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Literature Map - The Tourist Map of Literature

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Galaxy Magazine : Free Texts : Download & Streaming Sep 1, 2017 by Andy Khoo texts eye favorite 2 comment 0 96 Incredibly Useful Links for Teaching and Studying Shakespeare The idea of tackling Shakespeare in school has sometimes sent chills down both students’ and teachers’ spines, but the truth is that studying Shakespeare doesn’t have to be so daunting. His plays and sonnets are filled with themes that are relevant even today, are humorous, lyrical, and provide important historical content. Most importantly, Shakespeare knew how to tell a good story.

Must See Picture Books for Kids! Below is a continuation of our big list of Caldecott Award winners. The books listed on this page of our list are surely some of the most stunning and extraordinary picture books for kids that have ever been published. Each one merits the honor. Caldecott Committee: We agree! Invitation to World Literature Greek, by Euripides, first performed in 405 BCE The passionate loves and longings, hopes and fears of every culture live on forever in their stories. Here is your invitation to literature from around the world and across time. Sumerian, 2600 BCE and older Turkish, by Orhan Pamuk, 2000 Greek, by Homer, ca. eighth century BCE Greek, by Euripides, first performed in 405 BCE Sanskrit, first century CE Japanese, by Murasaki Shikibu, ca. 1014 Chinese, by Wu Ch'êng-ên, ca. 1580 Quiché-Mayan, written in the Roman alphabet ca. 1550s French, by Voltaire, 1759 English, by Chinua Achebe, 1959 Spanish, by Gabriel García Márquez, 1967 English, by Arundhati Roy, 1998 Arabic, first collected ca. fourteenth century

Frequently challenged books of the 21st century Each year, the ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom compiles a list of the top ten most frequently challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship in libraries and schools. The ALA condemns censorship and works to ensure free access to information. A challenge is defined as a formal, written complaint, filed with a library or school requesting that materials be removed because of content or appropriateness. The number of challenges reflects only incidents reported. The 100 Best Horror Movies of All Time This list has been a long time coming for Paste. We are fortunate—some would say “cool enough”—to have quite a lot of genre expertise to call upon when it comes to horror in particular. Several Paste staff writers and editors are lifelong horror geeks, and there’s also a strong sentiment toward the macabre among several of our more prolific contributing writers.

Overlooked classics: The Member Of The Wedding by Carson McCullers Carson McCullers only wrote four novels, but that's hardly surprisingly; outside writing, she had a fair bit to contend with. She contracted rheumatic fever at 15 and then suffered two severe strokes before reaching 30, which left her paralysed in her left arm. In her 40s, she had operations on her arm and wrist, underwent a mastectomy and broke her hip; in 1967, at the age of 50, she died. Her love life was no less turbulent.

Google Tutorials This page contains tutorials for using Google tools. The tutorials that I've created you are welcome to use in your own blog, website, or professional development session. Before using the tutorials created by others, please contact their creators. Google Docs for Teachers 2012 Google for Teachers

The Sound of the Mountain The Sound of the Mountain (Yama no Oto) is a novel by Japanese writer Yasunari Kawabata, serialized between 1949 and 1954. The Sound of the Mountain is unusually long for a Kawabata novel, running to 276 pages in its English translation. Like much of his work, it is written in short, spare prose akin to poetry, which its English-language translator Edward Seidensticker likened to a haiku in the introduction to his translation of Kawabata's best-known novel, Snow Country. Sound of the Mountain was adapted as a film of the same name (Toho, 1954), directed by Mikio Naruse and starring Setsuko Hara, So Yamamura, Ken Uehara and Yatsuko Tanami. For the first U.S. edition (1970), Seidensticker won the National Book Award in category Translation.[1]

The Man Booker and Nobel judges are right: novels can do us good October is the biggest month of the year for those in the literary world. This year, the Nobel Prize for Literature awarded to Patrick Modiano and the Man Booker Prize, to Richard Flanagan for The Narrow Road to the Deep North, attracted a flurry of discussion, as always, about the prizes and whether the judging panels “got it right”. But if the two most influential annual literary prizes are an indication of the contemporary canon, this is an opportune moment to think about the role of literature and reading, about what we value, now. Prize-winning books are not just well-written, even though American critic Harold Bloom, the man who put himself in charge of the canon, emphasised aesthetic quality as the signifier of literary excellence. He resented what he saw to be the politicisation of the canon – and, by extension, the award of major literary prizes – “in the name of social justice”, as he put it.

15 Smartest Sci-Fi Movies Of All Time Denis Villeneuve’s much-anticipated sci-fi film Arrival has finally…err…arrived in theaters and is already generating the kind of buzz that we’ve come to associate with instant classics. Viewers are praising the film’s stunning cinematography, the commanding performance of Amy Adams, and off-the-charts entertainment value, but mostly, they are praising the film’s intelligence. What’s funny about most of the praise for the movie’s smarts is that it’s usually accompanied by just a hint of surprise. “A science fiction movie that has proven to be among the smartest films released this year?”, some skeptics say with shock in their eyes. “Who would have imagined that?”

45 Great Sourced Quotes about Books The best quotes about books, from some of the most famous writers in the world Here is a list of our favourite quotes about books from various writers, some famous, some not so famous. We’ve only included those quotations for which we’ve managed to track down a source, whether in print or online, so you know these are authentic quotes about books, rather than of the amusing-but-apocryphal kind. When I was a child I read books far too old for me and sometimes far too young for me.

Tech Tools by Subject and Skills Every year, so many new technology tools for teachers are launched into the market that it can be nearly impossible to keep up with them all. In order to keep you up-to-date with the latest and greatest educational tech tools, our team of edtech specialists has put together this list of the best edtech resources and technology tools for teachers. Clicking on the links below will take you to hundreds of apps, websites, extensions, and more. Whether you're looking for a specific tech tool or just trying to find something new and interesting for your class, we encourage you to browse around all of the different categories to see how many wonderful resources are available for your students. Also, if you have a tool that you'd like to see added to the list, please feel free to contact us at admin@edtechteacher.org.

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