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Literably: the easiest way to assess reading

Literably: the easiest way to assess reading

https://literably.com/

Related:  Reading SkillsAssessment Tools & SQ3R

Poetry Editor & Poetry: 10 Ways to Read a Poem 1. Get comfy and enjoy your first reading. Relax into the experience without trying to analyze anything. 2. Read the poem again, this time aloud. Listen for the musicality. How To Design A 21st Century Assessment - View Original Photo This is my 200th Blog Post on ASCD EDge. I wanted it to be memorable and exciting and EDgy and relevant to what’s going on in classrooms right now. So I want to share a bit of my Digigogy with you. While I’ve used the term Digigogy in blog posts before, and written about in books, I don’t think I’ve ever defined it in a blog post. Foundational Reading and Language Standards Resources Package for Grades 3-5 The EL Education Common Core–aligned ELA modules for grades 3–5 were designed to helpteachers build students’ capacity to read, think, talk, and write about complex texts. The modules fully address the reading standards for both literary and informational texts, the writing standards, and the speaking and listening standards. Foundational reading and language also are addressed within the context of the module lessons; these standards are more heavily emphasized in specific modulelessons within Module 2B.

Reading Strategies Reading is a skill that is used in all subject areas and can greatly increase or decrease a student’s success in the classroom. Reading strategies can be used to vary the approach students are given of any given text. Some reading strategies are summarized below. Activating prior knowledge Activating prior knowledge is a reading strategy that occurs before the student is introduced to reading material. The teacher uses a prereading activity, which can be done in the form of a journal or class discussion. 27 Teacher Actions That Help Promote Valid Assessment Data Via TeachThought There is often talk about assessment–its forms, frequency, and the integration of gleaned data to revise planned instruction. Formative versus assessment, rigor, and the evasive nature of understanding are also areas for exploration. But rarely is there discussion about the kinds of things teachers can do–literal actions and concrete strategies–to help streamline the assessment process, and hopefully produce purer results you can trust. In the infographic below, Mia MacMeekin offers her now familiar “27 ways” format, this time teacher actions that are conducive to more valid assessment results–and thus data you can trust. Coupled with our 10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds Or Less, that’s several dozen simple formative assessment forms and strategies to add to your teacher tool set.

Teacher Education Center-Lesson Plans Why do good readers ask themselves questions about what they have just read? (Students respond.) Right. After you have predicted and clarified, you should ask good questions about what you have read for at least two reasons. One reason is to test yourself to see if you really understand what you have read. The other reason is to identify what is important to remember in the story or the passage. Ten Creative Alternatives to Standardized Tests It's easy to bust on standardized tests. They suck. They're boring. They're virtually meaningless. They kill instructional time. But what's the alternative?

The Art of Close Reading (Part Three) In the previous two columns we introduced the idea of close reading, emphasizing the importance of the following: To read well, in addition to having the above understandings, students must be able to identify the big picture within a text, to determine the key ideas within the text early on, and to see the scaffolding that connects all the ideas within the text. In other words, they need to develop structural reading abilities. Moreover, students need to see that there are generalizable skills one must develop to read sentences and paragraphs well. In addition, students must develop reading skills specific to reading certain kinds of texts – like textbooks, newspaper articles and editorials. In this column we will focus on the theory of close reading.

Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding What strategy can double student learning gains? According to 250 empirical studies, the answer is formative assessment, defined by Bill Younglove as "the frequent, interactive checking of student progress and understanding in order to identify learning needs and adjust teaching appropriately." Unlike summative assessment, which evaluates student learning according to a benchmark, formative assessment monitors student understanding so that kids are always aware of their academic strengths and learning gaps.

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