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Tit for tat

Tit for tat
In Western business cultures, a handshake when meeting someone is an example of initial cooperation. Tit for tat is an English saying meaning "equivalent retaliation". It is also a highly effective strategy in game theory for the iterated prisoner's dilemma. The strategy was first introduced by Anatol Rapoport in Robert Axelrod's two tournaments,[1] held around 1980. Notably, it was (on both occasions) both the simplest strategy and the most successful.[2] An agent using this strategy will first cooperate, then subsequently replicate an opponent's previous action. Implications[edit] The success of the tit-for-tat (TFT) strategy, which is largely cooperative despite that its name emphasizes an adversarial nature, took many by surprise. Moreover, the TFT strategy has been of beneficial use to social psychologists and sociologists in studying effective techniques to reduce conflict. Problems[edit] "Tit for tat with forgiveness" is sometimes superior. Tit for two tats[edit] Real world use[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tit_for_tat

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