T. Washington, and Rosa Parks paved the way for non-violent protests which led to changes in the law. When most people talk about the "Civil Rights Movement" they are talking about the protests in the 1950s and 1960s that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Background The Civil Rights Movement has its background in the abolitionist movement before the Civil War. Segregation and the Jim Crow Laws Jim Crow Drinking Fountain by John Vachon After the Civil War, many southern states continued to treat African-Americans as second class citizens. Early Protests In the early 1900s, black people began to protest the Jim Crow laws that southern states were implementing to enforce segregation. The Movement Grows

http://www.ducksters.com/history/civil_rights/african-american_civil_rights_movement.php

Related:  MYTHS AND HEROESCivil rights/RacismBlack Americans

Civil Rights Act of 1964 History >> Civil Rights for Kids The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was one of the most important civil rights laws in the history of the United States. It outlawed discrimination, ended racial segregation, and protected the voting rights of minorities and women. President Lyndon Johnson signing the law Background The Declaration of Independence declared that "All men are created equal." However, when the country was first formed this quote didn't apply to everyone, only to wealthy white landowners. The Fight for Civil Rights: 15 Images From America's Past Wednesday marks 50 years since the enactment of the Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964. The landmark piece of legislation outlawed discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, and ended segregation in public services in the United States. The bill followed decades of bloody struggle by civil rights lawyers, activists and ordinary people to gain racial equality for African-Americans, in the face of determined opposition from white supremacists. During that time, the battle moved from the court to the streets as Martin Luther King Jr. spearheaded a strategy of nonviolent resistance with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). The group organized peaceful protests in the deep South with the expectation that opponents would attack protestors, causing bad media coverage and public outrage.

The 1950-60's Black Civil Rights Movement in America The actions of the 1900's black civil rights movement, and a brief outline of the events that occurred. America is advertised as the world's greatest democracy, the land of freedom and equality. However, as little as 40 years ago this slogan was far from the truth. African-Americans were discriminated against constantly, tortured and killed for no other reason than their skin color. Segregation Now: The Resegregation of America’s Schools White students once accounted for a majority of the Tuscaloosa school district's students. But by the mid-1990s, they made up less than a third. Total enrollment had dropped from 13,500 in 1969 to 10,300 in 1995. Many white parents had decided to send their children to nearly all-white private schools or to move across the city line to access the heavily white Tuscaloosa County Schools. Tuscaloosa's business leaders and elected officials had witnessed the transformation of other southern cities after their school districts had reached a tipping point—the point at which white parents become unsettled by the rising share of black students in a school, and pull their children from the school en masse.

Heroes: What They Do & Why We Need Them By Scott T. Allison and George R. Goethals In Part 1 of this series, we introduced the concept of the Heroic Leadership Dynamic, which we define as a system of psychological forces that can explain how humans are drawn to hero stories, how they benefit from these stories, and how the stories help people become heroes themselves.

The KKK and racial problems The Ku Klux Klan was basically based in the south of America. Here they targeted those set free after the American Civil War - the African Americans. The KKK had never considered the former slaves as being free and terrorised Africa American families based in the South. America experienced great economic prosperity during the 1920's but not much of it filtered to the South. Racism mixed with anger at their economic plight formed a potent cocktail. Many different groups had emigrated to America over the years.

segregation « Aisha Thalia One day I was standing in front of a group of black children and was curious to find out how much they knew about their history (I will use the term black because not all of them are African American, some were of Caribbean heritage.) I asked them how many of them knew that blacks had been slaves in this country and in the West Indies. Eighteen sets of wide, curious brown eyes stared back at me, confusion misting over their small faces. Two students confidently raised their hands while the rest glanced around in shame for not knowing. At this point they must have felt my disappointment. I wasn’t disappointed in them, however I was disappointed in the school systems, disappointed in myself for not discovering this fact earlier and even more disappointed in their parents.

Harriet Tubman Wins Poll for Woman on $20 Bill Petitions to replace Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman were delivered to the White House Harriet Tubman won an online poll asking which woman should be featured on the $20 bill, as part of a movement to push President Obama to support the idea. More than 600,000 people voted in the online poll, and Tubman won with over 33% of the vote, beating runner-up Eleanor Roosevelt by 7,000 votes. APARTHEID - ARTICLES, VIDEOS, PICTURES & FACTS My TV provider is not listed. Why not? We are currently working on adding more TV providers. Please check back frequently to see if your TV provider has been added. Why do I need to log in to watch some video content?

Martin Luther King Jr. Biography Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist, who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968. Synopsis Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. King, a Baptist minister and civil-rights activist, had a seismic impact on race relations in the United States, beginning in the mid-1950s. Among his many efforts, King headed the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. MLK's Selma march captured by Stephen Somerstein's lens 18 January 2015Last updated at 19:18 ET Student newspaper editor Stephen Somerstein travelled to Alabama to see Martin Luther King, Jr Some of the most memorable news imagery of the post-war years came from the struggle for black equality, when photojournalism doubled as iconography.

Ku Klux Klan - Facts & Summary In 1915, white Protestant nativists organized a revival of the Ku Klux Klan near Atlanta, Georgia, inspired by their romantic view of the Old South as well as Thomas Dixon’s 1905 book “The Clansman” and D.W. Griffith’s 1915 film “Birth of a Nation.” This second generation of the Klan was not only anti-black but also took a stand against Roman Catholics, Jews, foreigners and organized labor. It was fueled by growing hostility to the surge in immigration that America experienced in the early 20th century along with fears of communist revolution akin to the Bolshevik triumph in Russia in 1917. The organization took as its symbol a burning cross and held rallies, parades and marches around the country.

Nelson Mandela ESL Lesson Plan And Challenge In honor of Nelson Mandela, we want the world to share this lesson plan. The ESL-Library team has put together a new lesson plan in honor of NELSON MANDELA. Our Nelson Mandela lesson plan is FREE for any teacher to use. Discrimination based on Race 2. Exploring Institutional Racism: The case of apartheid and the Holocaust (60- 90 minutes per case study) Note: This activity requires two handouts for each case study. Each case study includes an Introduction and Timeline. Before class, print and make one copy of the appropriate introduction(s) and timeline(s) for each student. Cut the Timeline(s) you are using as instructed on the handout. Directions for using Apartheid handouts

Related: