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The far future of humans and intelligence in the universe — episodes with Ray Kurzweil

The far future of humans and intelligence in the universe — episodes with Ray Kurzweil
Closer to Truth | Ray is a world-renowned inventor, computer scientist, innovative futurist and best-selling author. He founded four technology companies based on his revolutionary inventions in artificial intelligence, including reading machines for the blind, speech recognition, and music synthesis. Ray was the principal developer of the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first CCD flat-bed scanner, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large vocabulary speech recognition. He has successfully founded, developed, and sold four AI businesses in OCR, music synthesis, speech recognition, and reading technology. Watch this video with Ray Kurzweil on Closer to Truth: What is the far future of humans in the universe? All of these technologies continue today as market leaders.

http://www.kurzweilai.net/closer-to-truth-episodes-kurzweil

Related:  ThinkingTruth, Literature, and LearningA I / Robotics et al.

The Meaning of Life (or, What's it all about?) Now available in Spanish! (Traduccin de hsu - midipaj@arrakis.es ) Let's step back a moment... Critical thinking web We have over 100 online tutorials on different aspects of thinking skills. They are organized into modules listed below and in the menu above. Our tutorials are used by universities, community colleges, and high schools around the world. The tutorials are completely free and under a Creative Commons license. More info Maintained by Joe Lau, Philosophy Department, University of Hong Kong.

Calum Chace Artificial Intelligence I’ve read a couple of your books now, and what I want to know is this: Do you really think that artificial intelligence is a threat to the human race and could lead to our extinction? Yes, I do, but it also has the potential for enormous benefit. I do think it’s probably going to be either very, very good for us or very, very bad. It’s a bit like a strange attractor in chaos theory, the outcomes in the middle seem less likely. I’m reasonably hopeful because what will determine whether it’s very good or very bad is largely us. We have time, certainly before artificial general intelligence (AGI) arrives.

Mind as Separate Self - Atma Nadi Shakti Yoga and Klick Klack a Beezone Study of Adi Da Samraj 's Teaching Word Beezone Study Adapted and edited from various talks and writings of Adi Da Samraj The Separate "self" Does Not Exist - Except in Mind Atma Nadi Shakti Yoga "The individual separate self, sense or ego is a reflection...which is mind or the differentiating power, realized by experience..." Invisible Man - Adi Da Samraj 1975 "Realization is the realization of that which is already prior to thinking" Adi Da Samraj - 2004 12 Brain Rules Buy Brain Rules Also by Pear Press The Brain Rules, illustrated Explore each rule through illustrations, charts and video. These tutorials are designed to reinforce the concepts in the book; we recommend reading the corresponding chapter first. SURVIVAL: The human brain evolved, too.

Singularitarianism Singularitarianism is a technocentric ideology and social movement defined by the belief that a technological singularity—the creation of superintelligence—will likely happen in the medium future, and that deliberate action ought to be taken to ensure that the Singularity benefits humans. Singularitarians are distinguished from other futurists who speculate on a technological singularity by their belief that the Singularity is not only possible, but desirable if guided prudently. Accordingly, they might sometimes dedicate their lives to acting in ways they believe will contribute to its rapid yet safe realization.[1] Some critics argue that Singularitarianism is a new religious movement promising salvation in a technological utopia.[3] Others are concerned that the interest in the Singularity by corporate and military interests provides a clue as to the real direction and social implication of emerging technologies celebrated by Singularitarians.[4]

50 Life Secrets and Tips Memorize something everyday.Not only will this leave your brain sharp and your memory functioning, you will also have a huge library of quotes to bust out at any moment. Poetry, sayings and philosophies are your best options.Constantly try to reduce your attachment to possessions.Those who are heavy-set with material desires will have a lot of trouble when their things are taken away from them or lost. Possessions do end up owning you, not the other way around. Become a person of minimal needs and you will be much more content.Develop an endless curiosity about this world.Become an explorer and view the world as your jungle. Stop and observe all of the little things as completely unique events. Try new things.

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Think of your laptop as a machine like the one at the gym where you open and close your inner thighs in front of everyone, exposing both your insecurities and your genitals. Because that is what writing is all about. Procrastination is an alluring siren taunting you to google the country where Balki from Perfect Strangers was from, and to arrange sticky notes on your dog in the shape of hilarious dog shorts.

I Have Seen The Future, And Its Sky Is Full Of Eyes Allow me just a little self-congratulatory chest-beating. Four years ago I started writing a near-fiction thriller about the risks of swarms of UAVs in the wrong hands. Everyone I talked to back then (including my agent, alas) thought the subject was implausible, even silly. Well, it’s not like I’m the next Vernor Vinge — it always seemed like a pretty blatantly obvious prediction to me — but I am pleased to see that drones and drone swarms have finally become the flavor of the month. In the last month, the Stanford Law Review has wrung its hands about the “ethical argument pressed in favor of drone warfare,” while anti-genocide activists have called for the use of “Drones for Human Rights” in Syria and other troubled nations; the UK and France declared a drone alliance; and a new US law compels the FAA to allow police and commercial drones in American airspace, which may lead to “routine aerial surveillance of American life.”

Table of contents (With last update date) Cover Foreword (August 13, 2009) Part 1. 5 Ways to Get Rid of Your Damn Empty Modifiers I discussed the need to get rid of empty emphatics when I gave you 8 words to seek and destroy in your writing, but just saying that you should get rid of a thing doesn't say much about the right way to do so. Today I'm going to show you a few of my favorite ways to get rid of your empty modifiers. What exactly is an empty modifier? It's any word whose only role is to intensify the word it's modifying. Class 17 - Deep... Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 17 - Deep Thought He is an essay version of class notes from Class 17 of CS183: Startup. Errors and omissions are mine. Three guests joined the class for a conversation after Peter’s remarks: D.

SARCASM IN RELATIONSHIPS Sarcasm – a mocking or ironic remark (American Heritage Dictionary) Irony – the use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning (American Heritage Dictionary) Sarcasm is a large component of social interaction and conversation. To demonstrate a sense of humor, people frequently use sarcasm as a means of “breaking the ice” during initial encounters with others. People also use sarcasm as a means of being comedic with groups of friends.

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