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A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories

A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories
Do you know the actual theories of learning? A learning theory is an attempt to describe how people learn, helping us understand this inherently complex process. There’s sub-levels of each theory, behavior and other categories … it’s complex. But it’s worth understanding. This helpful infographic does a solid job of breaking down the basics of learning theories in a visual and understandable format. I personally enjoy the part about connectivism in the digital age.

http://www.edudemic.com/a-simple-guide-to-4-complex-learning-theories/

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Constructivism and the Student-Centered Approach "When you make the finding yourself — even if you’re the last person on Earth to see the light — you’ll never forget it." The terms "guide on the side" and "sage on the stage" describe two distinct educational models. Student-Centered Approach It is helpful to look critically at both teacher-centered and student-centered courses to see which technique might be worth adapting and which may not work for your course. Student-centered courses focus on the learner rather than the teacher. Student-centered teaching is based on the constructivist model in which students construct rather than receive or assimilate knowledge.

Classical Conditioning 1903 - Ivan Pavlov discovers Classical Conditioning Theory, while conducting research on the digestive system of dogs. Later classical conditioning theory was applied to humans by John B. Watson. Check the Instructional Design Models and Theories: Classical Conditioning article and presentation to find more. Creativity Becomes an Academic Discipline Photo IT BOTHERS MATTHEW LAHUE and it surely bothers you: enter a public restroom and the stall lock is broken. Fortunately, Mr. Lahue has a solution.

Ofsted 2012: Questioning to promote learning — From Good to Outstanding: Helping you to achieve outstanding and creative teaching and learning. Have you ever noticed that often, when someone is being interviewed, they say “That’s a good question.”? It’s usually when it’s a question they can’t answer quickly and easily. Indeed, “good” questions are ones that generally need thinking about. Inspectors must consider whether: Education, the Brain and Common Core State Standards Understanding even the basics of how the brain learns -- how people perceive, process and remember information -- can help teachers and students successfully meet the requirements of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). This initiative aims to establish a relatively standardized knowledge base among all students, alleviating the background knowledge gap. It's designed to promote critical, divergent thinking, equipping students with information relevant to the real world and the ability to use it. Sounds great. But what does that really mean, in practice, for teachers?

Constructivism (philosophy of education) Jean Piaget: founder of Constructivism In past centuries, constructivist ideas were not widely valued due to the perception that children's play was seen as aimless and of little importance. Jean Piaget did not agree with these traditional views, however. The ADDIE Instructional Design Model Infographic Instructional Design Infographics The ADDIE Instructional Design Model Infographic The ADDIE instructional design model is possibly the best-known instructional design model. The ADDIE model refers to Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate. Furthermore, provides a step-by-step process that helps instructional designers plan and create training programs with a framework in order to make sure that their instructional products are effective and that their processes are as efficient as they can possibly be. Analyze In the analysis phase, the instructional problem is clarified, the instructional goals and objectives are established, and the learning environment and learner’s existing knowledge and skills are identified.

edutopia Most educators have little choice about the (usually) over-crowded, (often) unappealing rooms they teach in -- but they intuitively know that the spaces children spend their time in can have an effect on how they learn. I've gathered a collection of videos to explore the questions: How important is environment to learning? And what small changes can you make in seating, organization, lighting, and decor to build your own space into a better place to teach and learn? Video Playlist: Innovative Learning Spaces Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube. Flexible Learning Environments (04:02) Students and teachers at Eanes Independent School District in Austin, Texas, talk about the district's experiment with creating classrooms of the future to foster 21st-century skills at all grade levels.

Knowing Our Students as Learners Today, research and experience in increasingly global classrooms are revealing the complex interplay of factors that influence a student's learning. Educators understand that the business of coming to know our students as learners is simply too important to leave to chance—and that the peril of not undertaking this inquiry is not reaching a learner at all. The story of our friend Arthur is a reminder of the consequences of ignoring a student's unique learning circumstances. Arthur: Dropping in from Another Planet Arthur was born in the Dutch West Indies, now Indonesia, and had just seen his sixth birthday when the Japanese invaded.

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