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Ten Politically Incorrect Truths About Human Nature

Ten Politically Incorrect Truths About Human Nature
Human nature is one of those things that everybody talks about but no one can define precisely. Every time we fall in love, fight with our spouse, get upset about the influx of immigrants into our country, or go to church, we are, in part, behaving as a human animal with our own unique evolved nature—human nature. This means two things. First, our thoughts, feelings, and behavior are produced not only by our individual experiences and environment in our own lifetime but also by what happened to our ancestors millions of years ago. Second, our thoughts, feelings, and behavior are shared, to a large extent, by all men or women, despite seemingly large cultural differences. Human behavior is a product both of our innate human nature and of our individual experience and environment. The implications of some of the ideas in this article may seem immoral, contrary to our ideals, or offensive. Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters, Related:  My Mental Studies

Top 100 Personal Development Blogs Personal development can affect all aspects of your life, from controlling your negative thoughts to gaining the self-confidence to excel at work. If you’re in need of some inspiration to get you on the right road to improving yourself, the Internet is full of blogs that can offer guidance, advice and support to aid you in your journey. We’ve brought together 100 here, in no particular order, to help you get started. Must Read These are some of the most popular personal development blogs out there, so make sure to add them to your bookmarks. Work Development Learn to take control of your career and get things on the right track with a little help from these work-related sites. Get Organized It’s hard to get much accomplished when you’re living in clutter. Financial Development These blogs will help you get your finances in order and put your mind at ease. Coaches and Consultants Get some advice from these professionals in personal development. Self-Improvement Productivity Miscellaneous

Procrastination: Ten Things To Know Is your procrastination hindering you? Ten things you should know. There are many ways to avoid success in life, but the most sure-fire just might be procrastination . Procrastinators sabotage themselves. They put obstacles in their own path. They actually choose paths that hurt their performance. Why would people do that? Twenty percent of people identify themselves as chronic procrastinators. It's not trivial, although as a culture we don't take it seriously as a problem. Procrastination is not a problem of time management or of planning. Procrastinators are made not born. Procrastination predicts higher levels of consumption of alcohol among those people who drink. Procrastinators tell lies to themselves. Procrastinators actively look for distractions, particularly ones that don't take a lot of commitment on their part. There's more than one flavor of procrastination. arousal types, or thrill-seekers, who wait to the last minute for the euphoric rush.

List of Cognitive Biases Cognitive biases are tendencies to think in certain ways that can lead to systematic deviations from a standard of rationality or good judgment, and are often studied in psychology and behavioral economics. There are also controversies over some of these biases as to whether they count as useless or irrational, or whether they result in useful attitudes or behavior. For example, when getting to know others, people tend to ask leading questions which seem biased towards confirming their assumptions about the person. Although this research overwhelmingly involves human subjects, some findings that demonstrate bias have been found in non-human animals as well. Decision-making, belief, and behavioral biases[edit] Many of these biases affect belief formation, business and economic decisions, and human behavior in general. Social biases[edit] Most of these biases are labeled as attributional biases. Memory errors and biases[edit] Common theoretical causes of some cognitive biases[edit] Notes[edit]

Discovering Assumptions The instructor strode into the classroom empty handed. He nodded to the class and checked his watch. Seven P.M. Donning his spectacles, the instructor groped in his pocket for a scrap of paper. The instructor, an oversized, stern-looking character in his thirties, grasped the lectern with both hands and gazed intently at his new charges. "I have just written a number on a piece of paper," he said. The sound of scuffing feet. "I'll give you a hint," the instructor spoke solemnly. "Do you understand the question?" No answer. "I have written a number between one and a thousand on a piece of paper," said the instructor. A bearded chap, probably a graduate student, hesitated. The instructor cupped his hand behind his ear. Bearded Chap shrugged. "One moment please." "One?" "Was that a guess, too?" Gray Suit grinned. "How about 999?" The instructor squinted. A young man in checkered shirt raised his hand timidly. "Why didn't you say 'two'?" "Thought I'd save some time," chuckled Checkered Shirt.

10 Life-Enhancing Things You Can Do in Ten Minutes or Less It usually takes us much longer to change our moods than we’d like it to take. Here are ten things you can do in ten minutes or less that will have a positive emotional effect on you and those you love. . See it online at Oprah.com . . . . The experience will fill you with fond memories and perhaps make you a bit wistful for days gone by. . . Then spend that time just holding each other. Studies show that hospital patients who can see a natural body of water from their beds get better at a 30 percent faster rate. Shake, twist, and jump around. Sadly, many people measure happiness by how long the experience lasts. Dr. Top 10 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging You (and How to Beat It) @Firesphere: Not that I don't believe you, but do you have a source for that? @inverts: I did, it was an article on a Dutch website. I'm searching for an English source. It was testet with CAT scans etcetera, the male brain showed indeed no activity when asked to "shut your eyes and calm down, think of as less as possible" Where the female brain kept being active. *Searches on* A funny side-fact on this: "Female" gays, seem to never be able to "shutdown" where as "male" lesbians were able to completely stop thinking. Sorry, I am unable to find the article I got this information from. If I find it again, I'll let it know offcourse. @Firesphere: The article suggests from that information, that those with a "masculine" mindset (for lack of a better term) can shut their brains down; "feminine" brains always have at least one task running then?

How the Brain Stops Time One of the strangest side-effects of intense fear is time dilation, the apparent slowing-down of time. It's a common trope in movies and TV shows, like the memorable scene from The Matrix in which time slows down so dramatically that bullets fired at the hero seem to move at a walking pace. In real life, our perceptions aren't keyed up quite that dramatically, but survivors of life-and-death situations often report that things seem to take longer to happen, objects fall more slowly, and they're capable of complex thoughts in what would normally be the blink of an eye. Now a research team from Israel reports that not only does time slow down, but that it slows down more for some than for others. An intriguing result, and one that raises a more fundamental question: how, exactly, does the brain carry out this remarkable feat? Researcher David Eagleman has tackled his very issue in a very clever way . Was it scary enough to generate a sense of time dilation?

Hedgehog's Dilemma Both Arthur Schopenhauer and Sigmund Freud have used this situation to describe what they feel is the state of individual in relation to others in society. The hedgehog's dilemma suggests that despite goodwill, human intimacy cannot occur without substantial mutual harm, and what results is cautious behavior and weak relationships. With the hedgehog's dilemma, one is recommended to use moderation in affairs with others both because of self-interest, as well as out of consideration for others. The hedgehog's dilemma is used to explain introversion and isolationism. Schopenhauer[edit] The concept originates in the following parable from the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer's Parerga und Paralipomena, Volume II, Chapter XXXI, Section 396:[1] A number of porcupines huddled together for warmth on a cold day in winter; but, as they began to prick one another with their quills, they were obliged to disperse. Freud[edit] Social psychological research[edit] References[edit]

What is a logical fallacy? A "fallacy" is a mistake, and a "logical" fallacy is a mistake in reasoning. There are, of course, other types of mistake than mistakes in reasoning. For instance, factual mistakes are sometimes referred to as "fallacies". However, The Fallacy Files is specifically concerned with logical errors, not factual ones. A logical error is a mistake in an argument, that is, a mistake in an instance of reasoning formulated in language. There are two types of mistake that can occur in arguments: A factual error in the premisses. In logic, the term "fallacy" is used in two related, but distinct ways. "Argumentum ad Hominem is a fallacy." In 1, what is called a "fallacy" is a type of argument, so that a "fallacy" in this sense is a type of mistaken reasoning. Clearly, these two senses are related: in 2, the argument may be called a "fallacy" because it is an instance of Argumentum ad Hominem, or some other type of fallacy. History Sources: Why study fallacies?

Top 10 Explanations for The Bermuda Triangle The Bermuda Triangle, as we call it today, was coined by the writer Vincent Gaddis in 1964 when he wrote a cover story for Argosy magazine about the strange disappearance of Flight 19. Also known as ‘The Devil’s Triangle’ or the ‘Isle of Devils’, the Bermuda Triangle is popularly thought to be an area in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida to one small island in Bermuda to an island in Puerto Rico. From point to point the area spans into an imaginary triangle. According to many scientists today, however, the only boundaries it truly defines are the ones between fantasy and fiction. The Bermuda Triangle is inaccurately known as a place where more ships and planes have mysteriously disappeared than anywhere else in the world, but why? Here are the top ten reasons the Bermuda Triangle has received a reputation as a possible epicenter of alien abductions, ghost ships, sea monsters, time portals, and other madness and mayhem. 10. 9. 8. 7. 6. 5. 4. 3. 2.

What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Weaker Friedrich Nietzsche, the German philosopher, famously said: "That which does not kill us makes us stronger." This notion found life beyond Nietzsche's--which is ironic, his having been rather short and miserable--and it continues to resonate within American culture. One reason is that suffering, as Freud famously recognized, is an inevitable part of life. Another reason is that American culture, born of trauma and imbued with a hopeful can-do ethos, wants to believe this idea, finding it self-affirming. Another reason we think trauma may be transformative is that we see variants of this process around us. Now it is true that, in an evolutionary sense, those who survive a calamity are by definition the fittest. Our brain is a meaning-making machine, designed to sort vast and varied sensory information into coherent, orderly perception, organized primarily in the form of narrative: this happened, which led to that, which ended up so . Do not thrive on adversity As do we.

How We Shoot Ourselves in the Foot in Committed Relationships Falling in love is as natural as death. Staying in love is as natural as good diet and healthy exercise. We can eat, exercise, and love well in the short run, but over the long haul of everyday modern living, we tend to shoot ourselves in the foot. That's because, like toddlers, we try to do these things in the wrong part of our brains. Below are two of the major ways we shoot ourselves in the foot when it comes to love. The biggest mistake we make in love is assuming that our partners' experience is the same as ours and that events and behaviors should mean the same to them as they do to us. The illusion of sameness allows us to create some measure of safety in the face of the awful vulnerability that new intimate connections evoke. "Our hearts beat as one." "We're soul mates." "We're so close that we complete each other's sentences." "She really believes in me." "He really me." A severe limitation of empathy in intimate relationships is its susceptibility to the illusion of sameness.

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