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Appreciative Inquiry - Problem Solving from MindTools

Appreciative Inquiry - Problem Solving from MindTools
Solving Problems by Looking at What's Going Right © iStockphoto/Yuri_Accurs Imagine that your organization's order book is full, and you're desperate to expand your business – but you just can't find the staff you need. What's worse, cash is tight, your recruitment budget is stretched to breaking point, and you strongly suspect that some of the approaches you're using just aren't working. One approach here is to focus on the things that aren't working, and think about how you can fix them. Another approach is to shift to a positive perspective, look at the things that are working, and build on them. This is the premise behind "Appreciative Inquiry", a method of problem solving that was pioneered by David Cooperrider of Case Western Reserve University in the mid 1980s. To understand the basis of Appreciative Inquiry it is useful to look at the meaning of the two words in context. Appreciation means to recognize and value the contributions or attributes of things and people around us. Tip 1: Related:  Underpinning Theories

Appreciative Inquiry - What is Appreciative Inquiry? What is Appreciative Inquiry? - The Appreciative Inquiry Commons from A Positive Revolution in Change: Appreciative Inquiry by David L. Cooperrider and Diana Whitney. Ap-pre’ci-ate, v., 1. valuing; the act of recognizing the best in people or the world around us; affirming past and present strengths, successes, and potentials; to perceive those things that give life (health, vitality, excellence) to living systems 2. to increase in value, e.g. the economy has appreciated in value. Synonyms: VALUING, PRIZING, ESTEEMING, and HONORING.In-quire’ (kwir), v., 1. the act of exploration and discovery. 2. Appreciative Inquiry is about the coevolutionary search for the best in people, their organizations, and the relevant world around them. Read the complete excerpt from A Positive Revolution in Change: Appreciative Inquiry by David L. For more definitions and explanations of Appreciative Inquiry click here.

Theories of Motivation Author: Jim Riley Last updated: Sunday 23 September, 2012 There are a number of different views as to what motivates workers. The most commonly held views or theories are discussed below and have been developed over the last 100 years or so. Unfortunately these theories do not all reach the same conclusions! Taylor Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856 – 1917) put forward the idea that workers are motivated mainly by pay. Workers do not naturally enjoy work and so need close supervision and control Therefore managers should break down production into a series of small tasks Workers should then be given appropriate training and tools so they can work as efficiently as possible on one set task. Workers are then paid according to the number of items they produce in a set period of time- piece-rate pay. As a result workers are encouraged to work hard and maximise their productivity. Mayo Mayo conducted a series of experiments at the Hawthorne factory of the Western Electric Company in Chicago Maslow

employee motivation, motivational and inspirational quotes for sales and business staff home » leadership/management » motivational theory employee motivation theory - team building activities, workshops, inspirational quotes, and the power of positive experience Alignment of aims, purpose and values between staff, teams and organization is the most fundamental aspect of motivation. The better the alignment and personal association with organizational aims, the better the platform for motivation. Where people find it difficult to align and associate with the organizational aims, then most motivational ideas and activities will have a reduced level of success. Motivation is a complex area. Erik Erikson's life stage theory is useful for understanding people's different motivational needs according to life stage. Nudge theory is a powerful change-management concept which emerged in the early 2000s. Motivational receptiveness and potential in everyone changes from day to day, from situation to situation. ice-breakers and warm-ups for motivation building confidence for motivation

Theories of Motivation - Major Theories of Motivation Motivation is the force that initiates, guides and maintains goal-oriented behaviors. It is what causes us to take action, whether to grab a snack to reduce hunger or enroll in college to earn a degree. The forces that lie beneath motivation can be biological, social, emotional or cognitive in nature. Researchers have developed a number of different theories to explain motivation. Instinct Theory of Motivation According to instinct theories, people are motivated to behave in certain ways because they are evolutionarily programmed to do so. William James created a list of human instincts that included such things as attachment, play, shame, anger, fear, shyness, modesty and love. Incentive Theory of Motivation The incentive theory suggests that people are motivated to do things because of external rewards. Drive Theory of Motivation Arousal Theory of Motivation The arousal theory of motivation suggests that people take certain actions to either decrease or increase levels of arousal.

Motivation Theory frederick herzberg motivational theory, motivators and hygiene factors, free herzberg diagrams home » leadership/management » frederick herzberg motivational theory Frederick Herzberg's motivation and hygiene factors Frederick Herzberg (1923-2000), clinical psychologist and pioneer of 'job enrichment', is regarded as one of the great original thinkers in management and motivational theory. Frederick I Herzberg was born in Massachusetts on April 18, 1923. His undergraduate work was at the City College of New York, followed by graduate degrees at the University of Pittsburgh. Herzberg was later Professor of Management at Case Western Reserve University, where he established the Department of Industrial Mental Health. Frederick Herzberg's book 'The Motivation to Work', written with research colleagues Bernard Mausner and Barbara Bloch Snyderman in 1959, first established his theories about motivation in the workplace. Significantly, Herzberg commented in 1984, twenty-five years after his theory was first published: herzberg's main theory and its significance N.B. see also

Employee motivation. Motivation in the workplace- theory and practice Employee motivation, the organizational environment and productivity The job of a manager in the workplace is to get things done through employees. To do this the manager should be able to motivate employees. In spite of enormous research, basic as well as applied, the subject of motivation is not clearly understood and more often than not poorly practiced. Human nature can be very simple, yet very complex too. These articles on motivation theory and practice concentrate on various theories regarding human nature in general and motivation in particular. Why study and apply employee motivation principles? Quite apart from the benefit and moral value of an altruistic approach to treating colleagues as human beings and respecting human dignity in all its forms, research and observations show that well motivated employees are more productive and creative. Motivation is the key to performance improvement Are they born with the self-motivation or drive? Job performance =f(ability)(motivation)

Positive psychology To Martin Seligman, psychology (particularly its positive branch) can investigate and promote realistic ways of fostering more joy in individuals and communities. Positive psychology is a recent branch of psychology whose purpose was summed up in 1998 by Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: "We believe that a psychology of positive human functioning will arise, which achieves a scientific understanding and effective interventions to build thriving individuals, families, and communities."[1] Positive psychologists seek "to find and nurture genius and talent" and "to make normal life more fulfilling",[2] rather than merely treating mental illness. Positive psychology is primarily concerned with using the psychological theory, research and intervention techniques to understand the positive, adaptive, creative and emotionally fulfilling aspects of human behavior.[3] Overview[edit] Research from this branch of psychology has seen various practical applications. The goal[edit]

Positive Psychology Center Why do some people enjoy life and others don't? | Society Propose a movement whose aim is to bottle happiness so it can be dispensed to one and all, saving humanity from a future of chronic misery, and you might expect at least a few people to roll their eyes. But, starting tomorrow, Britain's most prestigious scientific institution, the Royal Society, will host a meeting for some of the world's top psychologists who have done just that. Over two days, they will discuss "the science of wellbeing". Their aim is to find out why it is that some people's lives go so right. What is it that makes them happy and fulfilled, while others seem doomed to founder in misery, dissatisfaction and dejection? As the psychologists converge on London, some, though dutifully upbeat, admit that the public could be forgiven for getting the wrong idea about the meeting. For the record, Baylis defines wellbeing as a state that allows someone to thrive and flourish. "What we've found is that if someone is happy with life, they are more popular.

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