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Peter Joseph

Peter Joseph
Peter Joseph[1] (born 1979) is an American independent filmmaker and social activist. He has written, directed, narrated, scored, and produced three documentary films called Zeitgeist: The Movie (2007), Zeitgeist: Addendum (2008), and Zeitgeist: Moving Forward (2011). He is the founder of the Zeitgeist Movement and on the steering committee of Project Peace on Earth.[3] Joseph also writes and produces the web series Culture in Decline.[4] In 2013 he directed the Black Sabbath music video "God Is Dead?" Media attention "God is Dead?" Peter Joseph directed a "short-film" music video for the heavy metal music group Black Sabbath, entitled "God Is Dead?" See also References External links Related:  Conspiracy Theories

Zeitgeist: The Movie Zeitgeist: The Movie is a 2007 documentary-style film by Peter Joseph. It presents a number of conspiracy theory-based ideas, such as the Christ myth theory, conspiracy theories about the 9/11 attacks in 2001, and argues that bankers manipulate the media and international monetary system.[citation needed] Released online on June 18, 2007, at zeitgeistmovie.com, it became popular among conspiracy theorists.[1][2][3] Some critics have questioned the accuracy of its claims and the quality of its arguments, describing it as "agitprop" and "propaganda Production history[edit] Zeitgeist: The Movie originated as an art project. Synopsis[edit] Horusleft and Jesus right, both presented in the film as "solar messiahs." The film opens with animated abstract visualizations, film and stock footage, a cartoon and audio quotes about spirituality by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, followed by clips of war, explosions, and the September 11 attacks. Part I: The Greatest Story Ever Told[edit] Reception[edit]

Jacque Fresco Fresco writes and lectures his views on sustainable cities, energy efficiency, natural-resource management, cybernetic technology, automation, and the role of science in society. Fresco directs The Venus Project.[3] Fresco advocates global implementation of a socioeconomic system which he refers to as a "resource-based economy."[4][5] Early life Born March 13, 1916,[6] Jacque Fresco grew up in a Sephardi Jewish[7] home in Bensonhurst in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.[8]Fresco grew up during the Great Depression period. Fresco spent time with friends discussing Darwin, Einstein, science, and the future.[9] Fresco attended the Young Communist League. Career Aircraft Industry Fresco worked at Douglas Aircraft Company in California during the late 1930s.[10][11] Fresco presented designs including a flying wing[12] and a disk-shaped aircraft. Trend Home Fresco was commissioned by Earl Muntz, to design housing that was low cost. Scientific Research Laboratories Midlife Looking Forward Works

Jordan Maxwell's Home Page The Venus Project Jordan Maxwell Jordan Maxwell (28 de diciembre de 1940) es un investigador y escritor estadounidense especializado en teología, sociedades secretas, etimología y ufología. Sus trabajos sobre sociedades secretas, tanto antiguas como modernas, y sus símbolos, han fascinado audiencias alrededor del mundo por décadas. Es considerado uno de los grandes nombres en el mundo de las teorías conspirativas.[1] Trabajos[editar] 2]Jordan Maxwell Opinion Granting Default Judgment: [link to www.ftc.gov] 3]Jordan Maxwell defraud the Trurth Seeker Company of cool $ 120000.00 [link to archive.org] Temas[editar] Los temas de interés de Jordan Maxwell incluyen: Astro-Teología.Símbolos antiguos y emblemas ocultos.Las sociedades secretas y su influencia en los eventos mundiales.Simbolismo sexual en las religiones del mundo.Misterios del mundo: antiguos y modernos.El Sol en la historia de la política y la religión.Ciencias y tecnología antigua.Fundaciones para la religión moderna. Zeitgeist[editar] Enlaces externos[editar]

Zeitgeist: Moving Forward David Icke David Vaughan Icke (/aɪk/; IKE, born 29 April 1952) is an English writer, public speaker and former professional footballer. He promotes conspiracy theories about global politics and has written extensively about them. He nevertheless continued to develop his ideas, and in four books published over seven years – The Robots' Rebellion (1994), And the Truth Shall Set You Free (1995), The Biggest Secret (1999), and Children of the Matrix (2001) – set out a worldview that combined New-Age spiritualism with a denunciation of totalitarian trends in the modern world. Michael Barkun has described Icke's position as "New Age conspiracism," writing that he is the most fluent of the conspiracist genre. Biography[edit] Early life and education[edit] Icke was born in Leicester General Hospital to Beric Vaughan Icke and Barbara J. After the war, Beric became a clerk in the Gents' clock factory, and the family lived in a terraced house on Lead Street, near Wharf Street in the centre of Leicester.

The Zeitgeist Movement Adam Kokesh Adam Charles Kokesh (born February 1, 1982) is an American libertarian talk show host and activist. A decorated veteran of the War in Iraq, he came to disparage war and advocate nonviolent resistance to power. Variously identifying as anarchist, agorist, voluntaryist, Kokesh has called for a "new American revolution" for the "orderly dissolution of the federal government Personal background[edit] Kokesh was born on February 1, 1982, in San Francisco, California.[5] He is the son of Charles Kokesh, a Santa Fe businessman and former owner of the defunct Santa Fe Horse Park.[6][7] According to a 2013 article in The Santa Fe New Mexican, Charles Kokesh (Adam's father) was indicted for violating the Endangered Species Act and has been charged with a $45 million investor fraud.[8] Kokesh attended the Native American Preparatory School in San Ysidro, New Mexico,[9] and he received a bachelor's degree in psychology from Claremont McKenna College. Marine Corps service[edit] Activism[edit] 2007[edit]

Zeitgeist: The Movie Oklahoma City bombing The Oklahoma City bombing was a domestic terrorist bomb attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995. It remained the most destructive act of terrorism committed in the United States until the September 11 attacks of 2001. The bombing killed 168 people[1] and injured more than 680 others.[2] The blast destroyed or damaged 324 buildings within a 16-block radius, destroyed or burned 86 cars, and shattered glass in 258 nearby buildings,[3][4] causing at least an estimated $652 million worth of damage.[5] Extensive rescue efforts were undertaken by local, state, federal, and worldwide agencies in the wake of the bombing, and substantial donations were received from across the country. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) activated eleven of its Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces, consisting of 665 rescue workers who assisted in rescue and recovery operations.[6][7] Planning[edit] Motivation[edit] Target selection[edit] Alfred P.

Interreflections I

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