background preloader

John Hattie, Visible Learning. Pt 2: effective methods.

John Hattie, Visible Learning. Pt 2: effective methods.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pD1DFTNQf4

Related:  Instruction explicite

Explicit Teaching: A Lesson Structure That Delivers Results How should you organise your lessons? What lesson structure should you adopt? Your answer to these questions will have a profound effect on how successful your lessons will be. There are many options available. What works in education – Hattie’s list of the greatest effects and why it matters [UPDATE February 2015: Over the past few years, numerous people have commented on my last paragraph as being an overstated and overheated conclusion, unwarranted by the data and of no help in advancing reform. Fair enough: I have come to think that they are correct. So, a new concluding comment is attached, with the old concluding paragraph available for inspection. I agree with my critics: there is no need to pile on teachers in this era of teacher-bashing – and it was not my point. My point was to say: we can improve learning, so let’s do it.] [UPDATE 11/2014: There have been recent reports suggesting that some of Hattie’s math is flawed.

Teacher credibility: why it matters and how to build it DEAD POETS SOCIETY, Robin Williams, 1989 When your students view you as a credible teacher, they are more likely to do well in school. According to John Hattie’s latest results (2016), teacher credibility has a massive impact (d = 0.9) on the subsequent learning that happens in the classroom. To put this in perspective, teacher credibility has more than twice the impact of student motivation. This doesn’t mean that student motivation is not important – it is.

138 Influences Related To Achievement - Hattie effect size list John Hattie developed a way of synthesizing various influences in different meta-analyses according to their effect size (Cohen’s d). In his ground-breaking study “Visible Learning” he ranked 138 influences that are related to learning outcomes from very positive effects to very negative effects. Hattie found that the average effect size of all the interventions he studied was 0.40. Therefore he decided to judge the success of influences relative to this ‘hinge point’, in order to find an answer to the question “What works best in education?” Originally, Hattie studied six areas that contribute to learning: the student, the home, the school, the curricula, the teacher, and teaching and learning approaches.

Lesson Goals: A Quick Way to Boost Student Achievement Great lessons start with a clear focus and lesson goals provide that focus. Do you want to help more of students to succeed? Would you like to push each child to new levels of personal excellence? Then try setting lesson goals every day. Research1 shows that teachers who are clear about what they want their students to learn as a result of each lesson have a higher impact on their students’ results. Focusing students’ attention and activity is a core part of evidence based teaching.

Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies Most teachers care about their students’ results. If you are reading this article, you are undoubtedly one of them. There is no doubt that teachers make a difference to how well their kids do at school. However, when you explore the thousands of research studies1 on the topic, it is apparent that some teaching strategies have far more impact than other teaching strategies do. Teacher Student Relationships Crucial to Results Strong teacher student relationships are crucial. To a large extent, the nature of your relationship with your students dictates the impact that you have on them. If you want to have a positive and lasting difference on your kids, you need to forge productive teacher student relationships. Advocates of evidence based education know that students who have constructive relationships with their teachers are more likely to do well at school, and teachers who actively build such relationships have a strong effect on the lives of their students.

Top 10 Behaviour Management Strategies Most teachers are not surprised to learn that successful behaviour management is crucial to both students’ success and to their own sanity. However, you may not be sure which behaviour management strategies have the most impact. When behaviour management is talked about in many schools, the conversation focuses on the: Importance of rules and routinesAppropriateness of punishments or consequencesNeed for ‘admin’ to do something about it How to Give Effective Feedback to Your Students When John Hattie reviewed over 500,000 research studies, he found that feedback had more impact on student results than any other teaching strategy. By the time he conducted his latest review, published in Visible Learning, he had added an extra 300,000+ studies to his database, and feedback still comes out on top1. In all aspects of life, feedback is the breakfast of champions. It lets you know how you are going while also telling you how you can improve. You can use feedback to improve how well your students do at school.

10 Things Every Teacher Should Know Before Starting Their First Day In The Classroom Are you a new teacher? Do you know a new teacher, or do you have new teachers on your staff this year? If so, I think you’ll find this valuable. It is my list of the top 10 things I believe every new teacher should know before they start their first day of teaching. The list is based on research on teacher attrition, input from respected colleagues and my own personal experience. Don’t believe everything you’ve been told.

Teachers: your guide to learning strategies that really work Research on effective learning reveals that an awful lot of what goes on in the classroom simply doesn’t matter. There are many pointless activities that take up valuable time in the name of engagement, merely demonstrating progress as opposed to actually making progress. Often, these approaches not only have limited impact on student learning but can have a hugely detrimental impact on teacher workload and wellbeing. There is significant evidence to suggest that teachers should prune back what they do and focus on a more streamlined approach in the classroom.

Related: