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Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation

Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation
What is inquiry-based learning? An old adage states: "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." The last part of this statement is the essence of inquiry-based learning, says our workshop author Joe Exline 1. Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding. "Inquiry" is defined as "a seeking for truth, information, or knowledge -- seeking information by questioning." A Context for Inquiry Unfortunately, our traditional educational system has worked in a way that discourages the natural process of inquiry. Some of the discouragement of our natural inquiry process may come from a lack of understanding about the deeper nature of inquiry-based learning. Importance of Inquiry Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today's world. Through the process of inquiry, individuals construct much of their understanding of the natural and human-designed worlds. Inquiry is important in the generation and transmission of knowledge. Related:  Inquiry-Based Learning

Inquiry-based learning Inquiry-based learning (also enquiry-based learning in British English)[1] starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge. The process is often assisted by a facilitator. Inquirers will identify and research issues and questions to develop their knowledge or solutions. Inquiry-based learning includes problem-based learning, and is generally used in small scale investigations and projects, as well as research.[2] History[edit] In the 1960s Joseph Schwab called for inquiry to be divided into four distinct levels.[10] This was later formalized by Marshall Herron in 1971, who developed the Herron Scale to evaluate the amount of inquiry within a particular lab exercise.[11] Since then, there have been a number of revisions proposed and inquiry can take various forms. Characteristics of Inquiry-Based Learning[edit] Specific learning processes that people engage in during inquiry-learning include:[13] 1.

Teachers Telling Tales | History Today Richard Kennett calls on his fellow history teachers to embrace narrative. There is no better way to inspire the historians of the future. The Bayeux Tapestry is both a rich source and a riveting account of the events of 1066If you have read anything about the proposed new English and Welsh history curriculum you will have noticed that, according to politicians, academics and journalists, school history teachers do not teach facts. We avoid knowledge as if it were the plague. Dates, names and statistics repulse us. All we do is teach – and critics utter the next word as if it were an obscenity – ‘skills’. Yet all this is far from the truth. However, in my experience the one thing that history teachers – and I point my finger at the secondary sector – are scared of is storytelling and this seems a deep shame. History is the story of the past. Yet narrative at school is often a dirty word. Primarily it can have a huge effect on engagement.

INQUIRY-BASED LEARNING - About Us What is Inquiry-based Learning? We learn best when we are at the center of our own learning. Inquiry-based learning is a learning process through questions generated from the interests, curiosities, and perspectives/experiences of the learner. When investigations grow from our own questions, curiosities, and experiences, learning is an organic and motivating process that is intrinsically enjoyable. This trajectory depicts my theory that expands the inquiry-based learning model: If the question, investigation, and outcome(s) are truly meaningful to the learner, she or he will apply this newly-acquired knowledge in her or his own life by sharing knowledge and by taking concrete action in the world. Expanding this process beyond the self can have profoundly positive social implications globally. Paula Learn more about the guiding principles that inform my work.

The Academy of Inquiry Based Learning AEC394/WC075: What Is Inquiry-Based Instruction? Anna J. Warner and Brian E. Myers2 Introduction Educators should constantly evaluate and adjust their teaching approaches to meet the educational needs of their students and society. What is Inquiry-Based Teaching? Inquiry-based teaching is a teaching method that combines the curiosity of students and the scientific method to enhance the development of critical thinking skills while learning science. Students engage in five activities when they engage in inquiry learning and use the scientific method, as noted in the National Science Education Standards published by the National Academy of Sciences. Figure 1. Tasks of Inquiry Credit: Carin, Bass, & Contant, 2005, p. 21 [Click thumbnail to enlarge.] According to the National Academy of Sciences (1995), when students learn through inquiry, they: question;investigate;use evidence to describe, explain, and predict;connect evidence to knowledge; and share findings. Each of these factors can be found in the following example. Example 1 Example U.S.

Lessons & Activities Thinking about Lesson Plans The most effective technology integration lessons put students at the center of the learning process. These lessons empower students by fostering creativity and innovation and they enhance collaboration and communication. Look for lesson plans that help build 21st century skills such as inventive thinking, communication and collaboration, and information literacy. There are great lesson plan resources available online that help build 21st century skills. It is often helpful to review the lessons created and use them as a building block to develop personalized lessons for your classroom and students. A Vision of K-12 Students Today, created by Professor Michael Wesch at Kansas State University Instead of focusing on "canned" lesson plans, concentrate on finding "lesson ideas" that can be adopted and integrated into your lesson objectives. Best Sites for History Lesson Plans and Activities National Archives: DocsTeach Using DocsTeach from the U.S. Mr. Registration

TWT: Inquiry-based Learning Strategy What is Inquiry-based learning? The old adage, “Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand” describes the core of inquiry-based learning. Inquiry is the process of seeking truth, information, or knowledge by questioning. Questioning! The process of inquiring begins with gathering information and data through applying the human senses: seeing, hearing, touching, tasting, and smelling. Inquiry-based learning processes vary. How does inquiry-based learning encourage student learning? Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today’s world. What does inquiry-based learning look like in the classroom? The following example elaborates on the five steps listed above: questioning, planning and predicting, investigating, recording and reporting, and reflecting. Additional Information on the Five Steps for Inquiry-based Learning Questioning, Planning and Predicting, Investigating, Recording and Reporting, and Reflecting.

Resources Useful Sites and Articles I have developed two new companion sites: Web Resources For Inquiry and Apps for Inquiry (Android and i-pad apps) Inquiry-based Learning Galileo Foundation - Sharon Friesen and Pat Clifford. The Inquiry Page for info and examples of inquiry. Top of page Resources for Inquiry Top 100 Tools for educators - Ranks 100 ICT tools many of which are free. ng Co.) Graphic Organisers See the Graphic Organisers page Child-friendly Search Engines See the search engines page Useful Sites Inquiry with Technology - My paper on the Opoutere School Digiops project. Student Sites There are large numbers of child-friendly sites on the web, these are a few of my favourites. Iknowthat.com - My all-time favourite site for all topics, not just inquiry. Webquests Dinosaur for a Pet webquest - My dinosaur webquest - I used this with a year 2 - 5 class. Jan-Marie Kellow 2013This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

May and Mahavier methods - CAPABLE: Calculus Acquisition through Problem and Activity Based Learning Here are two methods that I (Amy Ksir) know of for turning any course into an inquiry-based course. The first method I learned from E. Lee May, and so I am calling it the May method. I am trying it in Calculus I, Fall 2009. You use the regular textbook and follow the syllabus. But instead of lecturing on the material, you just assign the problems. The other method I have not tried, but have heard Ted Mahavier describe it several times. What is IBL? - The Academy of Inquiry Based Learning Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is a student-centered method of teaching Mathematics. At the college mathematics level one of the forms of IBL is the Modified Moore Method, named after R. L. Moore. Boiled down to its essence IBL is a teaching method that engages students in sense-making activities. E. Inquiry-based learning (IBL) is a method of instruction that places the student, the subject, and their interaction at the center of the learning experience. A typical day in an IBL math course is hard to define, due to the variance across the environments and needs at institutions across the nation and world.

Let’s Shake Up the Social Sciences In contrast, the social sciences have stagnated. They offer essentially the same set of academic departments and disciplines that they have for nearly 100 years: sociology, economics, anthropology, psychology and political science. This is not only boring but also counterproductive, constraining engagement with the scientific cutting edge and stifling the creation of new and useful knowledge. One reason citizens, politicians and university donors sometimes lack confidence in the social sciences is that social scientists too often miss the chance to declare victory and move on to new frontiers. I’m not suggesting that social scientists stop teaching and investigating classic topics like monopoly power, racial profiling and health inequality. Such interdisciplinary efforts are also generating practical insights about fundamental problems like chronic illness, energy conservation, pandemic disease, intergenerational poverty and market panics.

16 Great Educational Web Tools and Apps for Inquiry-based Learning February, 2016As a learning strategy, inquiry-based learning is all about learners constructing their own understanding and knowledge through asking questions. Unlike traditional learning methods that focus primarily on drills, memorization and rote learning, inquiry-based learning is essentially student-centered. It starts with posing questions and directly involves students in challenging hands-on activities that drive students to ask more questions and explore different learning paths. In today’s post, we have assembled a collection of some useful web tools and apps that support the ethos of inquiry-based learning. Web Tools VideoNotes is a free web tool that allows students to take notes on a video they are watching. Edpuzzle allows you to use only what you need from any video, insert audio notes or record over a video with your voice, and add questions at any point in the video .3- PixiClip 6- Hints about Print 8- YouTube Video Editor iPad Apps 2- Penultimate 4- Haiku Deck 5- Tellagami

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