background preloader

IPA Typewriter

IPA Typewriter
If the title above does not display correctly, you should click on "About" to find out how to get a unicode font. Introduction You can use this tool to type phonemic symbols to be inserted in a word processor. You can also use it to produce the code needed to insert phonemic symbols in a web page. To start work, use the buttons below to choose which you want to do. Use the "About" button to get more information about using phonetic symbols in word documents and web pages. Use the "Intro" button to get back to this page. I would be grateful for feedback about this tool. Word Processing Use the phonetic chart on the right to type the text that you want. When you are ready to copy what you have typed, first click the button below. Your text will appear in a pop-up window. Go to your word document and press Ctrl+V (Cmd+V in a Mac), or the Paste button, in order to paste in the word. You may need to adjust the font of the text in your document. Web Tool

http://www.e-lang.co.uk/mackichan/call/pron/type.html

Related:  TranscribersBOULOTLevel 3TEACHER EDUCATIONWebsites

IPA Phonetic Transcription of English Text Hi! Got an English text and want to see how to pronounce it? This online converter of English text to IPA phonetic transcription will translate your English text into its phonetic transcription using International Phonetic Alphabet. Paste or type your English text in the text field above and click “Show transcription” button (or use [Ctrl+Enter] shortcut from the text input area). Features: Choose between British and American* pronunciation. American History: The Civil Rights Movement STEVE EMBER: Welcome to THE MAKING OF A NATION – American history in VOA Special English. I’m Steve Ember. Today, we tell about the movement for civil rights for black Americans. The day is August twenty-eighth, nineteen sixty-three. More than two hundred fifty thousand people are gathered in Washington.

Leo’s bad luck – a lesson plan Ever since I read the great Listening in the Language Classroom by John Field, the book on developing listening skills, I became quite passionate about the need to consistently help learners cope with high frequency grammar structures in authentic speech, incorporating authentic listening work into grammar work. In the previous lesson on this blog the focus was on the way modals are pronounced. In this new video-based lesson based on an interview with Leonardo DiCaprio, the learners practice their speaking, grammar for story-telling and again practice listening decoding, focusing on target grammar. More specifically, the learners Videos used in the lesson:

Perspectives on developing a ‘learning organisation’ approach to PD – Part 1 This is the first in a short series of blog posts inspired by Adrian Underhill’s workshop on Developing a ‘learning organisation’ approach to PD, which he delivered at various locations in Australia recently. To find out more about Adrian Underhill, read his recent interview in the English Australia Journal. About the author: Aparna Jacob is a first-time Director of Studies at an LTO in Sydney. She is passionate about professional development for teachers and is keen on developing a learning culture at her organisation. Podcasts I believe that podcasts (done properly) are a great way to learn English. One of my favourite podcasts was EnglishPod and I was disappointed when it went offline a few months ago. The good news is that it's back in a revamped form.

Original Pronunciation The transcriptions David Crystal has used for OP have so far been semi-phonetic. They were intended for use by actors, some of whom would not be familiar with the Internal Phonetic Alphabet, and so, to aid learning, a simplified transcription was used. Only those sounds in Early Modern English phonology that are different from Present-Day English are shown with special symbols. The transcription was first devised in the context of British English Received Pronunciation, so the notion of ‘different from Present-Day English’ has to be interpreted accordingly when the transcriptions are read by people with different accent backgrounds. If you are a speaker with a post-vocalic /r/, for example, you would not need the special phonetic symbol for that sound.

Alphabet Lessons This EFL lesson is based around the alphabet, and an original short film called Alphabet by n9ve. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Support Film English Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. If you find any joy or value in it, please consider supporting Film English with a monthly subscription, or by contributing a one-off payment.

3 Amazing Videos to Raise Awareness and Get Your Learners Talking! - DreamreaderDreamreader I recently posted a blog post on Language Teaching Professionals about three awesome videos to inspire your learners. It was very well received so I thought I would do another post about videos. Click here if you haven’t read that post. Today I have chosen three more of my favorite videos that I show to inform my learners. All these videos got a fantastic response, so I hope you will find them useful. I teach at a university in Japan, and I considered all three to be suitable for adults. Top 50 Writing Blogs for 2015 Today I have the honor of announcing the Top 50 Writing Blogs for 2015! It’s hard to believe an entire year has passed and yet, here we are with a new list of awesome blogs, and we’ve expanded it from the Top 25 to the Top 50. How cool is that? The best-of-the-best are chosen for: 1} quality of content, 2} how routinely they are updated, 3} the amount of reader engagement (comments and social media shares, etc.), and 4} how long the blogs kept me glued to them.

Linkers and connectors - English Subject Area Contrast . In spite of / Despite Link two contrasting ideas. Followed by a noun phrase. Add Phonetic Transcription to English Subtitles – Online Converter. Send English subtitles: This online tool converts English subtitles into subtitles where all English text is either annotated by phonetic transcription or replaced with phonetic transcription (see examples below). The character set of the new subtitles file will be UTF-8. The only supported subtitles format is SubRip (*.srt). There is a limit on maximum size of input subtitles file – 300 KB. See also my English phonetic transcription converter. Everyday This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film called Everyday by Gustav Johansson and the theme of everyday routines and empathy. Students imagine and write about a day in the life of their partner, speak about their daily routines and watch a short film. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2)

The Seven Best Short Films for ELT Students - Kieran Donaghy I’ve been writing lesson plans designed around short films for my website Film English for six years. Teachers often ask me how I find the short films I use in my lesson plans. The answer is quite simple: I’ve watched literally thousands of short films and developed an instinct for the type of engaging and simple short films which will work in the ELT classroom. In this article I’d like to share what for me are the seven best short films for the language classroom.

Related:  mrs_mmakers / generators