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Foraging: 52 Wild Plants You Can Eat

Foraging: 52 Wild Plants You Can Eat
Here are a few common North American goodies that are safe to eat if you find yourself stuck in the wild: Blackberries: Many wild berries are not safe to eat, it’s best to stay away from them. But wild blackberries are 100% safe to eat and easy to recognize. They have red branches that have long thorns similar to a rose, the green leaves are wide and jagged. They are best to find in the spring when their white flowers bloom, they are clustered all around the bush and their flowers have 5 points. Dandelions: The easiest to recognize is the dandelion, in the spring they show their bright yellow buds. Asparagus: The vegetable that makes your pee smell funny grows in the wild in most of Europe and parts of North Africa, West Asia, and North America. Elderberries: An elderberry shrub can grow easily grow about 10 feet and yield tons of food, their leaf structure is usually 7 main leaves on a long stretched out stem, the leaves are long and round and the leaves themselves have jagged edges. Pine:

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Eucalyptus citriodora Lemon-Scented Gum PFAF Plant Database Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally. Antibacterial; Astringent. Eucalyptus leaves are a traditional Aboriginal herbal remedy. The essential oil found in the leaves is a powerful antiseptic and is used all over the world for relieving coughs and colds, sore throats and other infections[254]. HOW TO PROPAGATE THE SAFFRON CROCUS Although found in the bulb section of most plant retailers come autumn, the saffron crocus actually grows from compressed underground stems known as corms. These specialised stems come complete with dormant buds, each one capable of growing into a genetically identical plant. Each year one new corm will grow on top of the old one, together with some smaller ones which will grow from the base of the plant. These smaller juvenile corms are known as cormels.

» Honey Heals The Wounded By HoneyColony Staff It’s an ancient story. Pedanius Dioscorides (circa 40—90 AD) was the rock star of his day. His five-book volume, De Materia Medica (“Regarding Medical Materials”), was not only a big hit throughout the Roman and Greek empires, widely read for over a millennium, but it also formed the cornerstone of modern pharmacopoeia. A key ingredient: honey. A botanist and physician who served as an army surgeon for the Emperor Nero, the traveling Dioscorides discovered a range of medicinal plants and roots. What is the universal edibility test?" G­etting lost or stranded in the wilderness is serious business, and ­you need to make sound decisions to give yourself the best chance at survival. It also helps to know some basic wilderness survival skills. To make sure you're safe from the elements, you'll need to know how to build a shelter. To provide you with an opportunity to cook food, boil water and send a rescue signal, you should learn how to build a fire without a match or lighter.

Survival Food Series: Medicinal Plants for the Survival Garden Plants have been revered through out history for their magical healing powers. In a dire situation where over the counter medicine is no longer available, many will be forced to turn their backs on modern medicine and reacquaint themselves with more homeopathic and natural forms. In this type of situation, many will be turning to alternative medicines to alleviate and assist some of the more chronic health issues such as high blood pressure, menopausal symptoms, migraines, anemia and arthritis. Acquiring books on herbal medicines for a disaster scenario would be a great knowledge source to add to any preparedness library. In the book, Herbal Medicine: The Natural Way To Get Well and Stay Well by Dian Dincin Buchman, Ph.

NSBM Applications, Handouts, Syllabus - Northeast Herbal School of Botanical Medicine Below are ths school application, resource lists for incoming students, a number of handouts and other information. Feel free to download any and all. Some of these handouts are occasionally revised. Self-Seeding Crops You’ll Never Need to Replant One of the characteristics of a truly sustainable garden is that it produces at least some of its own seed. This is most often done when gardeners select, harvest and store seeds until the proper time for planting the following year. But some self-seeding crops produce seeds so readily that as long as you give them time to flower and mature, and set seed, you will always have free plants growing in your garden. You can simply let the seeds fall where they are, or toss pieces of the seed heads into the corners of your garden, or whichever area you want them in — no harvesting, storing or replanting required. With most self-seeding vegetables, herbs and annual flowers, you’ll just need to learn to recognize the seedlings so you don’t hoe them down.

Tree growth never slows Richard Schultz/Corbis Trees — including California's giant redwoods — add an increasing amount of mass every year. Many foresters have long assumed that trees gradually lose their vigour as they mature, but a new analysis suggests that the larger a tree gets, the more kilos of carbon it puts on each year. “The trees that are adding the most mass are the biggest ones, and that holds pretty much everywhere on Earth that we looked,” says Nathan Stephenson, an ecologist at the US Geological Survey in Three Rivers, California, and the first author of the study, which appears today in Nature1. “Trees have the equivalent of an adolescent growth spurt, but it just keeps going.” The scientific literature is chock-full of studies that focus on forests' initial growth and their gradual move towards a plateau in the amount of carbon they store as they reach maturity2.

Why Eat Wild Herbs and Edible Plants? The Benefits of Wild Edible Plants For hundreds of years people took advantage of the medicine cabinet at their doorstep. Before the advent of processed foods and modern convenience stores, wild plants were a common dietary supplement. They were the ultimate natural multivitamin! Traditional Plant Foods of canadian indigenous peoples, Nutrition, Botany and Use Almost all major groups of wild plants in Canada have edible members that are reported to have been used by Indigenous People. Exceptions are the Bryophytes (Mosses and Liverworts), which were not eaten—as far as can be determined in the literature. Any literature reports of "moss" being eaten seem actually to refer to lichen species. Slime molds, too, have no evidence of having been used as food. In this section plant foods listed alphabetically by scientific name within their major taxonomic categories: ALGAE (Seaweeds); LICHENS; FUNGI (including Mushrooms); PTERIDOPHYTES (Ferns and Fern-allies); GYMNOSPERMS (Conifers and Conifer-allies); and ANGIOSPERMS (Flowering Plants, both Monocotyledons and Dicotyledons).

Adaptogenic Herbs For Stress Relief ~ And a Recipe for Homemade Smoothie Mix I have to share with you my new favorite supplement! Recently I started making a blend of adaptogenic herbs that we have been adding to our smoothies, drinks, and various breakfast foods — whenever we’re feeling the need for a little support. My journey into adaptogens began shortly before formulating this Uplifting Loose Leaf Herbal Tea as a way to cope with “the winter blues.” It’s been fun testing out and trying new ways to incorporate these nourishing plants into our diet! Note: Keep an eye out, I will be sharing our favorite recipe very soon…

Guy Creates Trees That Grow 40 Different Fruits Sam Van Aken, an artist and professor at Syracuse University, uses “chip grafting” to create trees that each bear 40 different varieties of stone fruits or fruits with pits. The grafting process involves slicing a bit of a branch with a bud from a tree of one of the varieties and inserting it into a slit in a branch on the “working tree,” then wrapping the wound with tape until it heals and the bud starts to grow into a new branch. Over several years he adds slices of branches from other varieties to the working tree. In the spring the “Tree of 40 Fruit” has blossoms in many hues of pink and purple, and in the summer it begins to bear the fruits in sequence—Van Aken says it’s both a work of art and a time line of the varieties’ blossoming and fruiting. He’s created more than a dozen of the trees that have been planted at sites such as museums around the U.S., which he sees as a way to spread diversity on a small scale.

10 Reasons to Drink Lemon Water Every Morning Written By Michelle Toole I start out each day with a large glass of room temperature lemon water. Lemons are rich in vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamin C, an antioxidant that boosts the immune system, protects against cardiovascular disease and even has cancer-fighting properties. Incorporating warm water with lemon juice into your diet is an easy way to meet the daily recommended allowance for vitamin C and keep your body functioning smoothly. According to Ayurvedic philosophy, choices that you make regarding your daily routine either build up resistance to disease or tear it down

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