background preloader

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers
According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common: Learning focuses around a meaningful, ill-structured problem that demands consideration of diverse perspectivesAcademic content-learning occurs as a natural part of the process as students work towards finding solutionsLearners, working collaboratively, assume an active role in the learning processTeachers provide learners with learning supports and rich multiple media sources of information to assist students in successfully finding solutionsLearners share and defend solutions publicly in some manner” The process itself can be broken down into stages, or phases, that help teachers frame instruction. 4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers 1. Student-to-material. 2. 3. 4.

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/4-phases-inquiry-based-learning-guide-teachers/

Related:  Inquiry-Based LearningInquiry learningProject based/ inquiry learningCuriosity & Rigore-learning

Create a Culture of Questioning and Inquiry I have often suggested to teachers that when students have access to technology, whether it is provided by the school in a 1:1, BYOD, or simply the smart phone in their pocket, there should never be a question that goes unanswered –or un-followed. These are teachable moments for how to effectively search for information (information literacy & digital literacy) and allowing the time for students to explore connected ideas brings more depth to the learning, and allows students to make sense of things as they combine new information what they already know and understand, as well as to identify misunderstandings. Questioning leads to synthesis. It also makes the learning personal for students. What I discovered in the 300+ observations I have done for our 21 st Century Learning grant work was that the problem isn’t necessarily about allowing time for students to answer questions. Ask: “What do you wonder?”

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know - TeachThought The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know by Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed., radteach.com As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that doesn’t change. The human brain. But neuroscience isn’t exactly accessible to most educators, rarely published, and when it is, it’s often full of odd phrasing and intimidating jargon. Worse, there seems to be a disconnect between the dry science of neurology, and the need teachers have for relevant tools, resources, and strategies in the classroom.

Education Week Last week's question was: What are the Do's & Don'ts of Project-Based Learning? Few people know more about Project-Based Learning than Suzie Boss, and she graciously agreed to respond to this "question of the week." In addition, several readers left thoughtful comments. Striving for Higher-Order Thinking and Depth of Knowledge A little over a year ago, I read Higher-order thinking is the exception rather than the norm for most classrooms on Scott McLeod's blog, Dangerously Irrelevant, and have been mulling it over, wondering if our school district is any different. Over the past year, our teachers periodically collect data with their teams on the types of questions/tasks they ask students. One teacher records teacher questions and the other records student responses on a shared Google Doc; then teams sort through their own data, plotting teacher questions by Bloom's Revised Taxonomy, and student responses to those questions/tasks with Webb's Depth of Knowledge (DOK). The 2012-2013 data showed we were not very different from other districts; therefore, our teams set their own goals for higher-order thinking and depth of knowledge.

Why Inquiry Learning is Worth the Trouble Visualization of SLA principal Chris Lehmann's 2011 talk: guiding kids' to thinking about how they think. Nearly seven years after first opening its doors, the Science Leadership Academy public magnet high school* in Philadelphia and its inquiry-based approach to learning have become a national model for the kinds of reforms educators strive towards. But in a talk this past weekend at EduCon 2.5, the school’s sixth-annual conference devoted to sharing its story and spreading its techniques, Founding Principal Chris Lehmann insisted that replicating his schools approach required difficult tradeoffs. “This is not easy. This is not perfect,” Lehmann told a crowd of devotees stuffed inside one of the Center City school’s second-floor science classrooms on Sunday.

Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation What is inquiry-based learning? An old adage states: "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." The last part of this statement is the essence of inquiry-based learning, says our workshop author Joe Exline 1. Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding. Furthermore, involvement in learning implies possessing skills and attitudes that permit you to seek resolutions to questions and issues while you construct new knowledge.

Minds in Bloom: 72 Creative Ways for Students to Show What They Know As we all know, students already get plenty of tests, so why not let your students show what they learned creatively? Whether your students are reading independent books or your class has just finished a unit on space or pioneers, a culminating project can really cement that learning. Here are 72 fun and creative ways for your students to show what they know:Create a posterMake a PowerPoint PresentationDesign a modelMake a shoebox dioramaUse a three-panal display board Make a timelineCreate a board game incorporating key elements.

Want Better Project-Based Learning? Use Social and Emotional Learning Today's guest blogger is Thom Markham, a psychologist, educator, and president of Global Redesigns, an international consulting organization focused on project-based learning, social-emotional learning, youth development, and 21st-century school design. An unfortunate legacy of the cognitive model that dominates education is the belief that everything important in life takes place from the neck up. This belief is the primary reason that many teachers struggle with project-based learning (PBL). At its best, PBL taps into intangibles that make learning effortless and engaging: Drive, passion, purpose, and peak performance.

7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom 7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom by Barbara Blackburn, author of Rigor is not a 4-Letter Word Despite all the research, there are seven myths about rigor that are often heard. Let’s look at each, then turn our attention to the true meaning of rigor.

Is the Internet Really Making Me Stupid, Crazy, and Constantly Distracted? Okay, interesting questions indeed. Now, I am not an expert in neurology or anything, but I do have an MS in Biology and do know a little. Our brains have been shaped by millions of years of evolution. If you think your brain is going to get "wired" differently by using the internet, you are crazy. Inquiry-based learning Inquiry-based learning (also enquiry-based learning in British English)[1] starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge. The process is often assisted by a facilitator. Inquirers will identify and research issues and questions to develop their knowledge or solutions. Inquiry-based learning includes problem-based learning, and is generally used in small scale investigations and projects, as well as research.[2] History[edit] In the 1960s Joseph Schwab called for inquiry to be divided into four distinct levels.[10] This was later formalized by Marshall Herron in 1971, who developed the Herron Scale to evaluate the amount of inquiry within a particular lab exercise.[11] Since then, there have been a number of revisions proposed and inquiry can take various forms.

The thinking frames approach CPD Introduction There are 5 key sections to the Thinking Frames Approach; Setting the Question, Brainwave, See, Think/Sequence, Paragraph. The Approach is a sequence of teaching and learning interactions that encourage and scaffold the sequence of thinking skills and literacy skills that children need to form their own scientific explanations.

Building Parent Support for Project-Based Learning When a teacher, school or district tells parents, "We're going to do project-based learning," the response may vary. You're lucky if some say, "Great news! Students need to be taught differently these days!" But a more typical response might be: What's project-based learning?That's not how I was taught.

Related:  EDUCATION