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Hurricane Matthew has brought the weather deniers out of hiding. While methane from fracking and other fossil-fuel activity hasn’t increased over the last 10 years, agriculture, landfills, and wetlands are getting gassier, according to a new study in Nature.

Hurricane Matthew has brought the weather deniers out of hiding.

From 2007 to 2013, methane emissions rose by about 28 million tons a year. No one knew why. October hurricanes aren’t supposed to be this scary. It all has to do with “molecular machines” — teeny devices made out of individual atoms — that mark the start of a wave of nano-innovation that could drastically change, well, a LOT.

October hurricanes aren’t supposed to be this scary.

Atlantic Hurricane Season is Seeing More Major Storms. By Andrea Thompson and Brian Kahn While the U.S. has been in a major hurricane drought since 2005, those top level storms have actually become more common in the Atlantic basin.

Atlantic Hurricane Season is Seeing More Major Storms

The reason could be linked to rising sea surface temperatures — fueled in part by global warming — as seen in ocean buoy data collected along the U.S. coast. Les catastrophes climatiques ont fait plus de 600 000 morts en vingt ans selon l’ONU. Was there a link between climate change and Hurricane Katrina? In the days after Aug. 29, 2005, when the world watched Hurricane Katrina become one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, a question reverberated through the public consciousness: Was climate change to blame?

Was there a link between climate change and Hurricane Katrina?

This question arose in part because of a desire after such terrible events to understand why they occur. Katrina killed an estimated 1,200 people and caused more than $100 billion in damage. But the question was also driven by an emerging public awareness of the changes that global warming might mean for the world’s weather, including hurricanes. At the time, scientists had few easy answers. Vanuatu’s president blames climate change for Cyclone Pam. This story was originally published by The Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

Vanuatu’s president blames climate change for Cyclone Pam

Cyclone Pam : certaines provinces de Vanuatu toujours injoignables. Le Monde.fr avec AFP, AP et Reuters | • Mis à jour le.

Cyclone Pam : certaines provinces de Vanuatu toujours injoignables

L'état d'urgence décrété au Vanuatu après le passage du cyclone Pam. Le Monde.fr avec AFP et Reuters | • Mis à jour le Les autorités du Vanuatu ont décrété l'état d'urgence dimanche 15 mars, un peu plus de vingt-quatre heures après le passage dévastateur du cyclone Pam, de catégorie 5 (le niveau maximal), vendredi.

L'état d'urgence décrété au Vanuatu après le passage du cyclone Pam

Le président de cet archipel du Pacifique Sud avait lancé un appel à l'aide internationale samedi, auquel a répondu François Hollande, exprimant son « plein soutien » à la population et promettant une assistance française. Le gouvernement, qui n'a pour l'heure fait aucun bilan, a confirmé la mort de six personnes à Port-Vila, la capitale, où 90 % des habitations ont été détruites selon l'organisation non gouvernementale Oxfam. Les Nations unies, qui envisagent de déployer des secours dimanche si les conditions le permettent, redoutent un nombre important de victimes. East Coasters, prepare for three decades of epic flooding. A new report finds that, thanks to sea-level rise, tidal floods are bathing East Coast cities more than ever.

East Coasters, prepare for three decades of epic flooding

And within the lifetime of a 30-year home mortgage, ever-higher high tides will swamp coastal communities with much more frequency and severity, according to projections based on analysis of 52 tide gauges between Maine and Texas. Suzanne Goldberg of The Guardian provides the deets: The report, “Encroaching Tides: How Sea Level Rise and Tidal Flooding Threaten U.S.

The Weather Channel has your forecast for 2050. Hello, America!

The Weather Channel has your forecast for 2050

La France va devenir plus chaude et la météo plus extrême. Un super typhon s'approche du Japon. Get ready for more “extreme” El Niños. Batten down the worldwide hatches.

Get ready for more “extreme” El Niños

Scientists say baby Jesus’ meteorological namesake will become a thundering hulk more often as the climate changes. The latest scientific projections for how global warming will influence El Niño events suggest that wild weather is ahead. El Niño starts with the arrival of warm water in the eastern Pacific Ocean, and it can culminate with destructive weather around the world.

It was named by Peruvian fishermen after the infant Jesus because the warm waters reached them around Christmas. We’ve previously told you that El Niños appear to be occurring more frequently as the climate has been changing. Extreme El Niños happened in the early 1980s and again in the late 1990s when surface water temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean shot up, triggering global weather pandemonium. Catastrophic floods occurred in the eastern equatorial region of Ecuador and northern Peru, and neighbouring regions to the south and north experienced severe droughts.

Typhon Haiyan, novembre 2013

Climate change expected to bring more thunder, hail, and tornadoes. Hail-spitting, tornado-spawning thunderstorms are likely to occur more frequently in the U.S. as the climate changes. That’s according to new research that found the two main ingredients needed to produce these intense storms are likely to occur simultaneously with growing frequency as greenhouse-gas levels continue their meteoric rise.

The research could help explain this spring’s remarkably deadly tornado season, though it doesn’t explain the long calm that preceded it. Severe thunderstorms typically occur when wind speeds high in the sky exceed those nearer the ground, and when there are also fast updrafts. As the climate changes, these two weather conditions will coincide more often, according to the results of modeling published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Sandy, 2012

Une "tempête du siècle" tous les 3 à 20 ans ? Si jusqu'à présent les tempêtes dévastatrices comme l'ouragan Irene ne se produisaient qu'une fois par siècle en moyenne, le réchauffement climatique risque de les rendre bien plus fréquentes. Des chercheurs américains affirment que "la tempête du siècle" pourrait survenir tous les trois à vingt ans. Des climatologues du Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) et de l'Université de Princeton affirment que le changement climatique va engendrer une augmentation de la fréquence des catastrophes naturelles, et notamment des tempêtes qui pourraient survenir tous les vingt ans, et selon les pires scénarios, tous les trois ans.

"La tempête du siècle", telle que le dévastateur ouragan Irène qui a frappé la côte est des Etats-Unis et les Caraïbes en août dernier, ne sera plus cet événement d'une violence si rare qu'il ne se produit en moyenne que tous les cent ans. Avez-vous déjà partagé cet article? Hawaii could be hit by more hurricanes as climate changes. Climate change could bring more hurricanes. Climate scientists have long predicted that cyclones and hurricanes would become more destructive as the climate changes, but that the number of such storms each year would decrease, or perhaps remain constant. That notion was challenged Monday by Kerry Emanuel, an atmospheric scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Emanuel’s computer models foresee stronger cyclones and hurricanes, in line with previous research, but they also foresee a growing number of the storms each year as warming continues.