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What works in education – Hattie’s list of the greatest effects and why it matters

What works in education – Hattie’s list of the greatest effects and why it matters
I have been a fan of John Hattie’s work ever since I encountered Visible Learning. Hattie has done the most exhaustive meta-analysis in education. Thanks to him, we can gauge not only the relative effectiveness of almost every educational intervention under the sun but we can compare these interventions on an absolute scale of effect size. Perhaps most importantly, Hattie was able to identify a ‘hinge point’ (as he calls it) from exhaustively comparing everything: the effect size of .40. Anything above such an effect size has more of an impact than just a typical year of academic experience and student growth. And an effect size of 1.0 or better is equivalent to advancing the student’s achievement level by approximately a full grade. The caveat in any meta-anlysis, of course, is that we have little idea as to the validity of the underlying research. Can you guess the next two items on the rank order list? “Home environment” and “socio-economic status.” Like this: Like Loading...

http://grantwiggins.wordpress.com/2012/01/07/what-works-in-education-hatties-list-of-the-greatest-effects-and-why-it-matters/

Related:  John Hattie, Visible LearningVisible LearningAssessment for learningHattie och Visible learning

Teachers toolbox - Professor John Hattie's Table of Effect Sizes Hattie says ‘effect sizes' are the best way of answering the question ‘what has the greatest influence on student learning?'. An effect-size of 1.0 is typically associated with: • advancing learners' achievement by one year, or improving the rate of learning by 50% • a correlation between some variable (e.g., amount of homework) and achievement of approximately .50 What works best This page has now been revised (May 2010) in the light of John Hattie's recent apparently definitive work Visible Learning; a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement (London; Routledge, 2009). The first thing to change has been the title, which used to be "What works and what doesn't". Hattie points out that in education most things work, more or less. The questions are around those which work best and therefore best repay the effort invested. This site is mainly about your own individual practice as a teacher, and as such it tries to take into account your particular circumstances, such as the students you teach (assumed largely to be over school-age), your subject, your setting (school, college, university, work-based or informal adult education). It recognises that it is difficult and even unreasonable to generalise, but we ought to set alongside this the results of very generalised research in the form of meta-analyses.

What can we learn from John Hattie Ask not what works; instead ask: what works best? ‘Perhaps education’s equivalent to the search for the holy grail…’ (TES) “It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.” John Hattie's Eight Mind Frames For Teachers “Hattie’s 8 Mind frames”. Video scribe project by Cheryl Reynolds. In Visible Learning for Teachers (p. 159 ff) John Hattie claims that “the major argument in this book underlying powerful impacts in our schools relates to how we think! It is a set of mind frames that underpin our every action and decision in a school; it is a belief that we are evaluators, change agents, adaptive learning experts, seekers of feedback about our impact, engaged in dialogue and challenge, and developers of trust with all, and that we see opportunity in error, and are keen to spread the message about the power, fun, and impact that we have on learning.” John Hattie believes “that teachers and school leaders who develop these ways of thinking are more likely to have major impacts on student learning.”

Visible Learning: 800+ Meta Studies And 138 Effects Visualized John Hattie has synthesized more than 800 meta-studies related to achievement. In his book Visible Learning he found 138 influences with positive and negative effects on learning outcomes. Some of Hattie’s critics state that comparing so many different things would be like comparing apples and oranges. But is it? The following visualizations show how many studies Hattie actually read and synthesized for his ground-breaking meta-meta-study on what works in the classroom. How many meta-studies has John Hattie synthesized for each of the 138 influences? You Can't Teach Understanding You Can’t Teach Understanding by Grant Wiggins, Ed.D, Authentic Education A cardinal principle in aiming at understanding is that understanding requires different pedagogy than acquisition of knowledge and skill. Knowledge and skills are best developed by direct instruction and reinforcement if we want recall and fluency. Understanding, however, involves something beyond mere acquisition for later straightforward use.

Questioning and Feedback: Top Ten Strategies As part of our whole staff training at Huntington School we have been sharing ideas and collating ‘Top Ten Strategies’. This list is the fruits of our labour: 1. Differentiated questioning. Given the time we take doing it daily, effective questioning may well be the highest impact strategy we can employ. There is no ‘one size fits every class’ strategy. Glossary of Hattie's influences on student achievement This Glossary explains influences related to student achievement published in John Hattie’s Visible Learning for teachers (Hattie 2012; 251ff). You can find an older list of influences related to student achievement in Hattie (2009) Visible Learning. 1. Student Self-Reported Grades

Making Thinking Visible – Headlines Routine Project Zero, an educational research group at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, has been working to enhance student learning, thinking and creativity since the 1960s. Founded by the philosopher Nelson Goodman it’s impacted global education and been guided by such education luminaries as Howard Gardner and David Perkins. Utilizing it’s core concepts and adding a dash of Socrative will bolster student reflection, critical thinking, and creativity while developing independent learners for the 21st century. Let’s Dig In!

Is the Feedback You’re Giving Students Helping or Hindering? In 38% of well-designed studies, feedback actually made performance worse—one of the most counterintuitive results in all of psychology. If there’s a single principle teachers need to digest about classroom feedback, it’s this: The only thing that matters is what students do with it. No matter how well the feedback is designed, if students do not use the feedback to move their own learning forward, it’s a waste of time.

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