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Humans Need Not Apply

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Pq-S557XQU

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Irreversible Damage Seen From Climate Change in UN Leak Humans risk causing irreversible and widespread damage to the planet unless there’s faster action to limit the fossil fuel emissions blamed for climate change, according to a leaked draft United Nations report. Global warming already is affecting “all continents and across the oceans,” and further pollution from heat-trapping gases will raise the likelihood of “severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts for people and ecosystems,” according to the document obtained by Bloomberg. “Without additional mitigation, and even with adaptation, warming by the end of the 21st century will lead to high to very high risk of severe, widespread, and irreversible impacts globally,” the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in the draft. Related: The study is the most important document produced by the UN about global warming, summarizing hundreds of papers. It’s designed to present the best scientific and economic analysis to government leaders and policymakers worldwide.

After Killing More than 1,600 People This Drone Operator Called It Quits Joshua Krause The Daily Sheeple January 26th, 2015 Reader Views: 3,504 For nearly 5 years, Brandon Bryant served in the United States Air Force as part of a crew that piloted one of America’s drones. During this time, it’s estimated that he played a role in killing 1,626 people. But after logging thousands of hours of flight time, and giving the military some of the best years of his life, he decided that he’d had enough.

If Schools Don't Change, Robots Will Bring On a 'Permanent Underclass': Report Robots are taking all the jobs. But are we, the average, moderately skilled humans, screwed, or aren't we? Let me just get it out of the way now: We are, unless there are drastic, immediate changes to education and economic systems around the world.

It's No Myth: Robots and Artificial Intelligence Will Erase Jobs in Nearly Every Industry - Singularity HUB With the unemployment rate falling to 5.3 percent, the lowest in seven years, policy makers are heaving a sigh of relief. Indeed, with the technology boom in progress, there is a lot to be optimistic about. Manufacturing will be returning to U.S. shores with robots doing the job of Chinese workers; American carmakers will be mass-producing self-driving electric vehicles; technology companies will develop medical devices that greatly improve health and longevity; we will have unlimited clean energy and 3D print our daily needs. The cost of all of these things will plummet and make it possible to provide for the basic needs of every human being.

Amanda Cummings’ Memorial Facebook Page Peppered with Insults, Obscenities As of Friday morning, the R.I.P. Amanda Cummings Facebook page contains obscene and mocking images, videos and comments; some of them made fun of her for fatally jumping in front of a bus. Most of the comments on the page, however, were sympathetic towards Cummings and against those who are insulting her. I hope all of you posting the bus pictures are having fun because I will sit here all day if I have to and report every single one of you!

Spin From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Spin or spinning may refer to: In mathematics, science and technology[edit] In computing[edit] In telecommunications[edit] Robot Room Service is Here Mar 6, 2015 At the Aloft Silicon Valley Hotel in Newark, California, robots provide the room service! When the robot is outside your door it will call your room and let you know your delivery is outside. Don't Fear the Robots Taking Your Job, Fear the Monopolies Behind Them As algorithms and automatons start to code and roll their way into our workplaces, there’s a looming sense that employment is set for a pretty major shift. Maybe not quite yet, but slowly and surely, the robots are showing themselves to be capable of taking on jobs once held by humans. They’re more accurate than us, more consistent; they run for longer, they’re satisfied with their work (or at least not unsatisfied), and they don’t kick up a fuss about a living wage. But to worry about robots “stealing our jobs”—an oversimplified rhetoric that sounds all too familiar—is to ignore the greater potential upheaval in our economy. That future societal change was the subject of discussion at a panel last night hosted by Nesta in London, which brought figures from the fields of technology and economics together to share some of the visions conjured by their crystal balls.

When Machines Can Do Most Jobs—Passion, Creativity, and Reinvention Rule - Singularity HUB Not long ago, schoolchildren chose what they wanted to be when they grew up, and later selected the best college they could gain admission to, spent years gaining proficiency in their fields, and joined a company that had a need for their skills. Careers lasted lifetimes. Now, by my estimates, the half-life of a career is about 10 years. I expect that it will decrease, within a decade, to five years. Advancing technologies will cause so much disruption to almost every industry that entire professions will disappear. And then, in about 15–20 years from now, we will be facing a jobless future, in which most jobs are done by machines and the cost of basic necessities such as food, energy and health care is negligible — just as the costs of cellphone communications and information are today.

Pourquoi les meilleurs esprits de Tech sont très inquiets de l'internet des objets Illustration: Pat Kinsella The Internet of Things is coming. And the tech cognoscenti aren’t sure that’s a good thing. For years, the prospect of an online world that extends beyond computers, phones, and tablets and into wearables, thermostats, and other devices has generated plenty of excitement and activity. But now, some of the brightest tech minds are expressing some doubts about the potential impact on everything from security and privacy to human dignity and social inequality.

What College Can’t Do - The New Yorker There’s a special joy in giving someone advice that’s sure not to be followed—“Wake up at the same time every morning”; “Don’t check your e-mail while on vacation”—and William Deresiewicz must have felt it when writing his recent cover story for The New Republic, “Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League.” Hypercompetitive colleges, Deresiewicz wrote, are the replicators of the ruling class, recruiting and training “young people who are smart and talented and driven, yes, but also anxious, timid, and lost, with little intellectual curiosity and a stunted sense of purpose.” Better to go to a state school, where the student body is more socioeconomically diverse, or to a “second-tier” liberal-arts college, where “real educational values” persist, than to submit yourself or your child to the careerist “machine” of élite higher education. To think about busyness in terms of modernity is to think about its deep roots. In many ways, élite colleges are premodern places.

Robot Spider Army Responds to Hand Signals Using New Intel Processor by Kristan T. Harris A robot spider army that can be controlled by body gestures and hand movements has been developed by Intel.

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