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"Then and now", celebrations, lifestyle, school etc.

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How times change. Days of the Week Song | The Singing Walrus. Skwirk Stage 1: Months and Seasons. Games children play | State Library of NSW. A student: HT1-3 describes the effects of changing technology on people’s lives over time HT1-4 demonstrates skills of historical inquiry and communication Students: Comprehension: chronology, terms and concepts sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031, ACHHS047) distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032, ACHHS048) Use of sources explore and use a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034, ACHHS05) identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035, ACHHS051) Empathetic understanding recognise that people in the local community may have lived differently in the past Research pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033, ACHHS049) Explanation and communication develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037, ACHHS053) use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038, ACHHS054) Learning across the curriculum Literacy Critical and creative thinking.

Playgrounds, billycarts and hot rods - History (1,2) Sydney doll hospital - ABC online education. Transcript 00:00:00:00Dolls' heads on a shelf. Dolls' legs hanging up.00:00:00:00REPORTER:Has your doll lost its head? Or perhaps it's missing a leg or two. Well, you're in the right place. The Sydney Doll Hospital is celebrating 100 years of being in operation.00:00:06:15A shop.00:00:06:15GEOFF CHAPMAN:It's great, and very satisfying work.00:00:08:05Archival footage of the doll hospital.00:00:08:05REPORTER:65-year-old Geoff Chapman was born into the business, and he's the third generation of his family to run it.00:00:12:05GEOFF CHAPMAN:My grandfather developed it, found it was reasonably lucrative, so he branched into doing all sorts of toys, mainly dolls.00:00:17:00More archival footage of the various previous shops.00:00:17:00REPORTER:Originally established in Campsie, the hospital later moved to Her Majesty's Arcade in Sydney, before being relocated to its current location in Bexley, in Sydney's south, in 1968.

Robots, monsters and rocking horses - ABC online education. Cooking food in the past and present - ABC online education. Holidays, past and present | State Library of NSW. A student: HT1-1 communicates an understanding of change and continuity in family life using appropriate historical TERMS HT1-4 demonstrates skills of historical inquiry and communication Students: Comprehension: chronology, terms and concepts distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032, ACHHS048) Use of sources explore and use a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034, ACHHS050) identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035, ACHHS051) Empathetic understanding recognise that people on the local community may have lived differently in the past Research pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033, ACHHS049) Explanation and communication develop a narrative about the past (ACHHS037, ACHHS053) use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS038, ACHHS054) Learning across the curriculum Literacy Numeracy Information and communication technology capability.

Whose shoes? | State Library of NSW. A student: HT1-4 demonstrates skills of historical inquiry and communication Students: Comprehension: chronology, terms and concepts sequence familiar objects and events (ACHHS031, ACHHS047) distinguish between the past, present and future (ACHHS032, ACHHS048) Use of sources explore and use a range of sources about the past (ACHHS034, ACHHS050) identify and compare features of objects from the past and present (ACHHS035, ACHHS051) Research pose questions about the past using sources provided (ACHHS033, ACHHS049) Explanation and communication use a range of communication forms(oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS03, ACHHS054) Continuity and change: some things change over time and others remain the same Empathetic understanding: developing an understanding of another’s views, life and decisions made Significance: importance of an event, development or individual/group Learning across the curriculum Critical and creative thinking Literacy.

Life Then, Life Now Travel back in time as you learn about what life was like long ago. By the end o ... Outback House (tv series episode); arrival of the hawker - ABC online education. Transcript 00:00:00:00The hawker's wagon approaches the homestead.00:00:01:05NARRATOR:Throughout much of the 19th century, ex-Indian army soldiers roamed the outback as hawkers, selling everything from pots and pans to confectionery.00:00:06:23KARAN SINGH:Come on, come on.00:00:07:23NARRATOR:For isolated squatter families and their workers, a visit from a hawker was an exciting break from the constant drudgery of station life.00:00:13:00CLAIRE WILLIAMS:The hawker's here! The hawker's here! Oh, no way! (Laughs) Look at you! How's it going, guys? 00:00:17:05KARAN SINGH:Hello, missy. How are you, missy? This house: settling in Broome (game) - ABC online education. Sovereign Hill Promotional Video.

BBC Bitesize - What were classrooms like 100 years ago? School in the 1940s - History (1,2,3) 00:00:00:00Black-and-white archival footage of a bus arriving at the Barossa District Technical School. A sign reads, 'Day and evening classes.' Young boys walk inside. In a classroom, a teacher works with the boys on carpentry. In another room, girls jump over a vaulting horse. In yet another room, young children play at tables, watched by female teachers. Some children cut up plasticine, others hammer toy wooden pegs into holes. A boy rings a bell outside and a marching band plays a militaristic drum roll. First day jitters - History (1) Transcript Footage of parents and children on a busWOMANSchool's down here. We've gotta go... (Speaks indistinctly)A boy jostles another boy out of the way, pushing him overBOYBoom! Children walk into school, some joined by a parentWOMANIsn't it gonna be good! Finally, we go back to school with all the children. Bell's gone! - History (1,2)

What's for lunch on the first day of school? - ABC online education. Twinkle, twinkle, little ducks - ABC online education. Henry's life. BOY: My names Henry. This is my place. And when we grow up, me and my friend Franklin are going to start a company. -Mller and Wong. -Wong and Mller. One, two, three. We will make amazing things. FRANKLIN: More testing needed. HENRY: But it works, pretty much.

FRANKLIN: Pa reckons trial and error is the best teacher. FRANKLIN: Oh, no. Mei-Lin! Mei-Lin loves our inventions. FRANKLIN: Bet Ma doesnt know shes here. Sorry, Henry. Come on, little sister. HENRY: Hey, wait for me! Its a big day for Mller and Wong self-lighting candles. Shouldnt we give the new models a trial run first? Theyre our most amazing invention so far. They cant go wrong. George! Your nephew has blown up our schoolhouse. And its not just the schoolhouse. I fear for the safety of the other students.

But hes such a bright boy. He may hurt someone. KARL: Maybe its time he started working with me in the saddlery. WOMAN: But, Karl, he needs a proper education. Im sorry, Minna. Henry is expelled. Oh, um, how about you learn -I can do that. Right. Good. History - School of the Air-Broken Hill (download the 1965 magazine) From the early 1900's, the education of isolated children across Australia was catered for by the Correspondence Schools in the capital cities of their respective states. Lessons took days and sometimes weeks to reach their destinations and by the time the completed lessons were dispatched to their teachers, marked and returned to the children, months could have elapsed.

As these children rarely had an opportunity to visit their teachers at the Correspondence School, the children inevitably completed their entire schooling without ever meeting their teacher or schoolmates. The aim of School of the Air was to bring isolated children out of the silence and give them a sense of belonging. The first "School of the Air" in Australia was established at Alice Springs on 8th June 1951. The radio network, maintained by the Royal Flying Doctor Service, was used by the school to make two-way broadcasts to the children in that area via HF Radio. Following a visit to Central Australia, the Hon. Digital learners out bush - ABC Splash - ABC Splash - Imagine if your school day kicked off with lessons with a governess, was peppered with tales from the mouths of travellers and wrapped up with a spot of horseriding.

Sounds like something out of a 19th century novel, right? Well, schools with this sort of routine are a little closer to home than you might think. Welcome to the School of the Air, originating in Australia in 1946 when Adelaide Mithke, vice-president of the South Australian Royal Flying Doctor Service, came up with the idea. A few years later, in 1948, the first lessons were broadcast to children in remote areas from the Alice Springs RFDS base. The Mount Isa School of the Air (MISOTA), which has been in operation since 1964, is one of six distance education schools in Queensland.

"The majority of our students live on remote properties in Queensland and the Northern Territory," she says. Sounds simple enough. Nine-year-old School of the Air student Lucy tuned in to ‘Let's Draw' from her home in northern Queensland. Celebrations and traditions - ABC online education. The feast - ABC online education. Easter symbols - ABC online education. NATASHA THIELE, REPORTER: This is what you might picture when you think of Easter. But what does a bunny, eggs and buns have in common?

Well, there are meanings behind each one, so let's go on an Easter journey to find out. Easter is one of the most sacred holidays on the Christian calendar. Good Friday represents the day Jesus Christ died on the cross and Easter Sunday is a celebration of when he rose from the dead. It's a time when families get together and go to church; some Christians will even fast, giving up something they really like for 40-days in the lead-up to Easter. This period is called 'Lent', and it's meant to teach sacrifice and self-discipline. But Easter wasn't always a Christian festival; some people believe Easter traditions go back to the Pagan religion, which was more about nature.

She's said to have brought new life to things like dying plants and flowers. But it's not just the rabbits that have become a symbol of Easter, there are the eggs too! In the past: Christmas in the city - History (1,2) In the past: Christmas at a bush school - History (1,2) A Christmas lights extravaganza - ABC online education. The weatherman's Christmas pudding - ABC online education. More info Copyright Metadata © Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Education Services Australia Ltd 2012 (except where otherwise indicated). Digital content © Australian Broadcasting Corporation 2012 (except where otherwise indicated). Video © Australian Broadcasting Corporation (except where otherwise indicated). Text © Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Education Services Australia is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0).

Cite this You can use this information to reference this item. Bibliographic details for 'The weatherman's Christmas pudding': ABC Open, 'The weatherman's Christmas pudding', ABC Splash. Celebrating achievements - History (F,1) Celebrating a baby's baptism - History (F,1)