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Overview — Plagiarism.org - Best Practices for Ensuring Originality in Written Work

Overview — Plagiarism.org - Best Practices for Ensuring Originality in Written Work
Related:  PlagiarismISS Learning CommonsPlagiarism

Plagiarism Checker A list of key features: 1. Billions of web pages This tool has the ability to check plagiarism by matching your content against billions of webpages on the Internet. Once you upload your content, it will automatically run it against every existing content on the web within seconds, making it the most sophisticated yet fastest plagiarism scanner you'll ever come across in your lifetime. 2. It has an option for automatically rewriting the content you run on it in just one click. 3. Our similarity checker allows you to upload different formats of documents including .doc, .docx, .txt, .tex, .rtf, .odt, and .pdf. 4. With this free online plagiarism test tool, not only are you able to upload different formats of documents, you can also check plagiarism via a website URL. 5. Our anti-plagiarism engine comes with a reporting option which allows you to download a report of the plagiarism search you run. 6. How about an option for sharing the plagiarism report generated? 7. 8. Live in the cloud?

How Can Your Librarian Help Bolster Brain-Based Teaching Practices? Flickr/Kevin Harber Inquiry-based learning has been around in education circles for a long time, but many teachers and schools gradually moved away from it during the heyday of No Child Left Behind. The pendulum is beginning to swing back towards an inquiry-based approach to instruction thanks to standards such as Common Core State Standards for math and English Language Arts, the Next Generation Science Standards and the College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards. Transitioning to this style of teaching requires students to take a more active role and asks teachers to step back into a supportive position. It can be a tough transition for many students and their teachers, but turning to the school librarian for support could make the transition a little easier. “The inquiry process is brain-based from beginning to end,” said Ratzen, a former teacher, current librarian and adjunct professor in an edWeb webinar. The inquiry learning formula: Related

Guide to Preventing Plagiarism | Accredited Schools Online Students, particularly those in college, are expected to adhere to rigorous codes of conduct that stress academic integrity, including prohibitions against plagiarism. Steering clear of plagiarism, however, can be more difficult than it seems and the consequences can be severe. Fortunately, it’s a problem educators are devoting quite a bit of energy to, and there are new resources available to help students avoid the pitfalls of plagiarism. Read on to learn about practical preventative measures. What Is Plagiarism? In theory, plagiarism is a fairly simple concept: it involves stealing the words and/or ideas of another without attribution or acknowledgment. Merriam-Webster Dictionary: The act of using another person’s words or ideas without giving credit to that person. Council of Writing Program Administrators: In an instructional setting, plagiarism occurs when a writer deliberately uses someone else’s language, ideas, or other original material without acknowledging its source. Summary:

Frequently Asked Questions about Copyright and Fair Use What is fair use? The Copyright Act gives copyright holders the exclusive right to reproduce works for a limited time period. Fair use is a limitation on this right. Fair use allows people other than the copyright owner to copy part or, in some circumstances, all of a copyrighted work, even where the copyright holder has not given permission or objects. How does fair use fit with copyright law? Copyright law embodies a bargain. However, copyright law does not give copyright holders complete control of their works. By carving out a space for creative uses of music, literature, movies, and so on, even while the works are protected by copyright, fair use helps to reduce a tension between copyright law and the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of expression. How does the court know if a use is fair? Whether a use is fair will depend on the specific facts of the use. These factors are guidelines, and they are not exclusive. What has been recognized as fair use?

Plagiarism Tutorial: Test Your Knowledge Plagiarism is a serious academic offense! The University of Southern Mississippi's undergraduate and graduate bulletins both include statements about plagiarism: "When cheating is discovered, the faculty member may give the student an F on the work involved or in the course. "In addition to being a violation of academic honesty, cheating violates the code of student conduct and may be grounds for probation, suspension, expulsion, or all three." When a student avoids plagiarizing someone else's work, she or he doesn't just avoid doing something wrong.

21st-Century Libraries: The Learning Commons Libraries have existed since approximately 2600 BCE as an archive of recorded knowledge. From tablets and scrolls to bound books, they have cataloged resources and served as a locus of knowledge. Today, with the digitization of content and the ubiquity of the internet, information is no longer confined to printed materials accessible only in a single, physical location. Consider this: Project Gutenberg and its affiliates make over 100,000 public domain works available digitally, and Google has scanned over 30 million books through its library project. Libraries are reinventing themselves as content becomes more accessible online and their role becomes less about housing tomes and more about connecting learners and constructing knowledge. From Library to Learning Commons Printed books still play a critical role in supporting learners, but digital technologies offer additional pathways to learning and content acquisition. Photo credit: Francis W. Transparent Learning Hubs

The punishable perils of plagiarism - Melissa Huseman D’Annunzio The following are excellent resources for teachers and students regarding plagiarism and the proper citation of sources: The OWL at Purdue (Online Writing Lab) Here you'll find numerous articles on topics such as Contextualizing Plagiarism, Authorship and Popular Plagiarism, Copyright, Collaborative Authorship, Avoiding Plagiarism, Summarizing, Paraphrasing, Quoting, and using MLA and APA citations. Also, you can find extensive Research and Citation Resources on topics such as Conducting Research, Using Research, APA Style, MLA Style, and Chicago Manual of Style. The Plagiarism Spectrum: Instructor Insights into the 10 Types of Plagiarism TurnItIn, the study’s authors, polled both higher and secondary education instructors in order to produce this White Paper. Style Guides: - APA style for documentation is used in many of the social and behavioral sciences. - The rules of APA Style are detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Turabian:

8 Steps for Students to Remove Thier Digital Footprints September, 2014 One of the essential parts of the digital citizenship I have been long talking about in this blog is about digital footprints. Students need to know that whatever they do or create online leaves behind a trail or digital breadcrumbs that others can trace. This "others" can be anyone from prospective employers, to college admission boards, anything you do online should be vetted by a critical lens and if "you don't want your parents to know about it then better not do it". One of the simplest and effective ways to track your digital footprints is through Googling yourself. Step 1 Deactivate primary accounts ( e.g. Source of the visual Who Is Hosting This

Plagiarism What is Plagiarism and Why is it Important? In college courses, we are continually engaged with other people’s ideas: we read them in texts, hear them in lecture, discuss them in class, and incorporate them into our own writing. As a result, it is very important that we give credit where it is due. How Can Students Avoid Plagiarism? To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use another person’s idea, opinion, or theory; any facts, statistics, graphs, drawings—any pieces of information—that are not common knowledge; quotations of another person’s actual spoken or written words; or paraphrase of another person’s spoken or written words. These guidelines are taken from the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct. To help you recognize what plagiarism looks like and what strategies you can use to avoid it, select one of the following links or scroll down to the appropriate topic. How to Recognize Unacceptable and Acceptable Paraphrases Why is this passage acceptable?

Teaching Information/Research Skills in Elementary School | Langwitches Blog This post title is “Teaching Information/Research Skills in Elementary School”, but this post is as much for adults and older students. Many adults are overwhelmed with the quantity and new kind of media that is available and accessible through technology. Older students in High School and College might not feel overwhelmed, but have never been taught how to navigate, evaluate, save and retrieve the information that they are seeking. How and what kind of information skills do we need to start teaching in elementary school, that will grow and expand with our students as their grow older? What do teachers need to know in order to introduce and guide their students in a criticalefficienteffectivelysafeethical way as they navigating through the sea of information available? We need to help students develop these kind of information skills: locating informationevaluating informationlearning from informationusing (remix) information All About Explorers is well thought through. Reactions tend to vary.

Lines on Plagiarism Blur for Students in the Digital Age “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University. “It’s possible to believe this information is just out there for anyone to take.” Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it — many are champions of academic honesty on their campuses — but rather try to understand why it is so widespread. In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about 40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in written assignments. Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web constitutes “serious cheating” is declining — to 29 percent on average in recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade. Ms. Photo Ms. In the view of Ms.

klicksafe für Kinder Fülle nicht unüberlegt Formulare im Internet aus! Abzocke-Seiten versuchen mit allen möglichen Tricks, dir das Geld aus der Tasche zu ziehen. Viele gehen dabei unerlaubte Wege und setzen ihre Opfer unter Druck, indem sie Rechnungen und Mahnungen schicken oder mit Anwälten drohen.Wenn du in eine Kostenfalle getappt bist, erzähle deinen Eltern davon. >>Mehr erfahren Das solltest du zum Thema "Mobbing" wissen: Leider kommen Beleidigungen, Drohungen oder andere Gemeinheiten im Internet häufiger vor, besonders in Communities und Chats. Wenn dir im Internet jemand blöd kommt, zum Beispiel im Chat oder im Netzwerk, zeige ihm die kalte Schulter und ignoriere ihn.Verschweige niemals wenn du gemobbt wirst. Das solltest du wissen, wenn du chatten willst: Beachte die "Chatikette", so heißen die Regeln im Chat. Sei vorsichtig mit Downloads (= dem Herunterladen von Dateien aus dem Internet) - es kann sein, dass du etwas Verbotenes tust oder dir einen Virus einfängst! Wo kannst du dir Viren einfangen?

Excellent Video Clips on Plagiarism to Share with Your Students 1- What is Plagiarism 2- A Quick Guide to Plagiarism 3- Plagiarism: a film by Murdokh 4- Avoid Plagiarism in Research papers with paraphrases and quotations 5- Before he cheats: A teacher parody 6- 10 types of plagiarism Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to assess its level of accuracy, reliability, and bias. In 2012, my colleagues and I assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, and the results definitely got our attention. Unfortunately, over 70 percent of the students’ responses suggested that: Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue, or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective When they do refer to source features in their explanations, their judgments are often vague, superficial, and lacking in reasoned justification Other studies highlight similar shortcomings of high school and college students in these areas (see, for example, a 2016 study from Stanford). So what can you do to more explicitly teach adolescents how to evaluate the quality of online information?

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