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How Nanotechnology Works"

There's an unprecedented multidisciplinary convergence of scientists dedicated to the study of a world so small, we can't see it -- even with a light microscope. That world is the field of nanotechnology, the realm of atoms and nanostructures. Nanotechnology i­s so new, no one is really sure what will come of it. Even so, predictions range from the ability to reproduce things like diamonds and food to the world being devoured by self-replicating nanorobots. In order to understand the unusual world of nanotechnology, we need to get an idea of the units of measure involved. A centimeter is one-hundredth of a meter, a millimeter is one-thousandth of a meter, and a micrometer is one-millionth of a meter, but all of these are still huge compared to the nanoscale. As small as a nanometer is, it's still large compared to the atomic scale. In a lecture called "Small Wonders:The World of Nanoscience," Nobel Prize winner Dr. In the next section, we'll learn more about our world on the nanoscale.

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Overview of Nanotechnology Nanotechnology draws its name from the prefix "nano". A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter—a distance equal to two to twenty atoms (depending on what type of atom) laid down next to each other. Nanotechnology refers to manipulating the structure of matter on a length scale of some small number of nanometers, interpreted by different people at different times as meaning anything from 0.1 nm (controlling the arrangement of individual atoms) to 100 nm or more (anything smaller than microtechnology). At the small end of this scale, the structure is controlled to atomic precision—each atom is exactly where it should be for the optimum function of the material or the device. The Foresight Institute is focused on this small end of the scale: atomically-precise manufacturing or "molecular manufacturing". Life is the Existence Proof for Atomically Precise Technology

Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News Biofilms—the eradication has begun Have you ever heard of biofilms? They are slimy, glue-like membranes that are produced by microbes, like bacteria and fungi, in order to colonize surfaces. They can grow on animal and plant tissues, and even inside the human ...

Small world by Ralph C. Merkle Xerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 merkle@xerox.com This is an extended web version of the article published in the Feb/Mar 1997 issue of MIT Technology Review. This version has greater technical detail and embedded links. Electric motor made from a single molecule 5 September 2011Last updated at 08:56 By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News The butyl methyl sulphide molecule whips round an axis defined by its single sulphur atom (blue) Researchers have created the smallest electric motor ever devised. The motor, made from a single molecule just a billionth of a metre across, is reported in Nature Nanotechnology. Tiny brains created from SKIN could lead to cures for disorders like schizophrenia and autism Scientists used stem cells to grow 3D tissue that mimics a brainThe cells displayed an organisation similar to that seen in the early stages of the developing human brain's cerebral cortex - also known as grey matterThe miniature brains helped the researchers identify a defect that affects normal brain development in microcephaly leading to a smaller brainThe findings could eventually lead to treatments for other neurological disorders By Emma Innes Published: 18:19 GMT, 28 August 2013 | Updated: 00:00 GMT, 29 August 2013 A ‘brain in a bottle’ has been grown by stem cell scientists who hope it will lead to treatments for neurological and mental diseases.

Publications - Cookie absent This site uses cookies to improve performance. If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site. Setting Your Browser to Accept Cookies There are many reasons why a cookie could not be set correctly. Below are the most common reasons: Carbon nanotubes in photovoltaics Organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) are fabricated from thin films of organic semiconductors, such as polymers and small-molecule compounds, and are typically on the order of 100 nm thick. Because polymer based OPVs can be made using a coating process such as spin coating or inkjet printing, they are an attractive option for inexpensively covering large areas as well as flexible plastic surfaces. A promising low cost alternative to silicon solar cells, there is a large amount of research being dedicated throughout industry and academia towards developing OPVs and increasing their power conversion efficiency.[1][2]

Easy and effective therapy to restore sight: Engineered virus will improve gene therapy for blinding eye diseases Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed an easier and more effective method for inserting genes into eye cells that could greatly expand gene therapy to help restore sight to patients with blinding diseases ranging from inherited defects like retinitis pigmentosa to degenerative illnesses of old age, such as macular degeneration. Unlike current treatments, the new procedure is quick and surgically non-invasive, and it delivers normal genes to hard-to-reach cells throughout the entire retina. Over the last six years, several groups have successfully treated people with a rare inherited eye disease by injecting a virus with a normal gene directly into the retina of an eye with a defective gene.

Columbia Engineers Prove Graphene is Strongest Material July 21, 2008 Columbia Engineers Prove Graphene is the Strongest Material Research scientists at Columbia University’s Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science have achieved a breakthrough by proving that the carbon material graphene is the strongest material ever measured. Graphene holds great promise for the development of nano-scale devices and equipment.

Optical properties of carbon nanotubes Within materials science, the optical properties of carbon nanotubes refer specifically to the absorption, photoluminescence (fluorescence), and Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanotubes. Spectroscopic methods offer the possibility of quick and non-destructive characterization of relatively large amounts of carbon nanotubes. There is a strong demand for such characterization from the industrial point of view: numerous parameters of the nanotube synthesis can be changed, intentionally or unintentionally, to alter the nanotube quality. As shown below, optical absorption, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies allow quick and reliable characterization of this "nanotube quality" in terms of non-tubular carbon content, structure (chirality) of the produced nanotubes, and structural defects.

Nanotechnology Nanotechnology ("nanotech") is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology[1][2] referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology. A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter that occur below the given size threshold. Origins[edit] Comparison of Nanomaterials Sizes

Tiny buckyballs squeeze hydrogen like giant Jupiter (3/21/2008) Carbon cages can hold super-dense volumes of nearly metallic hydrogen Hydrogen could be a clean, abundant energy source, but it's difficult to store in bulk. In new research, materials scientists at Rice University have made the surprising discovery that tiny carbon capsules called buckyballs are so strong they can hold volumes of hydrogen nearly as dense as those at the center of Jupiter. The research appears on the March 2008 cover of the American Chemical Society's journal Nano Letters. "Based on our calculations, it appears that some buckyballs are capable of holding volumes of hydrogen so dense as to be almost metallic," said lead researcher Boris Yakobson, professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Rice.

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