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Intro to Inquiry Learning

Intro to Inquiry Learning
A (Somewhat) New Approach to Educating and Inspiring Kids Inquiry-based learning is not a new technique—in fact, it goes back to education philosopher John Dewey—but it does stand in contrast to the more structured, curriculum-centered framework of today's schools. Asking questions is at the heart of inquiry-based learning. The goal is not to ask just any questions, of course, but ones that kids honestly care about. Your role is to guide the kids in finding the answers themselves and encourage them to ask new questions along the way. Inquiry-based learning is a style particularly well-suited for out-of-school programs because they have a freer hand to complement, enhance, and expand on the work children are doing in their K-12 classes. This article explains some of the key principles of inquiry-based learning. Key Principles of Inquiry-Based Learning How is inquiry-based learning different from traditional approaches? In contrast, inquiry-based learning projects are driven by students.

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Inquiry into learning… Do you focus as much on the process of learning as the content? Do your students reflect as much on how they learn as on what they learn. As a PYP school, we have six units of inquiry each year, one under each of the following trans-disciplinary themes: Before exploring any other subject areas, we plan to start the coming school year at each grade level, with an inquiry (directly or indirectly) into learning. A unit that sets the tone for all the coming units. What is Inquiry Based Learning? How to Study Help students learn to study well. We offer a number of great resources. View Study Skills Graphic Organizers Great printable graphic organizers for all subjects and grade levels! inquiry learning & information literacy In a previous post, I described inquiry learning as comprising three elements: 1) questioning frameworks 2) information literacy / information seeking process 3) an action research cycle My conclusion was that these three elements define inquiry learning and separate it from related concepts such as information literacy.

What is Inquiry? Why Inquiry? Inquiry-based learning approaches when correctly implemented can help develop higher-order, information literacy and critical thinking skills. They can also develop problem-solving abilities and develop skills for lifelong learning. My experience has shown this approach to engage and motivate students. Students in my classes worked co-operatively and collaboratively to solve problems and I found the depth of understanding to be greater than with other teaching approaches. Teacher's Role

What is Inquiry-based Learning? We learn best when we are at the center of our own learning. Inquiry-based learning is a learning process through questions generated from the interests, curiosities, and perspectives/experiences of the learner. When investigations grow from our own questions, curiosities, and experiences, learning is an organic and motivating process that is intrinsically enjoyable. This trajectory depicts my theory that expands the inquiry-based learning model: If the question, investigation, and outcome(s) are truly meaningful to the learner, she or he will apply this newly-acquired knowledge in her or his own life by sharing knowledge and by taking concrete action in the world. My theory is informed by my own personal learning experiences and by my experiences in both formal and informal learning communities. I believe that it is this process that moves people out of inertia to take steps that create social change, or to push the boundaries of scientific knowledge and discovery.

What is Inquiry-Based Learning? Traditionally, classrooms in Ontario have followed the rote learning model, which is a technique based on repetition and memorization. But recently, those classrooms are disappearing in favour of a more collaborative space, in which teachers are facilitators using a technique called inquiry-based teaching. “Inquiry-based teaching is an approach to instruction that begins with exploring curriculum content and providing a framework for the students to ask their own questions which builds interest and curiosity,” says Louise Robitaille, an elementary teacher in Midland. Encouraging students to be active learners, posing their own questions and problems and following through on those, rather than passive learners simply receiving information is believed to create greater student engagement and, in turn, create greater student achievement.

The Cycle of Inquiry and Action: Essential Learning Communities Sidebars:The Cycle of InquiryKey to Teacher Inquiry: Framing the Question, Planning the ResearchWhat Counts as Data?Three Ways of Looking at a Colleague: Protocols for Peer ObservationReadings and Resourcs In a true learning community, inquiry becomes everybody's work. Inquiry Based Learning Effective inquiry is more than just asking questions. Inquiry-based learning is a complex process where students formulate questions, investigate to find answers, build new understandings, meanings and knowledge, and then communicate their learnings to others. In classrooms where teachers emphasize inquiry-based learning, students are actively involved in solving authentic (real-life) problems within the context of the curriculum and/or community. These powerful learning experiences engage students deeply. Research suggests that inquiry-based learning increases student creativity, independence, and problem solving skills, and it improves student achievement. A model for inquiry was developed by Alberta Education to support the work of teachers and students.

Inquiry What is Inquiry? Inquiry learning provides opportunities for students to experience and acquire processes through which they can gather information about the world. This requires a high level of interaction among the learner, the teacher, the area of study, available resources, and the learning environment. Teaching as inquiry / Teachers as learners: Inquiry / Case studies / Curriculum stories Overview | The focusing inquiry | The teaching inquiry | The learning inquiry | References If you cannot view or read this diagram select this link to open a text version >> Overview The New Zealand Curriculum (pages 34–35) and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa (pages 13–16) describe some of the teaching approaches that research shows to have a consistently positive impact on student learning. However, they stress that there is no formula that will work for every student in every situation.

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common: Learning focuses around a meaningful, ill-structured problem that demands consideration of diverse perspectivesAcademic content-learning occurs as a natural part of the process as students work towards finding solutionsLearners, working collaboratively, assume an active role in the learning processTeachers provide learners with learning supports and rich multiple media sources of information to assist students in successfully finding solutionsLearners share and defend solutions publicly in some manner” The process itself can be broken down into stages, or phases, that help teachers frame instruction. 4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers 1.

What is IBL? - The Academy of Inquiry Based Learning Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is a student-centered method of teaching Mathematics. At the college mathematics level one of the forms of IBL is the Modified Moore Method, named after R. L. teachingresources - Instructional Strategies Introduction An instructional strategy is a method you would use in your teaching (in the classroom, online, or in some other medium) to help activate students' curiosity about a class topic, to engage the students in learning, to probe critical thinking skills, to keep them on task, to engender sustained and useful classroom interaction, and, in general, to enable and enhance their learning of course content. The goal of an IS is to enable learning, to motivate the learners, to engage them in learning, to help them focus.

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