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Minimum viable product

Minimum viable product
In product development, the minimum viable product (MVP) is a strategy used for fast and quantitative market testing of a product or product feature. The term was coined by Frank Robinson and popularized by Eric Ries for web applications.[1][2] It may also involve carrying out market analysis beforehand. Description[edit] A minimum viable product has just those core features that allow the product to be deployed, and no more. The product is typically deployed to a subset of possible customers, such as early adopters that are thought to be more forgiving, more likely to give feedback, and able to grasp a product vision from an early prototype or marketing information. It is a strategy targeted at avoiding building products that customers do not want, that seeks to maximize the information learned about the customer per dollar spent. An MVP is not a minimal product,[3] it is a strategy and process directed toward making and selling a product to customers. Techniques[edit] See also[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimum_viable_product

Related:  Theories of Innovation

Cycle of Diffusion of innovations - Everett M. Rogers Model Everett M. Rogers is widely known as the inventor of the “Diffusion of Innovation” theory from his research on how farmers adopt agricultural innovations. After pursuing a degree in agriculture, Rogers earned his PhD in Sociology and Statistics at Iowa State University (1957). His doctorate work stemmed from both his personal interest in understanding why farmers in Iowa, including his father, resisted using such new inventions in their fields as high-yielding hybrid seed corns, chemical fertilizers and weed sprays as well as how such new applications diffuse among farmers over time. Rogers reviewed the existing studies on diffusion of innovations from educational, medical and marketing domains and found considerable similarities among these different disciplines. His book, Diffusion of Innovations (1962), gave him academic fame and still remains the second most cited book title in social sciences today.

Startup company Evolution of a startup company[edit] Startup companies can come in all forms and sizes. A critical task in setting up a business is to conduct research in order to validate, assess and develop the ideas or business concepts in addition to opportunities to establish further and deeper understanding on the ideas or business concepts as well as their commercial potential.

Agile Product Ownership in a nutshell This is basically a 1 day product ownership course compressed into a 15 minute animated presentation. There’s obviously more to product ownership than this, so see this is a high level summary. Here’s the complete drawing (.png format)Here’s a downloadable version of the video, in case you don’t want to stream (.mov format, 90 Mb) Special thanks to Alistair Cockburn, Tom & Mary Poppendieck, Jeff Patton, Ron Jeffries, Jeff Sutherland, and Michael Dubakov for providing many of the models, metaphors, and ideas that I use in this presentation.

Angel investor An angel Investor or angel (also known as a business angel or informal investor) is an affluent individual who provides capital for a business start-up, usually in exchange for convertible debt or ownership equity. A small but increasing number of angel investors organize themselves into angel groups or angel networks to share research and pool their investment capital, as well as to provide advice to their portfolio companies.[1] Etymology and origin[edit] The term "angel" originally comes from Broadway, where it was used to describe wealthy individuals who provided money for theatrical productions. In 1978, William Wetzel,[2] then a professor at the University of New Hampshire and founder of its Center for Venture Research, completed a pioneering study on how entrepreneurs raised seed capital in the USA, and he began using the term "angel" to describe the investors that supported them. Source and extent of funding[edit]

Freemium In freemium business model, business tiers start with a "free" tier Freemium is a pricing strategy by which a product or service (typically a digital offering such as software, media, games or web services) is provided free of charge, but money (premium) is charged for proprietary features, functionality, or virtual goods.[1][2] The word "freemium" is a portmanteau neologism combining the two aspects of the business model: "free" and "premium". Origin[edit] Give your service away for free, possibly ad supported but maybe not, acquire a lot of customers very efficiently through word of mouth, referral networks, organic search marketing, etc., then offer premium priced value added services or an enhanced version of your service to your customer base. Jarid Lukin of Alacra then suggested the term "freemium" for this model.[3]

Innoveracy: Misunderstanding Innovation Illiteracy is the inability to read and write. Though the percent of sufferers has halved in the last 35 years, currently 15% of the world has this affliction. Innumeracy is the inability to apply simple numerical concepts. The rate of innumeracy is unknown but chances are that it affects over 50% of us. This tragedy impedes our ability to have a discourse on matters related to quantitative judgement while policy decisions increasingly depend on this judgement. .NET .NET Framework (pronounced dot net) is a software framework developed by Microsoft that runs primarily on Microsoft Windows. It includes a large library and provides language interoperability (each language can use code written in other languages) across several programming languages. Programs written for .NET Framework execute in a software environment (as contrasted to hardware environment), known as the Common Language Runtime (CLR), an application virtual machine that provides services such as security, memory management, and exception handling.

Innovation 101 Our highly interactive courses feature hours of personalized practice and coaching, with individual and group exercises, group simulation, excursions and practice interviews. An extensive set of training materials is provided to facilitate learning and serves as a reference when participants take what they have learned back to their own places of work. Take home tools and materials you can apply directly to your innovation program. Training is preferably an integral part of projects with client teams.

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