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16 Of The Most Magnificent Trees In The World

16 Of The Most Magnificent Trees In The World
How do I love thee, tree? Let me count the ways; you change carbon dioxide into the oxygen we breathe, you sequester carbon, and you provide shelter for countless critters. There are many reasons for which we should all be tree-hugging hippies, but within the scope of this article, all we’ll focus on is how amazing some of them look. Granted, not all of these amazing beautiful trees are trees (the Wisteria is a vine, Rhododendrons are shrubs, and bamboo technically belongs to the grass family), but we’ll give them a pass because they are amazing, huge and beautiful. So once you step outside and take a breath of fresh air, hug the nearest tree and say thank you! If you know of an amazing tree not on this list, you can submit it at the bottom of this post. 125+ Year Old Rhododendron “Tree” In Canada This huge 125-year-oldold rhododendron is technically not a tree – most are considered to be shrubs. 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Image credits: tungnam.com.hk Wind-Swept Trees In New Zealand

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Might Alien Life Evolve Like the Incredible Octopus? by Natalie Shoemaker Consider the octopus: a creepy skeleton-less creature with limbs that have regenerative properties and a mind of their own. Its structure — inside and out — makes it like no other animal on earth. blind artist envisions the world through hypnotizing animated gifs click 2x sep 09, 2015 blind artist envisions the world through hypnotizing animated gifs blind artist envisions the world through hypnotizing animated gifsall gifs courtesy of george redhawk artist george redhawk has turned a loss into a gift — after the artist became legally blind, he began to explore the realm of photo manipulation with a desire to show the world as he sees it from his damaged sight. through the use of computer softwares that aide the visually impaired, redhawk — who works under the name darkangeløne — has realized the ongoing series of animations titled, ‘the world through my eyes’. original digital art ‘the remains of a memory’ by adam martinakis / animation by george redhawk ‘to create most of my gifs, I am using a photo morphing software which I have been experimenting with, and perfecting over several years‘, redhawk tells graphic art news.

Tree Encyclopedia 2 clicks to really open Trees have three principle features that distinguish them from all other plants. First, they have a woody stem, roots and branches which do not die back in winter, but continue to grow year after year. From the moment of its germination, a tree remains visible; from the tallest Sequoia to the smallest garden fruit tree, this principle of growth remains constant. Trees live longer than any other organism on earth.

Rio Olympics 2016: Artist JR honors a Sudanese athlete who's missing the Olympics, with a towering mural in Rio — Quartz “The goal of Olympism is to place sport at the service of the harmonious development of humankind, with a view to promoting a peaceful society concerned with the preservation of human dignity,” reads one of the fundamental principles of Olympism (pdf, p.13), also known as the philosophy of the Olympic games. Time and again, the Olympic games have served to reflect and even amplify this spirit. It has allowed people to represent their countries—even if they weren’t officially recognized by their neighbors or members of the United Nations.

Beautiful World of Sea Slugs-click on pic On land, slugs are far from nature's most beautiful creatures--but underwater, the family of shell-less creatures known as nudibranchs come in bright neons, glowing pastels, and vibrant primary colors. The 3,000 different kinds of nudibranchs get their color from the food they eat--and, in some cases, secrete the poisons from their prey to defend themselves against predators. The Fried Egg Nudibranch gets its name from the perfect yellow-and-white circles that line its back. These nudibranchs grow to about three inches long, and live in the waters of the Pacific and the Red Sea. Click through for more brilliant 'branches in a rainbow of colors.

The Mohawks Who Built Manhattan (Photos) For generations, Mohawk Indians have left their reservations in or near Canada to raise skyscrapers in the heart of New York City. High atop a New York University building one bright September day, Mohawk ironworkers were just setting some steel when the head of the crew heard a big rumble to the north. Suddenly a jet roared overhead, barely 50 feet from the crane they were using to set the steel girders in place. “I looked up and I could see the rivets on the plane, I could read the serial numbers it was so low, and I thought ‘What is he doing going down Broadway?’” recalls the crew’s leader, Dick Oddo. Crew members watched in disbelief as the plane crashed into one of the towers of the World Trade Center, just 10 blocks away.

Nudibranchs - The Flamboyant Sea Slug nicoboxethai/CC BY 2.0 Nudibranch, or what we usually call sea slugs, blow my mind. Ever since spotting one for myself during a tide pool trip about a year ago, I've been fascinated with these creatures. Mohawk Ironworkers “Top Off” the new One World Trade Center. For more than a century, Mohawk ironworkers have helped shape New York City’s famous skyline. They built them in the early 70s, they were there to pick up the pieces when terrorists knocked them down during 9/11, and they were there to top off the newest tower in 2013. Following in the footsteps of their fathers and grandfathers, a new generation of Mohawk iron workers descended upon the World Trade Center site, helping shape the most distinct feature of Lower Manhattan, the same iconic structure some of their fathers and grandfathers helped erect 40 years ago and later dismantled after it was destroyed in 2001.

The adorable “sea bunny” - a nudibranch It’s round, and fluffy and has wiggly little ears! Sort of. These little sea creatures, affectionately dubbed “sea bunnies” have recently become social media celebrities. They’re actually sea slugs, and belong to the wild group of mollusks called nudibranchs. The bunny slug species is Jorunna parva, and was first described by the renowned Japanese marine biologist Kikutaro Baba. françois beaurain animates everyday life in liberia 2 clicks trust me, look aug 23, 2016 françois beaurain animates everyday life in liberia since 2014, françois beaurain has been artistically animating the lively streets of monrovia — the capital city of liberia. through an ongoing series series of short, looping gifs, beaurain immortalizes the people met and places visited while wandering through the coastal region. typical scenes of street life are imagined in perpetual motion, repeating the often mundane, yet mesmerizing actions of the citizens in endless loops. beaurain uses a variety of architectural and urban settings as a backdrop — the ducor hotel, a now abandoned, but once five-star luxury accommodation; the former mount coffee hydropower plant; a few of the city’s countless evangelical churches; and beaches inhabited by fishing communities, located a few kilometers outside of monrovia. nina azzarello I designboom

these amazing tiny spiders - 2 clicks Sparklemuffin and Skeletorus sound like names my daughters would choose for a stuffed animal or an avatar, but no, these are the real names given by scientists to two newly discovered Peacock spiders. Peacock spiders are known for their flamboyant colors and dance steps, so entomologist decided to have fun with their names too. Skeletorus, which is more formally known as Maratus sceletus, was named for its unusual black and white skeleton-like pattern. Image credit: Jurgen Otto via Flickr

This was an amazing post! Nature can display some beautiful variations. by essieadelanwa Aug 26

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