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Luminarium: Anthology of English Literature

Luminarium: Anthology of English Literature

http://www.luminarium.org/

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Greek and Latin Texts Part of the opening lines of Frontinus's book on the water supply of Rome (13th- or 14th- centurya manuscript: Codex Cassinensis 361) Anthem Essay Contest — Ayn Rand Education Anthem Essay Contest Information Topics Select ONE of the following three topics: In Chapter 8, why does Equality laugh when he remembers that he is "the Damned"? Aside from very rare exceptions there is literally no opposition to the leaders in this society. Why is this?

5 Amazing Libraries You Didn't Know You Had Access To Suz Massen, Chief of Public Services at the Frick Art Reference Library was gracious enough to come in and speak to my Intro to Reference class at Pratt Institute this week and I was surprised and excited to find out that the Frick Library is freely available to the public! This got me wondering what other great libraries are out there which I thought were closed and private that actually allow the general public access without having to apply as a researcher. Here are five amazing libraries you might not realize you have access to: 1.) The Library of Congress The Main Reading Room in the Library of Congress includes a collection of over 66, 000 volumes, their Computer Catalogue Center, and access to over 800 databases, around 600 of which can only be used on-site at the library.

British Library’s Catalog of Illuminated Manuscripts Generous Permissions The British Library began the digital catalog in 1997. Currently the catalog provides a digital record of 4,231 different manuscript, and includes 35,661 images those manuscripts, with a searchable database. The images were scanned following the best digital practices, and include provenance, metadata, and in many cases, detailed images. Black Knights, Green Knights, Knights of Color All A-Round: Race and the Round Table The three-posts-a-week thing is not my best plan so far, but we will hit twelve posts this fine month of October. It will happen. However, not all of them are going to be clever sciencey posts. American Teilhard Association / teilhards-quotes “Seeing. One could say that the whole of life lies in seeing — if not ultimately, at least essentially. To be more is to be more united — and this sums up and is the very conclusion of the work to follow. But unity grows, and we will affirm this again, only if it is supported by an increase of consciousness, of vision.

The Fountainhead Essay Contest — Ayn Rand Education The Fountainhead Essay Contest Information Topics Select ONE of the following three topics: At the end of Part II, Ellsworth Toohey confronts Howard Roark and says, "Mr. Roark, we're alone here. Why don't you tell me what you think of me?" Invitation to World Literature Greek, by Euripides, first performed in 405 BCE The passionate loves and longings, hopes and fears of every culture live on forever in their stories. Here is your invitation to literature from around the world and across time. Sumerian, 2600 BCE and older Turkish, by Orhan Pamuk, 2000 Greek, by Homer, ca. eighth century BCE Greek, by Euripides, first performed in 405 BCE Sanskrit, first century CE Japanese, by Murasaki Shikibu, ca. 1014 Chinese, by Wu Ch'êng-ên, ca. 1580 Quiché-Mayan, written in the Roman alphabet ca. 1550s French, by Voltaire, 1759 English, by Chinua Achebe, 1959 Spanish, by Gabriel García Márquez, 1967 English, by Arundhati Roy, 1998 Arabic, first collected ca. fourteenth century

Town Chronicles in the Holy Roman Empire: Legitimacy and Historical Construction – January 10, 2009Posted in: Articles Town Chronicles in the Holy Roman Empire: Legitimacy and Historical Construction By Ernst Reigg Paper given at The Contours of Legitimacy in Central Europe: New Approaches in Graduate Studies (2002) Synopsis: Examines the historiography of the town chronicles in Germany from the Middle Ages to the 18th century, to examine their relationship with the Holy Roman Empire. Britain's black power movement is at risk of being forgotten, say historians Britain's black power movement is being written out of recent cultural history because it does not fit into the "utopian" narrative of the UK being a nation of civilised fair play, a new book argues. The authors of the work, the first detailed history of black power in Britain, argue that an important chapter of recent cultural history is in danger of being forgotten. The Cambridge academic Robin Bunce said: "There is a fundamental danger of erasing the very notion of a struggle at all. I've been researching this for four and a half years and there have been so many occasions when people have said to me: 'There was no black struggle in Britain. You're thinking of South Africa or America.'

Works of Humanist Erasmus  Ongoing exhibition, opened April 11, 2008. Throughout his life, Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826) collected books across a vast spectrum of topics and languages. Jefferson followed a modified version of an organizational system created by British philosopher Francis Bacon (1561–1626) to arrange the books in his library, then the largest private book collection in North America. Divided into categories of Memory, Reason, and Imagination—which Jefferson translated to “History,” “Philosophy,” and “Fine Arts”—and further divided into forty-four “chapters,” the collection placed within Jefferson’s fingertips the span of his multifaceted interests. The books from Jefferson’s library are part of the Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress.

What is Teaching with Text Sets? NOTE: This was originally published on "The Classroom Bookshelf" blog on October 1, 2012. We wrote Teaching with Text Sets because we have witnessed the power of children’s literature to engage students, inspire deep content exploration, and differentiate instruction. We’ve also seen the potential for digital multimodal texts, like the kinds we regularly include in our Classroom Bookshelf blog entries, to transform K-8 classrooms. Over the years, the teachers with whom we work at Lesley University have expressed the desire to teach using multimodal, multigenre text sets, but feel that they lack the resources, time, support, as well as the strategies that we have developed over the years.

The Sound of the Mountain The Sound of the Mountain (Yama no Oto) is a novel by Japanese writer Yasunari Kawabata, serialized between 1949 and 1954. The Sound of the Mountain is unusually long for a Kawabata novel, running to 276 pages in its English translation. Like much of his work, it is written in short, spare prose akin to poetry, which its English-language translator Edward Seidensticker likened to a haiku in the introduction to his translation of Kawabata's best-known novel, Snow Country. Sound of the Mountain was adapted as a film of the same name (Toho, 1954), directed by Mikio Naruse and starring Setsuko Hara, So Yamamura, Ken Uehara and Yatsuko Tanami. For the first U.S. edition (1970), Seidensticker won the National Book Award in category Translation.[1] Plot[edit]

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